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Seval Gunes
Worked at Tobacco Farm, Germany
Lives in Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex
421 followers|205,661 views
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Seval Gunes

Sci-Fi/Fantasy  - 
 
Just watched "Automata" by Gabe Ibáñez with Antonio Banderas in the lead. Excellent dystopian Sci-Fi thriller that reminded me a little of Ex Machina. 
Highly recommended. I give it a 8/10. 
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1971325/?ref_=nv_sr_1
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Seval Gunes

Action/Thrillers  - 
 
In preparation for the new Terminator Genisys: 
The Terminator Saga in 5 minutes.
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Seval Gunes

Trailers  - 
 
All trailers are the same!
Excellent compilation and analysis of blockbuster movie trailers. 
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Seval Gunes

Sci-Fi/Fantasy  - 
May the fourth -- "Star Wars" Day -- has arrived. With that in mind, we thought it was an ideal date to continue our look back at the Los Angeles Times' original reviews of the first "Star Wars" trilogy.
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Seval Gunes

Shared publicly  - 
 
NBC found 10 more embellishments by him. 
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Seval Gunes

Comedies  - 
 
Some more inside information about Airplane! with the 35th Anniversary coming up. 
Imitation is considered the sincerest form of flattery, but when it comes to parody, that’s a bit more hit-or-miss. This is particularly evident within the parody-film genre, which has been watered down by movie studios looking for ways to cash in on the latest pop culture phenomenon without having
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+therollingbeatles123 And, don't call me Shirley.
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Seval Gunes

Indies/guilty pleasures  - 
 
Most dangerous movie ever made.
Didn't know about it at all. What were they thinking?
Watch an exclusive clip of Melanie Griffith’s very real lion attack from the film ‘Roar,’ the most dangerous movie ever made. It will be re-released in theaters this week.
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+Seval Gunes thats the problem they weren't thinking at all
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Seval Gunes

Sci-Fi/Fantasy  - 
 
Review of Interstellar by an astronaut. From Quora.
What do the astronauts think about the movie Interstellar?
Garrett Reisman, Former NASA Astronaut
8.7k upvotes 
A few days ago, a group of us from SpaceX took the afternoon off to watch Christopher Nolan’s ‘Interstellar’. We loved it. Then again, we don’t get out very often. We probably could have sat through ‘Gigli’ and loved it.

As for myself, I thoroughly enjoyed the movie, but there were a few things that struck me as inaccurate. First and foremost – the casting.  I mean, is it really necessary to fill every astronaut movie with actors like Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, George Clooney, Sandra Bullock, Tom Hanks, and Kevin Bacon? How am I supposed to live up to that? I’m only 5 foot 5 inches tall, for crying out loud! Once, just once, can’t someone make a blockbuster space action-adventure movie starring Paul Giamatti or Wallace Shawn? Please?

There were lesser flaws worth noting. (Spoilers follow!) For example, there is no way a big government bureaucracy like NASA has a meeting with less than a dozen participants. Secondly, as with many movies that depict artificial gravity achieved through a rotating spacecraft structure, the Endurance’s diameter was much too small to create a non-nauseating equivalent of Earth’s gravity. Finally, if an advanced civilization can create a time-space bookshelf tesseract, why can’t they equip it with a whiteboard? I know that using flying books, misbehaving watches, and binary dust patterns are much more dramatic means of communication, but explaining a completely new unified theory of gravitational force would be much easier with equations and diagrams than with a seemingly random set of binary data.

But there were a lot of things that ‘Interstellar’ gets right. Many of the relativistic effects were spot on. (Or at least so I am told by some of my old Caltech buddies.) It was interesting to see many examples of space hardware that were familiar. The deep freezer that holds the frozen embryos of our progeny looks just like the one we have on the International Space Station. (Although we don’t have genetic material to populate a planet in there, yet perhaps that would be a good idea…) The hemispherical windows on Endurance look just like the Cupola on the International Space Station and many of the switch panels would have seemed at home on Endeavour. And as we all know, Love truly transcends time and space.

It was particularly interesting for me to note how often Cooper takes manual control of his spacecraft. Bucking the real-world trend toward ever-increasing automation, it seemed like every 5 minutes he was grabbing the stick and taking manual control. As metaphor, clearly this represents the characters’ desperate attempts to control their own destiny, and the destiny of their species. ‘Interstellar’ is an expression of our very strong American notion of free will – that we are all free agents able to make choices that shape our destiny. With this free agency comes a heavy burden of responsibility; witness the crushing defeat in Professor Brand’s vain struggle to enact the destiny he so desires for the human race. But free will is an essential ingredient of the quintessential American hero archetype – the explorer, the pioneer – the lone individual who rises to the challenge and saves the day through skill, grit, and initiative - Cooper. While other cultures place value in collective group effort or trust in fate rather than cherish individual achievement, we do not. We accept the burden of our choices as well as their rewards. This archetype is part and parcel of our national character and it is important to hold fast to this mythology to inspire our next generation of Coopers as we confront the new frontier of space. 

Of course, the other main theme of ‘Interstellar’ is the relationship between fathers and their children. This aspect of the movie definitely rang true to me too.

A short while ago, I returned from a speaking engagement wearing my blue NASA astronaut flight jacket. When I arrived at home to tuck my 4-year old son into bed for the night, he looked up at me and asked if I had just been to space again. When I told him no, he asked, “Well, are you going to space again soon?”

“Not without you,” I replied sincerely.

At first a look of reassured contentment came over his face only to be followed by the furrowed brow of concern and worry.

“But I don’t have a flight jacket,” he said.

I love that kid. I’d definitely fly into a black hole in order to save him.
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Seval Gunes

Sci-Fi/Fantasy  - 
 
The Onion reviews the new Avengers movie. 
I didn't watch it as I am afraid of spoilers. I guess folks who have already seen it can watch it now.
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It showed some fighting scenes but no real spoilers.
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Seval Gunes

Discussion  - 
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Seval Gunes's profile photoJohn Shim's profile photo
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Personally,  I do think Type I modic changes have some correlation to discogenic back pain.   But you are right.  There is never 100% sensitivity or specificity.    There continues to be plenty of research on so called biomarkers of pain.  It would be great if someday we will confidently have an assay that will determine the significance of the presence of the so called biomarker.  At the same time,  you and I both know that Pain has more than just physical origins.  
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Seval Gunes

Sci-Fi/Fantasy  - 
 
Great video to watch in preparation to Avengers: Age of Ultron.
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Thanks for the back story, was helpful! Although a bit late as my daughter suggested we go last night. Saw it in 3D too! Despite knowing zilch I thought it was great, good script too, audience laughed at the in-jokes.
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Seval Gunes

Sci-Fi/Fantasy  - 
 
From Quora: 

Q: Scientifically most inaccurate movie?

Edward Davies, Question, Hypothesis, Theory, Fact. 333 upvotes 
As the questioner states: The Core (2003). Nothing really touches this.

Scientific problems:
Core of the Planet stops rotating: This happens because humans send a pulse deep into the earth as a potential weapon. This is like trying to stop spinning turbine with tissue paper.
Magnetic Field breaks down: If the the core did stop spinning, wouldn't the magnetic field pretty much just end? There shouldn't be any months long decay of the field.
An amethyst geode in the mantle: The pressure and heat would never, ever, ever have enabled this to happen. If it somehow did, punching through the wall would have resulted in the virtually immediate collapse of the geode.
Lava or magma: Okay this is a nit-picky one, but these are scientist with vast knowledge of geology. One refers to underground molten rock as lava instead of correctly as magma.
Misplacement of tectonic plates: When did Hawaii get an edge of the tectonic plates?
Communication by radio at the Earth's core: Really? I can't get radio service in a tunnel let alone through miles of earth, mantle and core. I don't care how powerful the signal, this is absolute bull. Maybe they dragged a long cable behind them through 10,000F magma...
Modern pacemakers affected by solar microwave radiation: No.
9,000F survival: A tunnel walk in a suit that can withstand 4,500F means that the walker experienced 4,500F temperatures.  This means death in an instant.
Microwave radiation destroys the Golden Gate Bridge: Earth's atmosphere actually disperses much of the microwave radiation from the sun. Only the absence of that atmosphere would allow for full force of the microwave radiation and even then the amount would not be able to melt the steel on the bridge. Never mind the fact that the lack of atmosphere would be a far more pressing matter for most of us...

I'm sure there are plenty of other scientific faults in the movie but this is a start and though others have listed movies with many faults the sheer variety and magnitude of the ones in "The Core" really stand out to me.

http://geolor.com/The_Core_Movie...
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One of my all-time favourites, largely because the science is so bad that I laugh a lot.  Good comedy.
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Work
Occupation
Working in a sweat shop until I can win the Jackpot.
Skills
Can smell bullshit from a mile away.
Employment
  • Tobacco Farm, Germany
    Picking tobacco leaves, 1984
  • Mercedes-Benz Sindelfingen, Germany
    Worked in manufacturing W201 series, 1985
  • NSW Railroads, Sydney, Australia
    Inventory Clerk, 1988
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Introduction
Already using Google search, Gmail, Google Docs (now Drive), I may as well try G+.
Bragging rights
Still alive. >500k points in Donkey Kong in 1983.
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex
Previously
Ankara, Turkey - London - Sydney, NSW - Austria - Baltimore, MD - Buffalo, NY - Houston, TX - Heidelberg, Germany - Munich, Germany - Rochester, MN
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