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Scott Jenson
Works at Google
Attended Stanford University
Lives in Palo Alto, CA
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On this episode of #CoffeewithaGoogler  +Laurence Moroney chats with +Scott Jenson about the Physical Web -- what it is, what it does, and how it can enable cool new mobility scenarios.

#AndroidDev   #PhysicalWeb  
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Physical Web demo in front of IoT committee of US Congress!!!
 
The Internet of Things: Exploring the Next Technology Frontier

Yesterday, the United States House of Representatives Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade (#subCMT) hosted an Internet of Things Showcase, exploring the potential technology frontiers of the Internet of Things (IoT).

As part of the showcase, vendors demonstrated products that utilized Google open source technologies UriBeacon (http://goo.gl/xHVJpl) and The Physical Web (http://goo.gl/rN1I8E), showing the potential of enabling devices to advertise web-addresses where users can interact with the object, or where further information about the device can be found.

Following the showcase, the subcommittee held a hearing from panel of experts about the possibilities and challenges in developing the IoT, where subcommittee chair Michael C. Burgess stated “[The IoT] promises a world in which digital and physical elements communicate in real-time to predict circumstances, prevent problems, and create opportunities." 

We are excited about the opportunities the IoT presents for future products and services, and support the continuing development of open standards that facilitate ease of use while ensuring user privacy and security (goo.gl/JEYgjH). 

What future opportunities or services do you think the IoT presents?
WASHINGTON, DC – The Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade, chaired by Rep. Michael C. Burgess, M.D. (R-TX), today explored the next technology frontier: the Internet of Things (IoT). Members of the subcommittee kicked off the day at the Internet of Things Showcase where they saw ...
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Congratulations Scott +Scott Jenson a big step for your project.
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A clever demo by Sandro Paganotti, showing how to use service workers to allow a user to opt-in to a notification, even if the phone is in the user's pocket. 

What I like about this is that the Physical Web beacon still is non-intrusive, it doesn't yell at the user and beep at them. However, the web page allows the user to opt in and get that beep if they wish.

https://github.com/sandropaganotti/no-queue
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Physical Web at #cebit!
 
Thx Google for this highlight :-) We're happy our busy but successful day is over #hybrislabs   +Scott Jenson Ian is pointing at the physical web beacon here. This was live at #cebit  just a few minutes ago. Thx again!
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This is a response to Ashu Joshi's  blog about about the Physical Web. Ashu and I actually have quite a bit in common and I'm very much aligned with his overall motivations (e.g. simplicity for the user) However, by slightly misunderstanding what the Physical Web is and how it would work, his concerns are misplaced.

First I want to thank him for taking the time to reply. The whole purpose of the Physical Web project is to be open and have discussions like this so I'm very glad his post is encouraging this debate. Also, I don't expect that my answers here will cover all of his concerns so I hope we can continue this discussion if I don't properly address everything correctly. Let me take his points in order

#1. It is about Category of Devices, not individual things
He makes the point that having an app for every device is absurd, it should be about categories of devices. This is easy, I agree. I didn't mean to imply every device and I'll look into changing the wording. However, even if I have to install 10,000 apps to control a billion, my overall point is the same. Installing apps proactively is a user hassle and a roadblock. I'm a UX designer, and this project was born when I was a Creative Director at frog design where we were doing user studies, getting our clients to app to be installed. It was torture. It was tremendously hard to get clients motivated enough to run the install gauntlet. I hope we can agree that no matter the numbers, having users get to the info/app with a few clicks is better than forcing them to install (and likely uninstall later) This is especially true if in the future, we expect there to 1000s more smart devices that will be entering our lives.

#2. App-less Interaction Complicates the UX
His basic point is the bookmarks are just as complex as app. Again we mostly agree. The physical web isn't meant to be just for the 10 things you'll do every day. It's sweet spot is when you want to use something once (e.g. a mall map, a parking meter, a bus stop in a new city) In these situations we're trying to take the core value of the web, a link, and apply it to situations that would require an app today. By making it that light weight, we expect it to be used in a variety of places. In fact, much like the web is long tail, we hope the Physical Web unlocks a long tail of interaction, every device can now offer a bit of info or interaction if you want. Of course, I'm not saying bookmarks are bad, just not part of the core experience. If you indeed do you 10 things regularly then by all means, bookmark them. It clearly creates clutter, like apps do, I'm not disagreeing there but it's still easier than installing apps as you're already there, it's a simple save action.

#3. Connecting and Discovering is just the start, the real challenge is in the System
Again we agree (noticing a pattern here? ;-) The Physical Web is really just a discovery service, we often say geekily that we just a form of "Proximity DNS" that's all. You actually have to build the service for the URL to point to it. His negative example is a bus stop system. Again, I agree it's a lot of work but people ARE building these systems now and I'd rather access it through a lightweight URL linked to the exact stop I want, than I app I have to navigate to, open, and drill down to the info I need.

#4. Separate the Data from the UI
His basic point here is that using the web implies that "User Interface is embedded in the device" OK, here I'll break with my pattern, he misunderstands the tech here ;-) The device ONLY has a URL, that URL points to a server which is super easy to upgrade. 

#5. Use Cases should drive the approach
Here Ashu calls into question why a vending machine would ever use web pages when it could just use Apple Pay/GoogleWallet/etc. It's perfectly fine to quibble with the value of the vending machine, lots of people have told me they much prefer cash, etc. I actually think that using the Physical Web for a candy bar isn't likely the killer app, but it was a good example of walk up and use. As I stated earlier, this IS very much a user driven experience, we're trying to take the pain out of the user journey from "What is that?" to "I'm using it now" The long tail I spoke of earlier is where we feel the real value will be as everything is capable of offering tiny bits of information, not just apps. So yet, please criticize the vending machine, I won't fight you there. My point is that we're trying to do much more.

Finally, Ashu throws Steve Jobs at me, implying that we aren't a simple service. I'll admit, that one hurt a bit ;-) Here I don't think he really understands the user flows before/after. We offer a service that with 2 taps gets you to interaction with what you are standing in front of. All without pestering you or having any alerts annoying you in your pocket. Compare that with the steps necessary to install an app and I think we come out much MUCH simpler. We are very user driven here.

Again, in the spirt of the internet, it's so easy for things to become personal or negative. I'll reiterate that I'm very thankful for Ashu for writing his blog post for the simple reason if he feels this way, so do others. I hope it's clear this is an intellectual debate not a personal one and I fully expect Ashu to have a rebuttal to my points. I'm happy to continue the conversation. The point here isn't to take sides but to explain our sides and hopefully find common ground. Thanks again for your feedback Ashu.

Scott
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Please do continue the conversatin, looking forward to it.
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Blesh is now selling Physical Web beacons!
Physical Web is a tool to manage through the complexity of the Internet of Things. Bringing web into the real world.
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Scott Jenson

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On this episode of #CoffeewithaGoogler  +Laurence Moroney chats with +Scott Jenson about the Physical Web -- what it is, what it does, and how it can enable cool new mobility scenarios.

#AndroidDev   #PhysicalWeb  
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Physical Web demo in front of IoT committee of US Congress!!!
 
The Internet of Things: Exploring the Next Technology Frontier

Yesterday, the United States House of Representatives Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade (#subCMT) hosted an Internet of Things Showcase, exploring the potential technology frontiers of the Internet of Things (IoT).

As part of the showcase, vendors demonstrated products that utilized Google open source technologies UriBeacon (http://goo.gl/xHVJpl) and The Physical Web (http://goo.gl/rN1I8E), showing the potential of enabling devices to advertise web-addresses where users can interact with the object, or where further information about the device can be found.

Following the showcase, the subcommittee held a hearing from panel of experts about the possibilities and challenges in developing the IoT, where subcommittee chair Michael C. Burgess stated “[The IoT] promises a world in which digital and physical elements communicate in real-time to predict circumstances, prevent problems, and create opportunities." 

We are excited about the opportunities the IoT presents for future products and services, and support the continuing development of open standards that facilitate ease of use while ensuring user privacy and security (goo.gl/JEYgjH). 

What future opportunities or services do you think the IoT presents?
WASHINGTON, DC – The Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade, chaired by Rep. Michael C. Burgess, M.D. (R-TX), today explored the next technology frontier: the Internet of Things (IoT). Members of the subcommittee kicked off the day at the Internet of Things Showcase where they saw ...
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Congrats Scott, that's amazing!
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Simple Elegant Watch face recommendation?
I'm looking for a simple elegant watch face for my Moto360. I've found a few on the Play store but most of them have terrible chunky graphics. In frustration, I bought WatchMaker Pro and started making my own. 

Just curious if any other Design Fetishists out there can recommend a good, simple watch design. If it helps, I prefer analog hands with no info widgets, I don't need the date, my step count, or the humidity in Chicago. I just want a simple to read watch face that looks great.
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That's always best, +Scott Jenson​. ;-) 
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My post The Paradox of Empathy on how empathy in UX design causes problems. Our core super power, empathic thinking encourages us to whine. Instead, we should be leveling up how we talk about our observations..
#UX #UXDesign
If I’m ever asked what’s most important in UX design, I always reply “empathy”. It’s the core meta attribute, the driver…
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This twitter conversation got a bit too much for twitter:
https://twitter.com/Johannes_Ernst/status/559906958673993728

So i've moved it here to G+ so we can stop talking in Haiku. I'm inviting Johannes Ernst so we can keep going.

The basic issue was around having a semantic map file that could be used as a resource. Johannes was making the point that it had to be shared online for both ease of sharing but also so it could be 'rolled up' so my apartment could tie into the entire building.

I agree those are interesting points but not necessary. Just like having a photo you use for an avatar is uploaded multiple times, so too can a map of your apartment/house be used by multiple programs. That's not ideal of course, I'm not arguing against any type of shared online map. I'm just saying that having a single semantically rich map that any program can use as input would be a huge step forward. 

Yes, it's a bit redundant that I'd have to reupload it but that doesn't detract from the value of all IoT/home automation products can now expect and use a common file. I would go further that most apartments/homes are fairly static so uploading a file is actually quite useful for many use cases.
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So many of your context examples are way above what I'm trying to do. Nearly every home automation tool today requires a map. That's a given and the steps required to create one are crazy hard. Just having it as a graphical resource, as primitive as that is, would clearly be valuable.

Now, building on that, a marked up map would allow devices placed on that map to gain attributes (e.g. which room they are in) that is not hard or complex and is valuable.

For this discussion, I don't care at all about "X sending Y to Z"  I agree that is a really hard problem but it's not the problem I'm trying to solve. Nor is it critical to get value from a map.

I guess I can summarize my point simply: I see value in primitive systems: you are trying to solve much harder problems which a map clearly isn't adequate. But don't judge my solutions by your problems ;-)

I will stick by my point that a simple map, with simple markup in-and-of itself is insanely valuable. Does it solve most of your scenarios? No, not at all. Do I care? not really. Your scenarios are real and important but they can be tackled later. I just want to get things to connect to my wifi, in the bedroom...
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We've got a wide range of beacon images that you can build yourself (using various BLE boards) We're hoping to announce a company that will be selling beacons for purchase next week.
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Education
  • Stanford University
    Masters Computer Science, 1984 - 1986
  • Stanford University
    Economics, 1979 - 1983
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
jensen
Story
Tagline
Working on making the Physical Web happen
Introduction
Scott Jenson has been doing user interface design and strategic planning for 20 years. He worked at Apple on System 7, Newton, and the Apple Human Interface guidelines. He was the director of Symbian's DesignLab, VP of product design for Cognima, a manager of mobile UX for Google for 5 years, and a creative director at frog design in San Francisco.

As a battle scarred veteran of the software industry, Scott has shipped a consumer spreadsheet, been a part of 2 Mac OS releases, 5 Newton product cycles, 4 commercial web site revisions, designed 3 different mobile phone UIs, sworn at innumerable mobile browsers, and has over 20 patents.
Bragging rights
I'm the guy who added "Bragging rights" to G+
Work
Occupation
Product Designer
Employment
  • Google
    Product Strategy, 2013 - present
  • Jenson Design
    2012 - 2013
    Consulted for a couple of early stage startups
  • frog design inc.
    Creative Director, 2011 - 2012
  • Google
    Manager Mobile UX, 2005 - 2011
  • Jenson Design
    Principal, 2002 - 2005
  • Cognima
    Design Director, 2001 - 2002
  • Symbian Ltd.
    Director Product Design, 1998 - 2001
  • Jenson Design
    Principal, 1996 - 1998
  • Apple Inc.
    UX Designer, 1988 - 1996
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Palo Alto, CA
Previously
Minneapolis, MN - London, UK - Caen, France - Milwaukee, WI - Omaha, NE
Went there based on two lists claiming it was the best breakfast in Vegas. Service was great but the food was a bit of a let down. Their signature dish, the "Grand Cru" pancakes were built up to be these amazing over-the-top pancakes but were just basically chocolate chip pancakes. They were ok, but they were far from over the top. My wife's scrambled eggs were left under the lamp too long and were dry and hard. I'm giving it 3 stars as it *is* a decent place, maybe we just hit a bad day, but this is definitely not the 'best breakfast in Vegas'
• • •
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
Great shop, fit me in and did a simple repair quick and fast. Also made sure I understood what he was doing so I could do it myself in the future. Helpful, friendly, and clearly knows what he is doing.
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
Chicken gyro was tasty
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Small unassuming cafe, but the eggs benedict were superb. Perfectly cooked.
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago
7 reviews
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I stayed here for CES as it was the last place I could find. When I arrived: * No sheets on the bed (when pointed out, they handed me an extra sheet) * No shower curtain * Very strong chemical smell (I had to run the fan for hours) * Tiny, cheap, scratchy towels * They force you to pay upfront (never a good sign) This is a huge low rental complex for people down on their luck. The ones I talked to were very nice. However, I was propositioned in the parking lot and I was told to always close my hotel window (by a nice tenant) as there is apparently a big problem with robberies. When I asked the front desk about this issue they said not to worry as "most people here are packing"!!! While checking out I overheard the desk clerk discuss with a permanent tenant the apparently long term issue of cricket infestations. There was a list they were signing up for to get fumigated. My guess is that is what I smelled when I first checked in. On top of it all, this place costs $220/night! (with taxes and fees, it was listed at $170) They are clearly taking advantage of the huge influx of people to CES. Needless to say, next year when I go to CES, I will book earlier and never stay in this place again.
• • •
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
Excellent pizza!
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Basic, clean, 'convention hotel'. Walls a bit thin so noise was an issue. The front lobby has a 'starbucks' with crazy prices so getting a basic breakfast for your family can easily cost >$50
Quality: GoodFacilities: GoodService: Good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago