Profile

Cover photo
Scott Toste
318 followers|183,601 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Musk described plans to send at least a million humans to Mars and establish a self-sustaining city there. He said he expects people to reach Mars within a decade, and described four requirements for a new rocket fleet, which would travel to Mars approximately every two years, when Mars and Earth come closest to each other."
In a speech at the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico, the billionaire tech entrepreneur is detailing his vision for sending humans to the Red Planet.
1
Add a comment...

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
"In stars the force of gravity is constantly attempting to compress the star while the force of pressure is constantly attempting to balance out this compressing force. For a stable star, these two forces are equal."

"By the Fermi Exclusion Principle it is accepted that no two fermions of an atom can occupy the same energy state. This means that no two electrons can be in the same state, unless they have different spins. Also, neutrons in the nucleus cannot be in the same energy level as other neutrons."

"This means that if a star is under pressure it may be possible that this degenerate electron or neutron pressure will support the star. So, as stars begin to collapse, atoms are compressed and electrons move to lower energy states. However, as electrons fill up energy states, they reach a point that they cannot be compressed any further without two electrons being in the same state. This means that eventually degenerate electron pressure equal the force of gravity and the star becomes stable again."

"If the star is massive enough, and the force of gravity great enough, electron degenerate pressure can break down. Then, as the atoms are further compressed, degenerate neutron pressure begins to build in an attempt to counteract the force of gravity. If the neutron pressure is great enough to balance out the force of gravity than a neutron star is created. If however, the degenerate neutron pressure breaks down under the force of gravity, then a black hole is created."

"If a star is less than 1.44 solar masses then electron degeneracy will be strong enough to counter act the forces of gravity and the star will become a white dwarf. If the star is more massive than 1.44 solar masses than electron degeneracy will eventually break down and neutron degeneracy will be supporting the stellar body. This is called a neutron star. If the star is massive enough, even neutron pressure can break down. This is what occurs when black holes are formed. For neutron pressure to break down masses must be larger than about 2 or 3 times that of the sun."
Solar Mass: <1.44. Degenerate Electron Pressure Counteracts the Force of Gravity. Results in a White Dwarf. Between 1.44 and 2 or 3 Solar Masses. Degenerate Electron Pressure fails, Degenerate Neutron Pressure Counteracts the Force of Gravity. Results in a Neutron Star. Solar Mass > ~2-3.
2
1
Add a comment...

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
OSIRIS-REx, which launched today, seeks answers to the questions that are central to the human experience: Where did we come from? What is our destiny? Asteroids, the leftover debris from the solar system formation process, can answer these questions and teach us about the history of the sun and planets.

The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is traveling to Bennu, a carbonaceous asteroid whose regolith may record the earliest history of our solar system. Bennu may contain the molecular precursors to the origin of life and the Earth’s oceans. Bennu is also one of the most potentially hazardous asteroids, as it has a relatively high probability of impacting the Earth late in the 22nd century. OSIRIS-REx will determine Bennu’s physical and chemical properties, which will be critical to know in the event of an impact mitigation mission. Finally, asteroids like Bennu contain natural resources such as water, organics, and precious metals. In the future, these asteroids may one day fuel the exploration of the solar system by robotic and manned spacecraft.
The first U.S. mission to return samples from an asteroid to Earth, addressing multiple NASA Solar System Exploration objectives.
1
Add a comment...

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
Scientists like to think of science as self-correcting. To an alarming degree, it is not.

The idea that the same experiments always get the same results, no matter who performs them, is one of the cornerstones of science’s claim to objective truth. If a systematic campaign of replication does not lead to the same results, then either the original research is flawed (as the replicators claim) or the replications are (as many of the original researchers on priming contend). Either way, something is awry.

Academic scientists readily acknowledge that they often get things wrong. But they also hold fast to the idea that these errors get corrected over time as other scientists try to take the work further. Evidence that many more dodgy results are published than are subsequently corrected or withdrawn calls that much-vaunted capacity for self-correction into question. There are errors in a lot more of the scientific papers being published, written about and acted on than anyone would normally suppose, or like to think.

Various factors contribute to the problem. Statistical mistakes are widespread. The peer reviewers who evaluate papers before journals commit to publishing them are much worse at spotting mistakes than they or others appreciate. Professional pressure, competition and ambition push scientists to publish more quickly than would be wise. A career structure which lays great stress on publishing copious papers exacerbates all these problems. “There is no cost to getting things wrong,” says Brian Nosek, a psychologist at the University of Virginia who has taken an interest in his discipline’s persistent errors. “The cost is not getting them published.”
Scientists like to think of science as self-correcting. To an alarming degree, it is not
1
Add a comment...

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
We talk about the world being made of particles (electrons, protons, neutrons, quarks, etc), and then we talk about particle-wave duality. Maybe the best way to understand reality is by thinking of particles as vibrations in quantum fields.
1
Add a comment...

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
Digital Photography by Marc Levoy

Course description
An introduction to the scientific, artistic, and computing aspects of digital photography. Topics include lenses and optics, light and sensors, optical effects in nature, perspective and depth of field, sampling and noise, the camera as a computing platform, image processing and editing, and computational photography. We will also survey the history of photography, look at the work of famous photographers, and talk about composing strong photographs.

This course is based on CS 178 (Digital Photography), which I taught at Stanford from 2009 through 2014. I revised and taught the course again at Google in Spring of 2016, and these web pages are from the Google version. The course consists of 18 lectures
1
Add a comment...

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
"With new neural network architectures popping up every now and then, it’s hard to keep track of them all. Knowing all the abbreviations being thrown around (DCIGN, BiLSTM, DCGAN, anyone?) can be a bit overwhelming at first."

"So I decided to compose a cheat sheet containing many of those architectures. Most of these are neural networks, some are completely different beasts. Though all of these architectures are presented as novel and unique, when I drew the node structures… their underlying relations started to make more sense."
With new neural network architectures popping up every now and then, it’s hard to keep track of them all. Knowing all the abbreviations being thrown around (DCIGN, BiLSTM, DCGAN, anyone?) can be a bit overwhelming at first. So I decided to compose a cheat sheet containing many of those architectures. Most of these are neural networks, some are completely …
1
Add a comment...

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
Come November, the grim trudge across the increasingly barren Obamacare landscape begins anew. Illinois consumers likely face staggering price hikes for individual insurance policies. Some types of plans could cost an average of 43 percent to 55 percent more. Ditto across the country: A first tranche of states approved 2017 rates with similarly cardiac-arrest-inducing premium increases.
1
Add a comment...

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
The "declination drift method" is the most accurate way to accomplish polar alignment on an equatorial mounted telescope.
1
1
Add a comment...

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
"As flawed as our science is, it is still far and away more reliable than any other way of knowing that we have." 
1
Add a comment...

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Fresno auto show icon and hot rod legend Michael “Blackie” Gejeian, who celebrated his 90th birthday in June, died Friday. Mr. Gejeian started the world-famous Fresno Autorama Show in 1958 and it came to be billed as one of the largest custom auto shows in North America. The annual event, held in winter or early spring, celebrated muscle cars, race cars, expensive cars and unique cars. Mr. Gejeian ran it for 51 years before health concerns forced him to retire the show. Mr. Gejeian grew up on the farm in Easton, in the San Joaquin Valley, to which his family, survivors of the Armenian genocide, had immigrated decades before. After high school, Mr. Gejeian enlisted in the Navy. He went to World War II as Mike Gejeian, came back and became “Blackie.” He farmed the land his grandfather and father worked, while also learning to race on those dirt roads that helped him become a five-time NASCAR dirt track champion."

Fresno auto show icon Michael “Blackie” Gejeian, who celebrated his 90th birthday in June, died Sept. 2.
1
Add a comment...

Scott Toste

Shared publicly  - 
 
Great set of introductory astronomy videos on this YouTube Channel.
Professor of Introductory Astronomy.
1
Add a comment...
Scott's Collections
Story
Tagline
Explorer - Scientist - Scholar - Farmer - Family Man
Introduction
So what can I briefly say about myself? Nature fascinates me, and I am passionate about exploring it. I use the tools of science and technology to understand it, my senses to enjoy it, and photography to record it. Oh, and I love maps.

My website

My photography site
Bragging rights
Photography is my hobby and I'm an avid hiker and explorer. The Sierra Nevada Mountains of California and the Pacific Coast are my favorite places to visit. I have an incredible wife and two boys. My oldest son survived childhood cancer and has been cancer free since the end of 2008! I have a Doctorate in Pharmacy.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married