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Scott GrantSmith
Lives in Mira Mesa, CA, USA
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Scott GrantSmith

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This is guest post from Elle Dowd a candidate for ordained ministry in the ELCA. Elle was active in the Ferguson Uprising (pictured above) and an active voice in the #DecolonizeLutheranism …
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Do you see that?!?
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One of the most confusing things about cosmology on the grandest (and tiniest) scales is that it is counter-intuitive. Everyday "things" and "movement" are so easily explained and experienced on a Newtonian scale that grasping things and movement in Einsteinian and Quantum Dynamic terms is difficult. 
 
The Incredible Shrinking Universe

The Universe is getting smaller. Not the observable universe, which is currently a sphere about 93 billion light years across and increasing all the time, but the much smaller portion that we could ever hope to reach. Since the Universe is expanding, our cosmic playground is shrinking all the time.

If the Universe weren’t expanding, then the size of the observable universe would simply depend on its age. As the years go by, ever more distant light would be able to reach us. Likewise, we would be able to travel anywhere in the Universe given enough time. Even at speeds approaching that of light it might take billions of years, but the only limiting factor is time. But the Universe is expanding. It’s not that galaxies are racing away from some point in space, but rather that space itself is expanding, and that makes a big difference.

Since space itself is expanding, the more distant an object, the faster it seems to be moving away from us. We measure cosmic expansion in terms of the Hubble parameter, which is about 20 km/s per million light years. This means that two points in space a million light years apart are moving away from each other at 20 kilometers each second. Two points 10 million light years apart are moving away at 200 km/s, and so on. Because of this, if you consider two points far enough apart, they will be moving away from each other faster than the speed of light. The speed of light is about 300,000 km/s, which, given our current Hubble constant is the separation speed for two points 15 billion light years apart. This is known as the Hubble radius. Anything outside that radius is impossible for us to reach, even if we could travel toward it at the speed of light.

Some of you might protest, since you’ve been told numerous times that nothing can travel faster than light. The catch is that a galaxy 16 billion light years away isn’t actually traveling faster than light. What’s happening is that the expansion of space between us and the distant galaxy is increasing the distance between us faster than the speed of light. That subtle difference is also why we can see things that are farther away than 15 billion light years.

Because of cosmic expansion, the whole idea of galactic distance depends on your definition. As light leaves a galaxy to travel in our direction, space is expanding all along its journey. This not only causes the light to redden (known as the cosmological redshift) it makes the journey longer. All the while, the galaxy is moving even farther away. For light from the most distant galaxies, the light we observe has traveled for more than 13 billion years. When the light began its journey, its galaxy was only 3.4 billion light years away. Now the galaxy is 29 billion light years away. We can see such distant galaxy even though we’ll never reach them.

Since the observable universe is about 42 billion light years in radius, and the Hubble radius is about 15 billion light years, that means about 97% of the observable universe is beyond our reach. Furthermore, since space continues to expand, galaxies that are currently within reach will eventually move beyond the Hubble radius. Our galaxy is part of a cluster of galaxies known as the local group. It is about 10 million light years across and contains about 50 galaxies. Together they are close enough that their gravity will cause them to collapse toward each other despite cosmic expansion. But more distant clusters are so far away that cosmic expansion will win in the end. In perhaps a hundred billion years our local group will have collapsed into a single large galaxy, and the rest of the Universe will have moved forever out of reach.

Most of the universe we can observe is forever beyond our reach.
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That's completely different! Isn't it?
One of the many great comics you can read for free at GoComics.com! Follow us for giveaways & giggles.
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Don't take chances - need to consult with your acupuncturist and chiropractor
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Well? It's a suggestion. And it has its appeal.
 
It looks like candidates will campaign heavily in California since no one on the Republican side can lock up the nomination without it. A lot of people are excited. Since California is one of the last states, it rarely matters to the results. 

We should change that.

Sadly, we can hold neither the first primary nor the first caucus. The first two states have clauses in their constitutions which automatically reschedule their nominating contests. While it might be fun to force Iowa or New Hampshire to schedule their contest before the beginning of time, Nobelists with the University of California warn that it's a dangerous proposition.

Fine.

California will just hold "The Big One", a unique three-week nominating contest with no holds barred, no privacy, and no quitting.

Week one will begin in sunny Los Angeles, California with a grueling gauntlet of game shows. Candidates must show their knowledge of Federal programs in a special edition of The Price Is Right, general trivia mastery on Jeopardy!, compete in an epic rap battle, and vie to become America's Next Top Candidate. Throughout this, and all the other contests, the candidates will be subject to the whims of you, the voting public. Enter your vote at any time, change your vote at any time! In every competition there will be chances to win immunity, gain bonus delegates, and obtain one of the three coveted Vote Thief Medallions.

For week two, it's the physical competition. In stunning Santa Monica, the candidates will face off in a beach volleyball showdown before mounting bikes and riding north. In world-famous Malibu, they will compete in a surfing competition before speeding off into the mountains. Somewhere in the Transverse Ranges they will complete an obstacle course designed by California firefighters to ensure they are physically capable of dealing with any emergency. Then it's down into the Central Valley where they must work a farm from dawn to dusk.

The candidates will now pull into the heart of tech country for the mental challenge. Here they will be paired up and placed in an intensive coding bootcamp, working 'round the clock to build a product. At the end of the week, they will gather to present their proposals to a room of California's most skeptical tech voters. Once more, you, the voting public, will be able to signal your favorites and even submit video questions, criticisms, or general trolling to the candidates as they sweat it out in The Demon Round.

Finally, the candidates will gather at the San Andreas Fault where The Big One will be announced. It is at this moment that candidates will be able to steal delegates from each other as they see their national approval numbers updated live. Any candidate who wins (or steals) two of three nominating contests while still holding immunity can take it all and raise the ire of voters nationwide as they steal an election and become The Big One.

It will be simultaneously the most and least democratic nominating contest in the United States.
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The Bubble Nebula

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope turned 26 years old last week and astronomers released imagery of an immense bubble being blown into space by a a super-hot, massive star. The stellar wind of hot gases released by the star moves at over four million miles per hour and sweeps up the cold, interstellar gas in front of it, forming the outer edge of the bubble.

The Bubble Nebula is seven light-years across and 7,100 light-years away from the Earth in the constellation Cassiopeia. It was discovered in 1787 by William Herschel, a prominent British astronomer. Hubble's Wide Field Camera-3 imaged the nebula with unprecedented clarity in February 2016 and was used to create this animated flythrough.

Source: http://goo.gl/cEGKHw (NASA)

#ScienceGIF #Science #GIF #NASA #Hubble #Space #Telescope #BubbleNebula #Bubble #Nebula #Star #Gas #Astrophysics #Astronomy
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Have them in circles
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Three of my favorite flavors!
Looking for a new homemade dessert to satisfy your sweet tooth? One that’s fancy enough to serve at a dinner party, but can also be thrown into a backpack on your next hike? T...
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A +Google Glass enthusiasts gathering in Carlsbad.
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Doing cartwheels to celebrate the end of an era



An image of the Cartwheel Galaxy taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has been reprocessed using the latest techniques to mark the closure of the Space Telescope European Coordination Facility (ST-ECF), based near Munich in Germany, and to celebrate its achievements in supporting Hubble science in Europe over the past 26 years. 

Astronomer Bob Fosbury, who is stepping down as Head of the ST-ECF, was responsible for much of the early research into the Cartwheel Galaxy along with the late Tim Hawarden — including giving the object its very apposite name — and so this image was selected as a fitting tribute. The object was first spotted on wide-field images from the UK Schmidt telescope and then studied in detail using the Anglo-Australian Telescope.

Lying about 500 million light-years away in the constellation of Sculptor, the cartwheel shape of this galaxy is the result of a violent galactic collision. A smaller galaxy has passed right through a large disc galaxy and produced shock waves that swept up gas and dust — much like the ripples produced when a stone is dropped into a lake — and sparked regions of intense star formation (appearing blue). The outermost ring of the galaxy, which is 1.5 times the size of our Milky Way, marks the shock wave’s leading edge. This object is one of the most dramatic examples of the small class of ring galaxies.

This image was produced after Hubble data was reprocessed using the free open source software FITS Liberator 3, which was developed at the ST-ECF. Careful use of this widely used state-of-the-art tool on the original Hubble observations of the Cartwheel Galaxy has brought out more detail in the image than ever before. 

Although the ST-ECF is closing, ESA’s mission to bring amazing Hubble discoveries to the public will be unaffected, with Hubblecasts, press and photo releases, and Hubble Pictures of the Week continuing to be regularly posted on spacetelescope.org.



Credit:

ESA/Hubble & NASA


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+Zach Wahls and his sister are making The Woman Card[s]. I'm the 20th backer!
If Hillary is playing the woman card, this is the deck she's using.
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That is some serious bling on that seahorse!
 
Woah! The giant Pacific seahorse can grow to over a foot tall! This stunning syngnathid is one of the stars of our newest special exhibition ¡Viva Baja! Life on the Edge: http://mbayaq.co/1R7TiVX
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Scott's Collections
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Have them in circles
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Currently
Mira Mesa, CA, USA
Previously
Leucadia, CA, USA - Spirit Lake, IA, USA
Story
Tagline
Visionary Wannabe/Wannabe Visionary
Introduction
Enjoys life and family. Plays Aikido. Uses PCLinuxOS and Android. Shoots Canon. Is Unitarian Universalist. Supports Marriage Equality. Eats Meat. Explores Google Glass
Work
Skills
Level 10 Ingress Resistance Agent
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Only game in town. Traffic is often bad. Use the cell phone lot to avoid circling like a vulture in the pick-up line.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
A liberal and welcoming congregation.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Tasty burgers and chocolate shake. Lots of burger options and reasonably quick.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Fuddruckers gives you exactly what you'd expect. Good burgers, all the condiments you could want, bottomless drinks. Busy but not noisy. Plenty of seating.
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
23 reviews
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A lovely, grassy park with several good shade trees. Parking is a bit thin but street parking is available. The "Pioneer" part is the collection of headstones (and collective graves?) of some old cemeteries consolidated here to free up land around the city quite a few years ago.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
A good movie theater with 18 screens. Can get pretty crowded depending on how many ticket windows they have open and whether they have one or two ticket takers.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Very good! In fall, try the Pumpkin Down, a Scottish ale with a fine scent of spices and a lovely flavor - a good dessert beer. Also, the Victory At Sea imperial stout will knock your socks off! The food is high quality and tasty. Will return.
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago