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Watch STC Artistic Director Michael Kahn talk about the many things he considers and expects when assembling a season like our new 2015-2016 Season: https://youtu.be/3xnot2Prm7o

SAVE up to 30% off with Season Tickets! Learn more about the season and subscribe today: http://goo.gl/MBWlxA
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The view from the stage at last night's first Free For All performance of A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM!

Starting at 5:30 p.m. today we'll release another allotment of tickets to people waiting in line for tonight's 7:30 p.m. performance. Arrive early and get in line!

The lottery for tomorrow, Thursday, 9/3, 8 p.m. performance is now open: www.ShakespeareTheatre.org/FFA
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Turning sets into selfies...

Elaine Sabal, Prop Shop Director, unveils our new digital Photo Booth!

Made out of materials from AS YOU LIKE IT's set, the photo booth will be in the lobby for all of our productions this season. Stop by and snap a few shots!
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A special edition of the Prosecast podcast has arrived!

Go behind the scenes a little more than usual with a phone call between Drew Lichtenberg, Literary Associate, and Ethan McSweeny, Director of A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, this season’s Free for All production.

Drew and Ethan talk about the unique opportunities that come with remounting a past production, they revisit some of the stage magic in Ethan’s 2012 Midsummer, and Ethan reluctantly admits he was here when it all started.

Subscribe to the Prosecast on iTunes: https://goo.gl/ctYe38

Or stream/download here: http://goo.gl/FWgWjw
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"The nameless daughter of Herod II and Herodias in the New Testament is synonymous with seduction and vengeance: She danced before the king, requested the decollation of St. John the Baptist, and proudly displayed the head of the man who reproved her mother’s marriage on a platter. The world has given this biblical character a narrative and a name, linking her to a historical figure mentioned by Josephus, and her legend has spanned paintings, films, dramas, and opera through the ages."

American Theatre Magazine writes about two productions, including our own, attempting to free SALOMÉ: http://goo.gl/Cifksc

SALOMÉ is currently only available as part of Season Tickets. Learn more and buy your Season Tickets today: http://goo.gl/LWxKUS
Two wildly different new versions unveil the woman behind the myth.
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Have them in circles
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Kat Stroot's profile photo
Shakespeare's Monologues's profile photo
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Sherry Merrill's profile photo
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ALLS WELL THAT ENDS WELL - William Shakespeare - medias agents and producers's profile photo
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The cast and artists of SALOMÉ arrived yesterday to begin rehearsal!

They're ALREADY hard at work building this new production from the ground up. 

Learn more about SALOMÉ and buy your tickets today! --> http://goo.gl/Xa10O6
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Tickets to our 2015-2016 Season are now on sale!

Save up to 30% off with Season Tickets or explore other buying options:  http://wfly.co/Bz06A 

Call our Box Office Staff at 202.547.1122 if you have any questions or need help with your purchase.
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You should do ALL the things in this list but especially #10: http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/free-things-washington-dc
With an entire collection of free museums, Washington, D.C., might be the best city to visit if you’re looking to stick to a budget. Here's our list of the best free things to do there.
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Happy 143rd Birthday, Aubrey Beardsley!

His sensual and disturbing illustrations fantastically complement Oscar Wilde's publication of SALOMÉ. 

While our production of SALOMÉ is not Oscar Wilde's play, we've done a lot of dramaturgical research to understand how the woman, Salomé, has been represented over centuries. Reading Wilde's play with Beardsley's illustrations has been a highlight of the job!

"The Toilet of Salomé" at The British Museum: http://goo.gl/eLA2W5 "The Peacock Skirt" at the V&A: http://goo.gl/jIK1GI "The Dancer's Reward" at the V&A: http://goo.gl/Cb0jix

Learn more about our production of SALOMÉ: http://goo.gl/38QItp
This is a design for an illustration to the English edition of Oscar Wilde's notorious play Salome which was written in French and then translated into English by his friend Lord Alfred Douglas ('Bosie'). It caused a scandal. In 1895, Oscar Wilde was convicted of ‘gross indecency' after a famous court battle with Douglas' father, the Marquess of Queensberry. Beardsley, associated with Wilde because of these illustrations, was sacked as Art Editor...
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TAMING OF THE SHREW: Is love a thing that can be bought, packaged, and sold?
By Drew Lichtenberg, Literary Manager

[This is the final of Drew's introductions to our 2015-2016 Season in our Guide to the Season's Plays, now available.]

"Contra Shaw (an infamous bard-hater), TAMING OF THE SHREW has remained provocatively contemporary in its own right. In place of the repertories that have dominated the stage for six months in each of our past three seasons, this upcoming season features two productions inspired by SHREW, placed almost six months apart, that refract this most controversial of Shakespeare’s plays into two wildly different visions. Shakespeare, who sets his play in the mercantile fantasia of Italy, far from the hardscrabble realism of his own (and Christopher Fry’s) Warwickshire, depicts marriage purely as a transaction of property, an entirely separate realm from that of the church. As Gary Taylor—one of our most provocative thinkers on the modern meanings of Shakespeare—writes in this issue, Shakespeare was at least four centuries ahead of his time on the significance of marriage as a civil right:

That is, after all, why gay marriage has been debated in the courts. People can have sex without economic consequences, but legal matrimony affects property rights, inheritance, and tax deductions.

Shakespeare’s later, 'high' comedies are devoted almost entirely to the pleasures found in the courtship leading up to marriage. After SHREW, he only rarely attempted comedies in which the marriage happens halfway through the action. The reason perhaps is simple. He had already investigated marriage and all its discontents. His work still has much to teach us about modern marriage, if we’re willing to look it directly in the eye."

Skip ahead of social media and get the Guide to the Season's Plays --> http://goo.gl/fG5X4r

Buy Season Tickets and follow along all year long --> http://goo.gl/Ew7DHr
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People
Have them in circles
55 people
Kat Stroot's profile photo
Shakespeare's Monologues's profile photo
Brian Graham's profile photo
Sherry Merrill's profile photo
JR Russ's profile photo
Dara Gold's profile photo
ALLS WELL THAT ENDS WELL - William Shakespeare - medias agents and producers's profile photo
Colleen O'Brien's profile photo
Marvin Rue's profile photo
Contact Information
Contact info
Phone
202-547-1122
Address
450 7th Street NW, Washington, DC, 20004
610 F Street NW, Washington, DC, 20004
Story
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Groundbreaking, thought-provoking and eminently accessible classic theatre in a uniquely American style.
Introduction
The mission of the Shakespeare Theatre Company is to present classic theatre of scope and size in an imaginative, skillful and accessible American style that honors the playwrights’ language and intentions while viewing their work through a 21st-century lens.

The Shakespeare Theatre Company produces and presents award-winning plays in its two venues in downtown Washington D.C., attracting many theatre-goers from D.C., Maryland, Virginia and from around the world. As a non-profit arts organization our education programs bring classical theatre experiences, critical discussions and vital academic resources into area schools and communities. 

We also host a number of other arts organizations who perform world class dance, music, and much more. 

Explore the world of STC and purchase tickets at www.ShakespeareTheatre.org.