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Scott Toste
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Animation of Venus, now returning, east before dawn.
http://bit.ly/1Lv1rxF

Venus from Aug 2015 through March 2016
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You're not just a product of your genetic code. You are also a product of your epigenetics which is influenced by your behavior and that of your ancestors.

You've probably learned that the "code of life" is DNA. It's a very, very long molecule made of four repeating nucleic acid bases. These four bases pair up with each other (adenine with thymine, and cytosine with guanine), and then link with other base pairs to form a long chain that's shaped like a twisted ladder known as the double helix. The specific sequence of base pairs along this chain is our genetic code. Enzymes called ribosomes "read" the code (after it's been translated into RNA) and use this information to create proteins. Proteins are the machinery of life that conduct metabolic activity and give organisms structure. This is all very cool stuff (to me), but you may think it is kind of boring. Take a look at this well made, very cool video and you might change your mind. It's about epigenetics which is the process by which external or environmental factors switch genes on and off and affect how cells read genes. Still sounds boring? Well watch the video and you'll learn why women are stripey and calico cats are only female. The animation is cool, too.

#genetics   #epigenetics   #DNA  
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Odd, but interesting exploration of the nature of reality. Robert Kuhn, the PBS Closer To Truth, creator discusses with philosophers and theoreticians what simulated worlds would be like. I don't think we live in a simulation. But simulations can be handy tools for modeling this processes in nature which could make it easier to understand how things work.
Could we actually be living in the Matrix? You might be surprised.
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The FDA has given approval to a drug that is produced on a 3-D printer. It is designed to rapidly dissolve with a sip of water.
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Here's a great interview series from "Closer To Truth."

"Everything we know, think and feel—everything!—comes from our brains. But consciousness, our private sense of inner awareness, remains a mystery. Brain activities—spiking of neuronal impulses, sloshing of neurochemicals—are not at all the same thing as sights, sounds, smells, emotions. How on earth can our inner experiences be explained in physical terms?"
Everything we know, think and feel—everything!—comes from our brains. But consciousness, our private sense of inner awareness, remains a mystery. Brain activities—spiking of neuronal impulses, sloshing of neurochemicals—are not at all the same thing as sights, sounds, smells, emotions. How on earth can our inner experiences be explained in physical terms?
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Here's a great NASA video detailing the New Horizons mission.
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Lagrange Points: Parking Places in Space ... Elizabeth Howell -- "Lagrange point is a location in space where the combined gravitational forces of two large bodies, such as Earth and the sun or Earth and the moon, equal the centrifugal force felt by a much smaller third body. The interaction of the forces creates a point of equilibrium where a spacecraft may be "parked" to make observations.

These points are named after Joseph-Louis Lagrange, an 18th-century mathematician who wrote about them in a 1772 paper concerning what he called the "three-body problem." They are also called Lagrangian points and libration points. 

There are five Lagrange points around major bodies such as a planet or a star. Three of them lie along the line connecting the two large bodies. In the Earth-sun system, for example, the first point, L1, lies between Earth and the sun at about 1 million miles from Earth. L1 gets an uninterrupted view of the sun, and is currently occupied by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Deep Space Climate Observatory.

L2 also lies a million miles from Earth, but in the opposite direction of the sun. At this point, with the Earth, moon and sun behind it, a spacecraft can get a clear view of deep space. NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) is currently at this spot measuring the cosmic background radiation left over from the Big Bang. The James Webb Space Telescope will move into this region in 2018.

The third Lagrange point, L3, lies behind the sun, opposite Earth's orbit. For now, science has not found a use for this spot, although science fiction has.

“NASA is unlikely to find any use for the L3 point since it remains hidden behind the sun at all times,” NASA wrote on a web page about Lagrange points. “The idea of a hidden 'Planet-X' at the L3 point has been a popular topic in science fiction writing. The instability of Planet X's orbit (on a time scale of 150 years) didn't stop Hollywood from turning out classics like 'The Man from Planet X.'”

L1, L2 and L3 are all unstable points with precarious equilibrium. If a spacecraft at L3 drifted toward or away from Earth, it would fall irreversibly toward the sun or Earth, "like a barely balanced cart atop a steep hill," according to astronomer Neil DeGrasse Tyson. Spacecraft must make slight adjustments to maintain their orbits.
Points L4 and L5, however, are stable, "like a ball in a large bowl," according to the European Space Agency. These points lie along Earth's orbit at 60 degrees ahead of and behind Earth, forming the apex of two equilateral triangles that have the large masses (Earth and the sun, for example) as their vertices.

Because of the stability of these points, dust and asteroids tend to accumulate in these regions. Asteroids that surround the L4 and L5 points are called Trojans in honor of the asteroids Agamemnon, Achilles and Hector (all characters in the story of the siege of Troy) that are between Jupiter and the Sun. NASA states that there have been thousands of these types of asteroids found in our solar system, including Earth’s only known Trojan asteroid, 2010 TK7.

L4 and L5 are also possible points for a space colony due to their relative proximity to Earth, at least according to the writings of Gerard O'Neill and related thinkers. In the 1970s and 1980s, a group called the L5 Society promoted this idea among its members. In the late 1980s, it merged into a group that is now known as the National Space Society, an advocacy organization that promotes the idea of forming civilizations beyond Earth. ..."

MORE: http://www.space.com/30302-lagrange-points.html
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This short video shows how removing non-native trout from selected high-mountain lakes at Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks gives native frogs a chance to survive.
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As 2020 draws closer, plans for humanity's sixth Martian rover are coming together
The second in a series of meetings to select the landing site for the Mars 2020 rover is in progress. Van Kane gives us an update.
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When I was a kid I used to dream about flying in the sky like Superman or Rocketman. In the 1960's jetpacks were built that used hydrogen peroxide powered engines. They were innately unstable and only had 30 seconds of (potential) flight. I occasionally see one of these devices still being used today, but only as a publicity stunt (last one I saw was at a Star Wars Convention). Cool, but not practical. A Swiss pilot named Yves Rossy built a jet powered wing and in 2004 strapped it to his back. Guess what? It worked. Check out the video to see some spectacular demonstrations of this incredible flying device. In 2008, he successfully flew across the English Channel in 9 minutes, 7 seconds. His speed reached 186 mph during the crossing. Since then he has—in several flights—managed to fly in a formation with three military jets and cross the Grand Canyon.

Excerpts from www.jetman.com:
"A professional pilot, Yves Rossy sought to move out of the cockpit in the continuous pursuit of flight through innovation and ingenuity to achieve mankind’s dream of engine-powered flight for humans. Drawn initially to the world of free fall, he experimented with ways to increase his flight time and enhance his ability to select his trajectory, which introduced him to sky surfing and wingsuiting."

"Still not satisfied, he developed his first real wing comprising a rigid harness integrated into inflatable wing panels that he strapped to his back. The next step was towards maintaining and gaining altitude by improving efficiency with a rigid wing and adding propulsion."

"Yves chose to go with model jet turbines, at first two of them, allowing him to maintain level flight in 2004, and then four engines in 2006. Till now, Yves Rossy has conducted winged flights over the Swiss Alps, the English Channel, the Grand Canyon and other iconic locations."

From Wikipedia:
Swiss ex-military and commercial pilot Yves Rossy developed and built a winged pack with rigid aeroplane-type carbon-fiber wings spanning about 2.4 m (8 ft) and four small kerosene-burning jet engines underneath; these engines are large versions of a type designed for model aeroplanes. He wears a heat-resistant suit similar to that of a firefighter or racing driver to protect him from the hot jet exhaust. Similarly, to further protect the wearer, the engines are modified with the addition of a carbon fibre heat shield extending the jet nozzle around the exhaust tail.

Rossy claims to be "the first person to gain altitude and maintain a stable horizontal flight thanks to aerodynamic carbon foldable wings", which are folded by hinges at their midpoint. After being lifted to altitude by a plane, he ignites the engines just before he exits the plane with the wings folded. The wings unfold while in free-fall, and he is then able to fly horizontally for several minutes, landing with the help of a parachute. He achieves true controlled flight using his body and a hand throttle to maneuver.

The system is said by Rossy to be highly responsive and reactive in flight, to the point where he needs to closely control his head, arm and leg movements in order not to enter an uncontrolled spin. The engines on the wing require precise common alignment during set-up, also in order to prevent instability. An electronic starter system ensures that all four engines ignite simultaneously. In the event of a spin, the wing unit can be detached from the pilot, and both pilot and wing unit descend to Earth on separated parachutes.
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Find the magnetic declination
at your location.
Click on the map to find the magnetic declination at your location
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Have him in circles
303 people
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Farmer & Pharmacist
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Explorer - Scientist - Scholar - Farmer - Family Man
Introduction
So what can I briefly say about myself? Nature fascinates me, and I am passionate about exploring it. I use the tools of science and technology to understand it, my senses to enjoy it, and photography to record it. Oh, and I love maps.

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Photography is my hobby and I'm an avid hiker and explorer. The Sierra Nevada Mountains of California and the Pacific Coast are my favorite places to visit. I have an incredible wife and two boys. My oldest son survived childhood cancer and has been cancer free since the end of 2008! I have a Doctorate in Pharmacy.
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