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Scott Stuart
Lives in Lexington, MA
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Scott Stuart

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Found on the Minuteman Bikeway this morning, in Bedford, about 100 meters NW of the intersection with Wiggins.  There was also a trail meandering through the woods and a field and crossing the bikepath several times.  The trail had an occasionally visible hoof print and an occasionally visible canine track, but was mostly too beaten down and chaotic to interpret.
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+Arun Sannuti More than 1, I suspect.
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We went out to Deer Island in the Boston Harbor this morning to see if the sunrise on the frozen sea would look interesting. It wasn't as frozen as I had hoped it would be, but it was very pretty and slushy.

Afterwards we stopped at Union Square Doughnut. I highly recommend the browned butter and hazelnut doughnut, surprisingly more so than the maple bacon doughnut, which was also quite good.
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Why will June 2015 be different from June in most years?  It will be one second longer than usual.
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...ah, no, not nearly.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_second lists them all, needless to say.  So June was this long in each of 1972, '81, '82, '83, '85, '92, '93, '94, '97, and 2012.  Huh, old news.
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The Twelve Doctors
 
The Twelve Doctor Whos: A Christmas Carol (well, not really.)
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There is now a live feed that rotates among several external cameras on the ISS.  It is sometimes very interesting to watch.  At night, much less so.  Of course, night on the ISS lasts for only about 40 minutes so you don't have too long to wait.  Also, bring up a positional tracking service (such as n2yo.com, be sure to click on "show footprint" below the map) to give you some idea of what you are seeing in the video.  So far there doesn't seem to be a way to tell which way the camera is pointing except by noticing the motion in the video.
***QUICK NOTES ABOUT HDEV VIDEO*** Black Image = International Space Station (ISS) is on the night side of the Earth. Gray Image = Switching between cameras, or communications with the ISS is not available. No Audio = Normal. There is no audio on purpose. Add your own soundtrack. For a display of the real time ISS location plus the HDEV imagery, visit here: http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/HDEV/ The High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) experiment aboar...
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A very neat story threading together the forensic ballistics of a skydiver who thought he was buzzed by a meteorite, bricks tossed around by the exhaust plume from a space shuttle launch, and samples returned from the Apollo 12 moon landing.
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Their first winter summit!
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Yup, and a pretty short hike for short-legged people.
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Here is the result of another outing to see ice in the harbor. I failed to photo the food associated s with this one, bit suffice or to say that the sausage, onion, pepper pie at Santarpio's is worth a trip.
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Finally a clear enough night to see comet Lovejoy! Binoculars required.
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The solar eruption from a few days ago should be hitting the Earth around 8pm EDT tonight.  It probably won't be visible in the Boston area, especially with light pollution and the full moon, but the sky should be very clear so looking up is worthwhile.

(Actually, full moon was a couple of days ago and the moon won't rise until after 9pm, so not too much interference there).
Forecast: Auroral activity will be high. Weather permitting, highly active auroral displays will be visible overhead from Inuvik, Yellowknife, Rankin and Igaluit to Juneau, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Thunder Bay and Sept-Iles, and visible low on the horizon from Seattle, Des Moines, Chicago, Cleveland, ...
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It appears that there might be a new very intense meteor shower in the early morning of May 24, perfectly situated for North American viewers, with minimal interference from the moon, and a Saturday as well.  Of course that means it will be raining.  The dust for this shower was spewed from one of "my" comets (209P/LINEAR) in the late 1800s, and early 1900s.  Unfortunately, there are no observations of the comet from the 1800s to get an idea of how much dust was spewed back then and the Earth has never passed through this debris before, so the intensity of the coming meteor shower is hard to predict:  it could be a dud or a storm.
A new meteor shower spawned by a comet is due to light up the sky next week, with some forecasters predicting up to 200 'shooting stars' per hour, a potentially spectacular opening act for the meteor display.
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Can I join you guys?
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Abstract from paper just released about new planet:

"We present the detection of Kepler-186f, a 1.11 ± 0.14 Earth-radius planet that is the outermost of five planets, all roughly Earth-sized, that transit a 0.47 ± 0.05 solar-radius star. The intensity and spectrum of the star’s radiation place Kepler-186f in the stellar habitable zone, implying that if Kepler-186f has an Earth-like atmosphere and water at its surface, then some of this water is likely to be in liquid form."
Starry Brightness The high photometric precision of NASA's Kepler observatory has enabled the detection of many planets because they cause slight dimming of their host stars as they orbit in front of them. From these data, Quintana et al. (p. 277) have spotted a five-planet system around a small star. Here, the outermost planet is only 10% larger than Earth and completes its 130-day orbit entirely within the habitable zone, where liquid water cou...
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If understand it correctly, the detection technique requires that the Earth happen to lie in the plane of the distant solar system. Seems like there could be many planets like 186f that are much closer, but we will not know until we develop a different way of detecting them.
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Hissing Cockroach Birth - Pt. 2
www.youtube.com

Part 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhOGQINu0lk Madagascan hissing cockroach giving birth. This video was featured on Animal Planet'