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Scott Toste
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Behind the headlines and news conferences announcing the discovery were decades of hard work, hundreds of scientists and more than a billion dollars in taxpayer funds.
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This is purely hitech space project but advantage and disadvantage does this portend to mankind.
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Einstein vs Vader
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"And what we’ve seen, for the first time, is not just one of the greatest predictions of Einstein’s General Relativity, although we did just verify that. And it isn’t just that we took our first step into the world of gravitational wave astronomy, although LIGO will doubtlessly start seeing more of these signals over the coming years; this is as exciting for astronomy as Galileo’s invention of the telescope, as we’re seeing the Universe in a new way for the first time. But the biggest news of all is that we’ve just detected two merging black holes for the first time, tested their physics, found a tremendous agreement with Einstein, and seen evidence that this happens over a billion light years away across the Universe."

More than 100 years after Einstein’s relativity came out, one of its last great predictions — the existence of gravitational radiation — has been directly experimentally confirmed! The LIGO collaboration has observed two ~30 solar mass black holes merging together, producing a slightly less massive final black hole as three sun’s worth of mass was converted into energy via Einstein’s E = mc^2. This type of event, although quite serendipitous for the LIGO collaboration, is expected to occur between 2 and 4 times per year within the range of what LIGO can reach. Additionally, other types of mergers should be within the reach of what LIGO can see. Not only have we seen our first gravitational wave event, but we’re poised to truly begin the era of gravitational wave astronomy, as a new type of telescope is finally capable of seeing what’s happening in our Universe. 
Nearly 100 years after they were predicted, gravitational waves have been directly observed for the first time. Welcome to the era of gravitational wave astronomy!
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"LIGO Detects Gravitational Waves from Merging Black Holes
Illustration Credit: LIGO, NSF, Aurore Simonnet (Sonoma State U.)"
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160211.html

"Gravitational radiation has been directly detected. The first-ever detection was made by both facilities of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in Washington and Louisiana simultaneously last September. After numerous consistency checks, the resulting 5-sigma discovery was published today. The measured gravitational waves match those expected from two large black holes merging after a death spiral in a distant galaxy, with the resulting new black hole momentarily vibrating in a rapid ringdown. A phenomenon predicted by Einstein, the historic discovery confirms a cornerstone of humanity's understanding of gravity and basic physics. It is also the most direct detection of black holes ever. The featured illustration depicts the two merging black holes with the signal strength of the two detectors over 0.3 seconds superimposed across the bottom. Expected future detections by Advanced LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors may not only confirm the spectacular nature of this measurement but hold tremendous promise of giving humanity a new way to see and explore our universe."
 
LIGO Detects Gravitational Waves from Merging Black Holes
Illustration Credit: LIGO, NSF, Aurore Simonnet (Sonoma State U.)
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160211.html

Gravitational radiation has been directly detected. The first-ever detection was made by both facilities of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in Washington and Louisiana simultaneously last September. After numerous consistency checks, the resulting 5-sigma discovery was published today. The measured gravitational waves match those expected from two large black holes merging after a death spiral in a distant galaxy, with the resulting new black hole momentarily vibrating in a rapid ringdown. A phenomenon predicted by Einstein, the historic discovery confirms a cornerstone of humanity's understanding of gravity and basic physics. It is also the most direct detection of black holes ever. The featured illustration depicts the two merging black holes with the signal strength of the two detectors over 0.3 seconds superimposed across the bottom. Expected future detections by Advanced LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors may not only confirm the spectacular nature of this measurement but hold tremendous promise of giving humanity a new way to see and explore our universe.
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Borrelia mayonii, a newly discovered bacterium, may also be a cause of Lyme Disease. The other more well known bacterium is Borrelia burgdorferi.
It's not the tick that causes Lyme disease, but the bacteria that live in its spit. Scientists at the Mayo Clinic have found a second bacterium capable of causing the disease in people.
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"In spite of being a scientist, I strongly believe an education that fails to place a heavy emphasis on the humanities is a missed opportunity. Without a base in humanities, both the students — and the democratic society these students must enter as informed citizens — are denied a full view of the heritage and critical habits of mind that make civilization worth the effort."

"There is, of course, another way to view the question of whether a liberal arts education has value. It can be seen as posing the question as to whether college should be seen as some kind of higher vocational training, instead: a place to go to for a specific certification for a specific job."

What do you think?
Old barriers between the humanities and technology are falling. Skills needed in jobs today require knowledge that crosses the road from technology to humanities and back, says professor Adam Frank.
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+Jerry Fahrni, I have a friend that went through the electrical engineering program many years ago and he felt the same as you. Coursework in any subject is always more palatable when you study it by choice rather than as a requirement. I guess each person's feelings about this depends on their objectives. If you want to get in and get done as quickly and efficiently as possible, then it becomes a distraction from your goal. I will always believe, however, that the more you know about the world, the better able you are to understand and deal with something new that comes along. Our kids will be working in a different world than ours that may require a greater breadth of skills and knowledge. On the other hand, I think you and I agree that some degree requirements get a bit silly when it comes to liberal studies stuff. 
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Still want more information about the LIGO gravitational wave discovery? Check me out on my local news!
Theoretical Astrophysicist: Gravitational wave detection is the discovery of the
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Use of a "starshade shape" to reduce the light coming from a star may allow us to observe exoplanets in the future.
 
"The light from Vega was reduced by more than a factor of one billion, and many new stars that had never been seen before were discovered just by performing this simple test. By blocking the starlight using this new concept — the starshade — we were able to view objects closer to the star than ever before. The next step? Get one into orbit and empower it to work with a Hubble-class (or greater!) optical space telescope. We’ll be able to see the light directly from dozens of rocky planets, for the first time, including their spectra as the planet rotates and revolves in its own orbit."

25 years ago, there were no planets known around Sun-like stars other than our own. Just 5 years ago, there were no rocky planets known around Sun-like stars other than our own. And today, we don’t have any direct images of those rocky worlds potentially suitable for life. But in just another ten to fifteen years, that might not be true anymore. By blocking out the light in front of a star, you can potentially see the light from the faint planet instead. While conventional coronagraphs might reduce the amount of light transmitted by a factor of one million, a hypergaussian surface at the right distance — a starshade — can reduce the star’s light by a factor of over 10^10, making direct exoplanet imaging possible.
We've found rocky planets around stars, capable of supporting life. Next up: time to look for biosignatures. Here's how.
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After many years, scientists are expected to say they have finally seen gravitational waves — giving Einstein a boost and opening up a whole new view of the universe, says astrophysicist Adam Frank.
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The Tarascon Pocket Pharmacopoeia is a compact medication reference book that I discovered long ago when I was in pharmacy school. The 2016 edition arrived today and while thumbing through it I was reminded how much I love biochemistry. We’ve learned a lot about the complex interplay of the chemical machinery of our bodies which has allowed us to develop drugs that treat disease and modify the function of our bodies. The primary component of these chemical machines are proteins. Proteins are made of amino acids that are linked together much like beads on a necklace. There are 22 different types of amino acids found in the human body. The type and sequence of these amino acids gives the protein strand a specific shape and function. This shape can change when it comes in contact with certain molecules (e.g. ATP) which allows the protein to perform work ranging from muscle movement to cellular pumps and gates.

One such pump is P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux transporter found on the cell membrane that pumps drugs and other substances out of cells. The picture on this post shows its crystallographic structure (I think it’s kind of pretty). In the gut, P-gp reduces drug absorption by pumping drugs into the gut lumen. In the kidneys, it increases drug excretion by pumping drugs into urine. Some drugs induce or inhibit the action of P-gp. Inhibitors can increase exposure to P-gp substrates, potentially increasing their risk of toxicity. P-gp inducers can reduce exposure to P-gp substrates, potentially increasing the risk of treatment failure. This is a type of drug interaction – when one drug increases or decrease the action of another drug. It is just one of the numerous issues that pharmacists watch for when dispensing medication to patients or advising physicians on drug therapy.

P-glycoprotein has numerous functions some of which are cellular regulation, removal of toxic metabolites, migration of dendritic cells, and transport of compounds out of the brain across the blood–brain barrier, etc, etc. But one of the more onerous functions occurs in cancer cells when P-gp is over expressed and it transports chemotherapeutic agents out of the cell. This is the cause of some cancers becoming resistant to treatment (i.e. the chemo drug can’t work if it gets pumped out of the cancer cell). Hopefully more research will be done targeting this important but sometimes detrimental protein pump in the fight against cancer.

When I step back and look at all of the chemical reactions going on inside our body, I’m in awe of the beauty that I see. It’s one part musical symphony and one part jazz concert. The players act in a coordinated, concerted effort to deal with the randomness which is inherent in the system. It’s the music of life and I find it fascinating.

Here's a nice video that will give you a feel for the conformational changes that happen while the pump operates.
https://youtu.be/T8dZwSPr8i8
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'Next time you hear a scientist saying something like "the more we know about the universe the less important we become," beg to differ. The reality is precisely the opposite: The more we know about the universe, the more unique we become. What we do with this knowledge is, of course, a personal choice for each of us. To have this choice is the privilege of being human.'
The next time you hear a scientist say something like, "The more we know about the universe, the less important we become," beg to differ: The reality is precisely the opposite, says Marcelo Gleiser.
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Explorer - Scientist - Scholar - Farmer - Family Man
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So what can I briefly say about myself? Nature fascinates me, and I am passionate about exploring it. I use the tools of science and technology to understand it, my senses to enjoy it, and photography to record it. Oh, and I love maps.

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Photography is my hobby and I'm an avid hiker and explorer. The Sierra Nevada Mountains of California and the Pacific Coast are my favorite places to visit. I have an incredible wife and two boys. My oldest son survived childhood cancer and has been cancer free since the end of 2008! I have a Doctorate in Pharmacy.
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Farmer & Pharmacist