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Seb Paquet
Worked at Sceneverse, Inc.
Attended Université de Montréal
Lives in Montreal
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Seb Paquet

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Wayne Radinsky originally shared to Solid State Life:
 
McDonald's plans to open a restaurant run entirely by robots. "The restaurant will still employ a small team to insure all of the robots are working correctly, the food and cleaning supplies remain stocked along with removing the money collected by the robots. Visitors to the restaurant will see these new robots working in harmony at a speed of 50 times faster than the average human employee, with no chance of error. If the test launch for the store is a success, people can expect to see robots located in every store all over the country and at restaurants around the world."

Looks like this could be satire.
"With the high demand for a minimum wage of $15/hr and the protests getting worse, this is something we had to implement. Plus with the high margin of human error, poor hygiene, lack of education, laziness, as well as the recent advancements in artificial intelligence it just makes sense to automate our restaurants."
Phoenix, AZ — After seeing a decline in earnings for the first time in nine years, McDonald's plans to do something no other store of its kind has ever done before; open a store run entirely by robots.
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After novelty wears off, people may ask, why eat in a factory? And who gives a smile?
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Algorithms that enable robots to learn motor tasks through trial and error using a process that more closely approximates the way humans learn have been developed.

"They demonstrated their technique, a type of reinforcement learning, by having a robot complete various tasks -- putting a clothes hanger on a rack, assembling a toy plane, screwing a cap on a water bottle, and more -- without pre-programmed details about its surroundings."

"The key is that when a robot is faced with something new, we won't have to reprogram it. The exact same software, which encodes how the robot can learn, was used to allow the robot to learn all the different tasks we gave it."
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Imagine being able to see three times better than 20/20 vision without wearing glasses or contacts — even at age 100 or more — with the help of bionic lenses implanted in your eyes.
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I want them!
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now this sounds like a futuristic headline
 
The world's first 3D-printed wearable containing living bacteria, designed to support the human wearer as a type of "living spacesuit" on trips to outer space, has been displayed at TED 2015.
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Seb Paquet

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Tyger AC originally shared to NextFuture NextHumans:
 
The objective of OcumeticsTM Technology Corporation is to offer better than 20/20 vision for a lifetime. Employing state-of-the art materials and production techniques, OcumeticsTM Technology Corporation is pleased to announc...
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+Omar Bickell Right. We know it is extremely difficult to predict the future of technology... it can surprise us in both positive and negative manners.
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How to instantly turn strangers into sleepover buddies
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Corina Marinescu originally shared to MEDICINE:
 
Cytotoxic T cells
A cytotoxic T cell  is a T lymphocyte (a type of white blood cell) that kills cancer cells, cells that are infected (particularly with viruses), or cells that are damaged in other ways.

There are billions of T cells within our blood – one teaspoon full of blood alone is believed to have around 5 million T cells, each measuring around 10 micrometres in length, about a tenth the width of a human hair. Each cell is engaged in the ferocious and unrelenting battle to keep us healthy.

The cells, seen in the animation as orange or green amorphous ‘blobs’ move around rapidly, investigating their environment as they travel. When a cytotoxic T cell finds an infected cell or, in the case of the animation, a cancer cell (blue), membrane protrusions rapidly explore the surface of the cell, checking for tell-tale signs that this is an uninvited guest.

The T cell binds to the cancer cell and injects poisonous proteins known as cytotoxins (red) down special pathways called microtubules to the interface between the T cell and the cancer cell, before puncturing the surface of the cancer cell and delivering its deadly cargo.

Source:
http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/bodys-serial-killers-captured-on-film-destroying-cancer-cells#sthash.6UhIhxZr.dpuf

Animation:
The time-lapse footage was created by stitching together microscopic slices of the killer cells and their quarry, according to a written statement released by the University of Cambridge. It shows T cells (orange or green blobs) encountering cancer cells (blue blobs) and injecting them with lethal proteins known as cytotoxins (red).

Paper:
http://www.cell.com/immunity/abstract/S1074-7613%2815%2900173-9

Article:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/19/t-cell-video-killers-video_n_7298828.html?ncid=edlinkushpmg00000030

#cancer   #medicine   #Tcells  
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Apparently this is a real product. 
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The link below is to a paper put out by the IMF that attempts to estimate the amount by which fossil fuels are subsidized. The answers are staggeringly large. The good news is that although quite a large fraction of the subsidy is as a result of not making them pay for the adverse effects of climate change, this is outweighed by the subsidy as a result of not making them pay for local damage, such as the costs associated with the effect of pollution on people's health.

This is in principle very good news indeed, because it means that it is in the interests of countries like China to cut down on fossil fuel subsidy even if they act unilaterally. So the seemingly intractable prisoner's-dilemma aspect of the problem may not be so bad after all. In the words of the report itself:


Most energy subsidies arise from the failure to adequately charge for the cost of domestic environmental damage—only about one-quarter of the total is from climate change—so unilateral reform of energy subsidies is mostly in countries’ own interests, although global coordination could strengthen such efforts.

The fiscal, environmental, and welfare impacts of energy subsidy reform are potentially enormous. Eliminating post-tax subsidies in 2015 could raise government revenue by $2.9 trillion (3.6 percent of global GDP), cut global CO2 emissions by more than 20 percent, and cut premature air pollution deaths by more than half. After allowing for the higher energy costs faced by consumers, this action would raise global economic welfare by $1.8 trillion (2.2 percent of global GDP).

It is sometimes said that to persuade climate-change deniers of the need to cut down on fossil fuels, one needs to present them with a positive vision of what the future would be like if we did so, rather than an avoiding-doom picture. Now, amazingly, it looks as though we have the means to do that. Maybe you don't believe in AGW, or believe that money spent combating it would be better spent directly combating poverty. But if the IMF is correct, then ending subsidies on fossil fuels will make us better off, so it will help us to alleviate poverty, whether or not you believe in the other benefits of reducing emissions.
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Education
  • Université de Montréal
    Ph.D. Computer Science, 2003
  • Université de Montréal
    B.Sc. Physics, 1997
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
October 1
Story
Bragging rights
I coined the phrase "Ridiculously Easy Group-Forming".
Work
Occupation
Culture Hacker
Employment
  • Sceneverse, Inc.
    VP & Social Alchemist
  • National Research Council of Canada
    Research Officer
  • Socialtext, Inc.
  • Téluq-UQAM
    Professor
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Montreal
Previously
moncton - hull, qc - vancouver, bc