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Scott “marsroverdriver” Maxwell
Works at Google
Attended University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Lives in Pasadena, CA
46,427 followers|3,640,298 views
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+Kimberly Lichtenberg​ and I could not have hoped for a better wedding present than this. And we're honored that SCOTUS choose the perfect day for it, our own wedding day! Thanks, SCOTUS!
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Tobias Thierer's profile photoAnks D's profile photoRay Radlein's profile photoScott Lewis's profile photo
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Anks D
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Congratulations and have a happy married life!
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I actually think this is a surprisingly good list. They put the Mars rovers (collectively) at #1 and the Voyagers at #2, just as any good list should. They should've ranked MRO higher, but otherwise I don't find all that much to disagree with!
 
Wait, what?  Where is Voyager 2?  And Pioneer?
We may be dirty monkeys at heart, but humans have done some pretty astonishing things in outer space over the past 50 years. We’ve launched dozens of interplanetary spacecraft, and explored most of the solar system with space robots who sent back pictures and scientific data. Here are our favorite of those craft, ranked for your pleasure.
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Tobias Thierer's profile photoMatt McIrvin's profile photo
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...And there was the amazing, suspense-filled mission of Japan's Hayabusa asteroid probe, which managed to land on Itokawa, a minute, weird-looking rubble pile a few city blocks long, and bring back a few grains of dust to Earth, with the team working around a long series of technical malfunctions any one of which could have easily brought the whole thing to an end.
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At long last, NASA is bound for Europa. Europa is exciting because it's possibly the best bet for current life in our solar system other than the planet we're already on. And the engineering challenges are just wonderful: Jupiter's hellish radiation can't wait to wreak havoc on your puny science instruments.

Europa or bust!

(Via +Boing Boing​.)
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Looking forward to the research parameters.
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"""
It took years to design the new prototype technology, a year to refine it since the last tests, days to wait for weather suitable for a test flight, hours to gently float the craft to testing altitude, and just seconds to realize that the parachute didn’t inflate.
"""

Dang it. Better luck next time, +Mark Adler!
A flying saucer plummeted through the skies over Hawaii today in the second test of NASA’s new Mars landing system. If this had been a real flight to Mars, we’d have just killed a rover by slamming it into the planet below. This Flying Saucer Will be Plummeting Through the Skies Over Hawaii This Flying Saucer Will be Plummeting Through the Skies Over Hawaii This Flying Saucer Will be Plummeting Through the NASA is planning a series of test flight...
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http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/high-speed-at-the-edge-of-space

"Mars has an atmosphere more than one hundred times thinner than Earth's, and re-creating these high velocity, low density flows in a wind tunnel is a hugely expensive, if not impossible, task"

" In the high-speed parachute test, the parachute was deployed at Mach 0.8 (an airspeed of 250m/s) and was fully inflated in 1/20th of a second."

Just some of the hurdles i guess :)
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We can't talk to our Mars spacecraft right now because there's a giant flaming ball of gas in the way. No, not Rush Limbaugh -- the Sun.

That joke, like solar conjunction (what we call this Earth-Sun-Mars arrangement) and launch opportunities, happens about every 26 months. Typically, it's a good time for the rovers to take it easy. Logistically, it's just like planning for a very, very long weekend. In past years, for example, we've had Opportunity plant her Mossbauer instrument and just turn it on for a multi-week-long integration. No driving, and only a little science.

It's also a good time for the ops team to take it easy -- you can go on a nice long vacation without missing anything, for example. Or just catch up on email, or whatever.

Eager beaver that I am, though, I spent my first-ever solar conjunction writing some software I'd been thinking about: mPhoto, which was conceived as "iPhoto for MER." It rapidly brought up thumbnails of the latest downlinked images, and it let you see the full-size versions in (anaglyph) 3-D or composed them into uncalibrated color images. You could also save them out as PNGs or JPGs. It was a fast, broadly useful ops tool that I and others soon made a routine part of our daily work.

But this year, for solar conjunction, I'm marrying +Kimberly Lichtenberg​ instead. :-)
In June 2015, Mars will swing almost directly behind the sun from Earth's perspective, and this celestial geometry will lead to diminished communications with spacecraft at Mars. The arra
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Ciro Villa's profile photoMike Brau's profile photoRay Radlein's profile photoJ. Steven York's profile photo
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The stars aligned for your big day!
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The TSA missed 95% of weapons and bombs smuggled through airport "security" by test teams. Ninety-five percent.

The agency's defenders nearly always offer some variant of "Yes, but they keep us safe!" That was always bogus, for numerous reasons, but it's nice to now have some hard data. I wonder what those defenders will say now?

The best line in the story is the included tweet: "At $8 billion per year, the TSA is the most expensive theatrical production in history." Yup.
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Come fly with us!
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+Vishnu Vardhan Spirit was the best one! She was, indeed, my first Mars rover -- my first drive was the drive from the rock named Adirondack to the rock named White Boat.

If you have enormous amounts of free time and/or need a soporific ;-), you can read the saga of my first drive here:

http://marsandme.blogspot.com/2009/02/spirit-sol-35.html
http://marsandme.blogspot.com/2009/02/spirit-sol-36.html
http://marsandme.blogspot.com/2009/02/spirit-sol-37.html
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Have him in circles
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Ooo, I will definitely have to check this out. After the wedding.
 
Space Girls Space Women for Android
Space Girls Space Women is a new outreach initiative by +European Space Agency, ESA and other partners for presenting “the stories of girls and women passionate about space, all around the world”. It involves an exhibition, a mobile app for Android and iOS, and the website spacewomen.org 

Here’s the Android app which I’ve briefly tested on my Nexus 6 phone, see the screenshot:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ubiwhere.sgsw

The app collects the stories of the women who work in space and astronomy featured by the project. Each entry has basic biographical information, and the text and video of a short interview.

The app is also a sort of social network for women passionate about space, but I’m not sure as I haven’t tried this. Opening the app prompts you to create an account for this service but you can skip this, look for the skip button.

Finally, the app lets you take a space quiz.

For more information about the outreach initiative see:

http://blogs.esa.int/communication/2015/06/22/space-girls-space-women/

#Space #Women #Android
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+Danny Kyllo “I can calculate the motion of heavenly bodies but not the madness of people.” 
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The best rover ever, Spirit, launched to Mars 12 years ago today. I was there. Godspeed, little explorer. #freespirit

If you've never watched a launch from the perspective of the rocket, by the way, you really should. It's amazing.
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My favorite rocket in my second favorite configuration carrying my favorite rover.
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At its heart, this is an expanded version of my earlier post about using +Google Cardboard to take Google I/O conference attendees on a Martian field trip. I'm not sure there's too much in here for those of you who read that post -- but publishing on +The Planetary Society's blog is way cool, so I just had to share. :-)
Former Mars rover driver Scott Maxwell uses Google Cardboard to take a tour of the Red Planet.
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thanks for running this to ground +Scott Maxwell 
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Backed! Of course.
 
Leonard Nimoy's son Adam has launched a Kickstarter to do a documentary about his father. Check it out: http://bit.ly/LoveOfSpock
Adam Nimoy is raising funds for "For the Love of Spock" - A Documentary Film on Kickstarter! YOU can help make Adam & Leonard Nimoy's plan to create a Spock Doc come true! Watch the video, share the vision & pledge what you can!
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^ Complaining about who kickstarts what has jumped the potato-salad-eating shark-with-lasers a long time ago.
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+Marian Call covers Bowie's "Space Oddity" using only the ten hundred most common used words (David Bowie meets Up-Goer Five). It's sad that "brilliant" isn't one of those words.
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I just thought of the best one:  Hot wet air.
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People
Have him in circles
46,427 people
Robert Temple's profile photo
antonio moreno's profile photo
Chad Jackson's profile photo
Braun Harald's profile photo
Michał Gołuński's profile photo
Russell Gordon's profile photo
James Vigil's profile photo
Dr Ghosh Charitable Trust's profile photo
Monique Hebert Smith's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Site Reliability Engineer
Employment
  • Google
    Site Reliability Engineer, 2013 - present
  • JPL
    Mars Rover Driver Team Lead, 2013
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Pasadena, CA
Previously
Rocky Mount, NC - Seminole, FL - Greenville, NC - Champaign, IL
Story
Tagline
I'm a pretty big wheel down at the cracker factory.
Introduction
On a small red light in the night sky lives four hundred pounds of thinking metal sent from Earth.  Once upon a time, I told that metal what to do.

(Disclaimer: my opinions are mine, not my employer's.  Duh. :-)
Bragging rights
I fought cancer and won. I had a robot on another planet, and I drove it around and made it do stuff. I was a trending topic on Twitter. I wrote a book. I took a privacy case all the way to the Supreme Court. Now I keep Google up and running. But I'm just this guy, you know?
Education
  • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Computer Science
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
@marsroverdriver on Twitter
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reviewed 2 months ago
I love this place. The staff makes me feel like part of the family, and in a part of the world crowded with Thai restaurants, Min's stands out among the best.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
3 reviews
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Great food; great drinks; terrific wait staff. This is one of my girlfriend's and my favorite places.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago