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Shane Curcuru
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Explaining Open Source Trademarks and Community: http://punderthings.com/ and http://chooseafoundation.com/
Explaining Open Source Trademarks and Community: http://punderthings.com/ and http://chooseafoundation.com/

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“Germany's Federal Court of Justice (BGH) in Karlsruhe made a landmark ruling on Thursday to allow relatives of people who have died access to the deceased's digital data.

The court ruled that the contract with Facebook was part of the parents' inheritance, and they should therefore be given complete access to their daughter's account.

Just as books and letters are passed to the heirs, so should the data, presiding Judge Ulrich Herrmann ruled, saying there was no reason to treat digital content differently.”
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Spiders fly with electric balloon butts. No, really. #Science

“When one thinks of airborne organisms, spiders do not usually come to mind. However, these wingless arthropods have been found 4 km up in the sky [1], dispersing hundreds of kilometers [2]. To disperse, spiders “balloon,” whereby they climb to the top of a prominence, let out silk, and float away. The prevailing view is that drag forces from light wind allow spiders to become airborne [3], yet ballooning mechanisms are not fully explained by current aerodynamic models [4, 5]. The global atmospheric electric circuit and the resulting atmospheric potential gradient (APG) [6] provide an additional force that has been proposed to explain ballooning [7]. Here, we test the hypothesis that electric fields (e-fields) commensurate with the APG can be detected by spiders and are sufficient to stimulate ballooning. We find that the presence of a vertical e-field elicits ballooning behavior and takeoff in spiders. We also investigate the mechanical response of putative sensory receivers in response to both e-field and air-flow stimuli, showing that spider mechanosensory hairs are mechanically activated by weak e-fields. Altogether, the evidence gathered reveals an electric driving force that is sufficient for ballooning. These results also suggest that the APG, as additional meteorological information, can reveal the auspicious time to engage in ballooning. We propose that atmospheric electricity adds key information to our understanding and predictive capability of the ecologically important mass migration patterns of arthropod fauna [8].” https://buff.ly/2znHwoc

How long until someone builds storage drives from spiders (highly sensitive to electric fields...)
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EU taking a lead on #daylightsavings?

“Following a number of requests from citizens, from the European Parliament, and from certain EU Member States, the Commission has decided to investigate the functioning of the current EU summertime arrangements and to assess whether or not they should be changed.

In this context, the Commission is interested in gathering the views of European citizens, stakeholders and Member States on the current EU summertime arrangements and on any potential change to those arrangements.”
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“An unknown entity gained control of an admin account for the Gentoo GitHub Organization and removed all access to the organization (and its repositories) from Gentoo developers. They then proceeded to make various changes to content....

* Root cause
The attacker gained access to a password of an organization administrator. Evidence collected suggests a password scheme where disclosure on one site made it easy to guess passwords for unrelated webpages.” https://buff.ly/2lXyzbB

Strong #passwords are always important.
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#BigData processing can unlock hidden data from our past.
“Analysing nearly four decades of archive footage from the Tour of Flanders, researchers from Ghent University have been able to detect climate change impacts on trees. Their findings were published today in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution.

Focusing on trees and shrubs growing around recognisable climbs and other 'landmarks' along the route of this major annual road cycling race in Belgium, the team looked at video footage from 1981 to 2016 obtained by Flemish broadcaster VRT. They visually estimated how many leaves and flowers were present on the day of the course (usually in early April) and linked their scores to climate data.

The ecologists found that the trees had advanced the timing of leafing and flowering in response to recent temperature changes. Before 1990, almost no trees had grown leaves at the time of the spring race. After that year, more and more trees visible in the television footage—in particular magnolia, hawthorn, hornbeam and birch trees—were already in full leaf.

These shifts were most strongly related to warmer average temperatures in the area, which have increased by 1.5°C since 1980.”
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Open the pod bay doors, HAL, indeed.

“A smart flying sphere
CIMON was developed by the European aerospace company Airbus on behalf of the German space agency, which is known by its German acronym, DLR. The robot's AI is IBM's famous Watson system.

CIMON is roughly spherical and weighs 11 lbs. (5 kilograms). The robot can converse with people, and it knows whom it's talking to thanks to facial-recognition software. (CIMON has a face of its own — a simple cartoon one.) The astronaut assistant is also mobile; once aboard the ISS, CIMON will be able to fly around, by sucking air in and expelling it through special tubes.

Though CIMON is flexible enough to interact with anyone, it's "tailored to" European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, who arrived at the ISS aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft earlier this month. CIMON's mission calls for the robot to work with Gerst on three separate investigations. ”
Space.com
Space.com
space.com
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“Computer scientists at Stanford University and Google have created technology that can track time down to 100 billionths of a second. It could be just what Wall Street is looking for.

System engineers at Nasdaq, the New York-based stock exchange, recently began testing an algorithm and software that they hope can synchronize a giant network of computers with that nanosecond precision. They say they have built a prototype, and are in the process of deploying a bigger version.

For an exchange like Nasdaq, such refinement is essential to accurately order the millions of stock trades that are placed on their computer systems every second.

Ultimately, this is about money. With stock trading now dominated by computers that make buying and selling decisions and execute them with blazing speed, keeping that order also means protecting profits. So-called high frequency trading firms place trades in a fraction of a second, sometimes in a bet that they can move faster than bigger competitors.” https://buff.ly/2tPtwO4

Isn't this a little ridiculous, in one way? It's merely a lot of engineering work to enable a very very very small number of humans to make bets literally faster than the human brain can think.
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All the cool kids have #Opensource Program Offices! Need independent help understanding #FOSS? Just ask... https://buff.ly/2KyzahI

@thenewstack: We're partnering with the @linuxfoundation to investigate how many organizations either have a formal #opensource management program or are planning to create one. Help out by taking our 8-min survey! #oss https://buff.ly/2MA9T42
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“California lawmakers passed one of the toughest data privacy laws like #GDPR in the United States today, as they faced pressure from an even stronger ballot measure in the state.

The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 is set to dramatically change how businesses handle data in the most populous state. Companies that store personal information — from major players like Google and Facebook, down to small businesses — will be required to disclose the types of data they collect, as well as allow consumers to opt out of having their data sold. The bill, which passed both chambers unanimously, was signed later in the day by Gov. Jerry Brown.”
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The government does something right: #18F's guide to README.md

“We find it helpful to think of the README as a guide to your code or project. It’s often helpful to create sections in the README for users to learn about the project. We recommend the following sections.

- What is this repo or project? (You can reuse the repo description you used earlier because this section doesn’t have to be long.)
- How does it work?
- Who will use this repo or project?
- What is the goal of this project?

You likely have the answer to many of these questions in your head and have discussed them with your team. It's helpful to write them down for people who find your repository. Not only will it be easier for developers to know how to fork the project or become involved with the project, but it will be easy for non-coders to understand what the code is designed to do, and how they, too, can become involved.”
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