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Scott Hartman
Works at University of Wisconsin-Madison
Attends University of Wisconsin-Madison
Lives in Madison, WI
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Scott Hartman

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It may be pretty, but I sure hate fall and its evil raking.
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It is beautiful though. How's the leaf blower working?
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Spinosaurus, big and small versions, poking about a stream in Cretaceous Morocco. Someone's about to ask if these chaps should have humps or sails - head to Palaeontology Online for my thoughts on this, and read on for why it...
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+Darren Naish: did you intend your posts to be shared privately? That might explain why nobody else can see them. 
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WOW. Below is a snapshot of a mayfly derecho that was caught on radar as billions of them hatched last night and flew up to La Crosse, WI, covering everything and anything in sight.
Every year, Mayflies rise like zombies from the Mississippi River, covering everything that doesn't move in a bug blanket.
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Great googaly moogaly.
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This entry was inspired by a post at the always-excellent SV-POW. They compared the size (and neck length) of Supersaurus, Brachiosaurus and  Diplodocus. In a stroke of serendipity I read their post as I was reworking my skeletal of the largest specimen of Diplodocus, NMMNH 3690 formerly known as Seismosaurus. Let's see if that changes anything... 
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Scott Hartman

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Spinosaurus, big and small versions, poking about a stream in Cretaceous Morocco. Someone's about to ask if these chaps should have humps or sails - head to Palaeontology Online for my thoughts on this, and read on for why it...
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Fresh off the presses - a new study highlights sustained size change while tracking the pattern of character acquisition as (some) theropods evolved into birds.
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An early plant-eating dinosaur that's just as fuzzy as the bird-like theropods. That should shake up paleoart a bit more.
You've never seen a dinosaur, naturally, but you probably have a pretty good idea of what they look like. We've seen the same look over and over, across dozens of movies, books and museums: There's...
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And cute!!
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Mayr, G. & Wilde, V. (2014) Eocene fossil is earliest evidence of flower-visiting by birds. Biology Letter, 10(5): 20140223.
http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/10/5/20140223.full.pdf+html

Birds are important pollinators, but the evolutionary history of ornithophily (bird pollination) is poorly known. Here, we report a skeleton of the avian taxon Pumiliornis from the middle Eocene of Messel in Germany with preserved stomach contents containing numerous pollen grains of an eudicotyledonous angiosperm. The skeletal morphology of Pumiliornis is in agreement with this bird having been a, presumably nectarivorous, flower-visitor. It represents the earliest and first direct fossil evidence of flower visiting by birds and indicates a minimum age of 47 million years for the origin of bird–flower interactions. As Pumiliornis does not belong to any of the modern groups of flower-visiting birds, the origin of ornithophily in some angiosperm lineages may have predated that of their extant avian pollinators.
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Have him in circles
695 people
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Work
Occupation
Science consultant, writer, scientific illustrator
Employment
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Graduate Teaching Assistanc, 2013 - present
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Madison, WI
Story
Tagline
Paleontologist, Science Evangelist, Illustrator
Education
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Paleontology, present
  • University of Wyoming
    Zoology
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
July 2
Relationship
Married
Tom was professional, worked hard for 10 hours to complete the job, and offered suggestions on how we could save money relative to the initial bid. This is the third time we've used All Comfort, and while we know they are not the cheapest contractors out there, the experience has been well worth it every time.
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Some fantastic playground equipment that is accessible to kids of all physical abilities.
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