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Scott Toste
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When I was a kid I used to dream about flying in the sky like Superman or Rocketman. In the 1960's jetpacks were built that used hydrogen peroxide powered engines. They were innately unstable and only had 30 seconds of (potential) flight. I occasionally see one of these devices still being used today, but only as a publicity stunt (last one I saw was at a Star Wars Convention). Cool, but not practical. A Swiss pilot named Yves Rossy built a jet powered wing and in 2004 strapped it to his back. Guess what? It worked. Check out the video to see some spectacular demonstrations of this incredible flying device. In 2008, he successfully flew across the English Channel in 9 minutes, 7 seconds. His speed reached 186 mph during the crossing. Since then he has—in several flights—managed to fly in a formation with three military jets and cross the Grand Canyon.

Excerpts from www.jetman.com:
"A professional pilot, Yves Rossy sought to move out of the cockpit in the continuous pursuit of flight through innovation and ingenuity to achieve mankind’s dream of engine-powered flight for humans. Drawn initially to the world of free fall, he experimented with ways to increase his flight time and enhance his ability to select his trajectory, which introduced him to sky surfing and wingsuiting."

"Still not satisfied, he developed his first real wing comprising a rigid harness integrated into inflatable wing panels that he strapped to his back. The next step was towards maintaining and gaining altitude by improving efficiency with a rigid wing and adding propulsion."

"Yves chose to go with model jet turbines, at first two of them, allowing him to maintain level flight in 2004, and then four engines in 2006. Till now, Yves Rossy has conducted winged flights over the Swiss Alps, the English Channel, the Grand Canyon and other iconic locations."

From Wikipedia:
Swiss ex-military and commercial pilot Yves Rossy developed and built a winged pack with rigid aeroplane-type carbon-fiber wings spanning about 2.4 m (8 ft) and four small kerosene-burning jet engines underneath; these engines are large versions of a type designed for model aeroplanes. He wears a heat-resistant suit similar to that of a firefighter or racing driver to protect him from the hot jet exhaust. Similarly, to further protect the wearer, the engines are modified with the addition of a carbon fibre heat shield extending the jet nozzle around the exhaust tail.

Rossy claims to be "the first person to gain altitude and maintain a stable horizontal flight thanks to aerodynamic carbon foldable wings", which are folded by hinges at their midpoint. After being lifted to altitude by a plane, he ignites the engines just before he exits the plane with the wings folded. The wings unfold while in free-fall, and he is then able to fly horizontally for several minutes, landing with the help of a parachute. He achieves true controlled flight using his body and a hand throttle to maneuver.

The system is said by Rossy to be highly responsive and reactive in flight, to the point where he needs to closely control his head, arm and leg movements in order not to enter an uncontrolled spin. The engines on the wing require precise common alignment during set-up, also in order to prevent instability. An electronic starter system ensures that all four engines ignite simultaneously. In the event of a spin, the wing unit can be detached from the pilot, and both pilot and wing unit descend to Earth on separated parachutes.
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Find the magnetic declination
at your location.
Click on the map to find the magnetic declination at your location
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The New Horizons space probe is visiting the dwarf planet, Pluto. It was launched in 2006 and has taken a little over nine years to travel this vast distance. The probe just concluded taking pictures of this distant world, and has turned it's radio dish toward Earth to send home the data it has collected. It is so far away that the transmission will take 4 hours and 25 minutes to reach our Deep Space Network antennas here on Earth. Can you imagine that? Radio waves travel at the speed of light. That's 186,282 miles per second. And it take 4.5 hours to cover that distance! That's a long, long way -- roughly 32 times further away from us than the sun. At this distance the Earth represents only the smallest sliver of space requiring a great deal of precision when aligning the probes small antenna. On top of this vast distance the data is being transmitted at a blazing-slow 1 kbit/sec. In the days that follow, New Horizons will fly past Pluto and turn it's cameras back toward the sun in order to image the dwarf planet against our star. It has a thin nitrogen atmosphere that we should be able learn something about using this imaging alignment technique. 

If you know me well, then you know how much I love space. This little "planet" was only discovered 85 years ago (that's only 35 years before I was born). As a kid I memorized the names of our nine planets and took joy in reciting it. In 2006 Pluto was downgraded to a dwarf planet because we are discovering that there are other planetoids floating around in this region of space (called the Kuiper belt). New Horizons has already shown that Pluto is the biggest of these objects and far more complex in it's makeup than we had thought.

We humans are pretty amazing creatures. We are a curious species in more ways than one. We peer into space and wonder what's out there. We build amazingly intricate devices, send them into space, and wait years for them to let us peer a little deeper into the darkness. We have many questions about our universe. It makes me happy that we seek to answer them.

Here's a little video showing hundreds of images from the space probe's mission stitched together and accompanied with a poem by Ray Bradbury. https://youtu.be/sEg4D7s3fOs
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+Scott Toste Beautiful descriptions Scott, accompany my wonderful Bradbury hangover of him reciting his way to Pluto. Thank you Scott Toste.
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Interesting.
Robert Lawrence Kuhn has a new article on Space.com about the illusion of time. What is real when it comes to time? Read to find out some perspectives from the world's leading physicists. We seem to have difficulty reconciling our understanding of time as seen through the theories of relativity and quantum mechanics, and our own, personal, subjective experience. There are no definitive answers in the article but it did help me to establish a frame work to better understand things. Do you have any thoughts on this?

#time   #physics   #relativity   #quantumphysics  
Any clock keeps time, but space-time is much harder to pin down.
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Interesting discussion about "free-will" from neurological, physical, and philosophical perspectives.
Free will seems the simplest of notions. Why then is free will so vexing to philosophers? Here's why: no one knows how free will works! Science, seemingly, permits no 'gaps'—'joints' in the structure of the world—in which free will can operate. The brain seems like an all-physical system working according to physical laws. How then a will that's fully free?
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An interesting history of computer languages (code).
The world belongs to people who code. Those who don’t understand will be left behind.
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Have him in circles
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Scott Toste

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Here's a great interview series from "Closer To Truth."

"Everything we know, think and feel—everything!—comes from our brains. But consciousness, our private sense of inner awareness, remains a mystery. Brain activities—spiking of neuronal impulses, sloshing of neurochemicals—are not at all the same thing as sights, sounds, smells, emotions. How on earth can our inner experiences be explained in physical terms?"
Everything we know, think and feel—everything!—comes from our brains. But consciousness, our private sense of inner awareness, remains a mystery. Brain activities—spiking of neuronal impulses, sloshing of neurochemicals—are not at all the same thing as sights, sounds, smells, emotions. How on earth can our inner experiences be explained in physical terms?
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Here's a great NASA video detailing the New Horizons mission.
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An interesting video showing the geographic and temporal spread of the world's five major religions.
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Interesting new swimming stroke called the "fish kick." Very efficient, very fast.
I tug my black swim cap over my hair, strap on my pink goggles, and keep a focused calm, like Michael Phelps before a race. It’s…
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A fan edited together the movies "Promethius" and "Alien." 
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David Chalmers - Towards a Science of Consciousness

Here's another video from +Closer To Truth with David Chalmers that explores frameworks in which consciousness can be studied and understood. Panpsychism seems to be a viable paradigm.

#philosophy   #consciousness   #hardproblemofconsciousness   #neuroscience  
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Have him in circles
303 people
Gabriel Pavlík's profile photo
Mike Browne's profile photo
Edgars Neimanis's profile photo
Ford Henley's profile photo
Andrea Dinsmore's profile photo
Mark Fink's profile photo
Pilar Silvestre's profile photo
James Tanner's profile photo
Mountain Photos's profile photo
Work
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Farmer & Pharmacist
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Explorer - Scientist - Scholar - Farmer - Family Man
Introduction
So what can I briefly say about myself? Nature fascinates me, and I am passionate about exploring it. I use the tools of science and technology to understand it, my senses to enjoy it, and photography to record it. Oh, and I love maps.

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Photography is my hobby and I'm an avid hiker and explorer. The Sierra Nevada Mountains of California and the Pacific Coast are my favorite places to visit. I have an incredible wife and two boys. My oldest son survived childhood cancer and has been cancer free since the end of 2008! I have a Doctorate in Pharmacy.
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Married