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Scott Maentz
Joy can be experienced in all of life's circumstances if you trust God and do your best live your life in his service.
Joy can be experienced in all of life's circumstances if you trust God and do your best live your life in his service.
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Grotto Shrine of Notre Dame de Lourdes
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Any of my friends have a Google Inbox invite to share? Would love to start using it and will share any invites I get with others.

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The Diocese sponsored a Homecoming celebration at Knoxville Catholic High School to commemorate the closing of its Jubilee Year. At the conclusion of the event Bishop Stika celebrated Mass outside on the football field.
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Diocese of Knoxville Homecoming
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It's never too late to discover your gifts.

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Members of my new Knights of Columbus council visit Archbishop Kurtz in Louisville.
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Reunion and Birthday Celebration with Archbishop
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Howdy y'all! I'm back to blogging and plan to share my posts here. Here's the first in a long, long time.

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Easter Vigil at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Knoxville with Bishop Stika and Cardinal Rigali.
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2014-04-20
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Diocese of Knoxville Youth at NCYC 2013
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NCYC 2013
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Here's the video we discussed at church Sunday.
Taylor Wilson says he's designed a molten salt reactor that is proliferation and accident resistant. It's buried in the gound and runs for 30 years and is about half the price of current nuclear power. They're basically a vat or a pot of these molten salts, so they're halide salts and they have the fuel dissolved in them so your coolant and your fuel is mixed together, and you essentially extract heat from the top of this vessel. You have an active region in the reactor where the nuclear reactions are actually taking place, and because of the thermal expansion of coefficient of the salt, you actually get natural circulation through the core. So as the salt heats up, it gets less dense, it goes to the top, you remove heat, goes back through the core, gets heated up, and you get the circulation effect. And these things can't melt down. But most importantly, there's no inclination in any possible scenario for the radioactive material to leave the core. It's not under a thousand PSI of pressure like the light water reactor that we have right now, like the reactors at Fukushima. There's no chemical reactivity, no potential to generate hydrogen which can form explosive mixtures with oxygen. And so there's no potential for the radioactivity in the core to leave the core. And they can be sealed up and they run for 30 years so the proliferation threat goes away, even though there is no technically weapons-grade material in the core. And these can be delivered anywhere in the world. They're manufactured on an assembly line and delivered anywhere in the world to produce power. It's modular. It rolls off the assembly line and it's only in the range of 2 to 100 megawatts. He wants to do 50 megawatts for "distributed power" because there are efficiency losses in the grid and with renewables.

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Awesome!
Taylor Wilson says he's designed a molten salt reactor that is proliferation and accident resistant. It's buried in the gound and runs for 30 years and is about half the price of current nuclear power. They're basically a vat or a pot of these molten salts, so they're halide salts and they have the fuel dissolved in them so your coolant and your fuel is mixed together, and you essentially extract heat from the top of this vessel. You have an active region in the reactor where the nuclear reactions are actually taking place, and because of the thermal expansion of coefficient of the salt, you actually get natural circulation through the core. So as the salt heats up, it gets less dense, it goes to the top, you remove heat, goes back through the core, gets heated up, and you get the circulation effect. And these things can't melt down. But most importantly, there's no inclination in any possible scenario for the radioactive material to leave the core. It's not under a thousand PSI of pressure like the light water reactor that we have right now, like the reactors at Fukushima. There's no chemical reactivity, no potential to generate hydrogen which can form explosive mixtures with oxygen. And so there's no potential for the radioactivity in the core to leave the core. And they can be sealed up and they run for 30 years so the proliferation threat goes away, even though there is no technically weapons-grade material in the core. And these can be delivered anywhere in the world. They're manufactured on an assembly line and delivered anywhere in the world to produce power. It's modular. It rolls off the assembly line and it's only in the range of 2 to 100 megawatts. He wants to do 50 megawatts for "distributed power" because there are efficiency losses in the grid and with renewables.
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