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Scott Fulton III
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Scott Fulton III

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The reason I often choose to drive long distances rather than fly is because it ends up being faster, or at least it typically does.  It often takes more time for me to clear up the transactional mess surrounding my booking a flight, than I actually spend in the air.  But last week, I discovered a dark corner of the logistics world that had not evolved in close to 30 years.

http://www.fierceenterprisecommunications.com/story/top-reason-communications-systems-break-down/2014-03-19
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Join me and +Carmi Levy at 12:30 ET on The Mobility Hub.  Subject... uh, what do you think?  How to Reassemble #BlackBerry  
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Evolution with a Capital 'R'

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Thus far, cloud dynamics has not quite changed everything about the global nature of business or the economy.  We have yet to awaken and find ourselves in a Technicolor Land of Oompa-Loompas where the rules of the modern economy have been whimsically rewritten by elves.  It’s premature to declare “cloud” the subject of a revolution.  Historically, only successful events have been worthy of the moniker.  The English monarchy would not be referring to the American Revolution as such, had it not been completely and brilliantly successful.

Can cloud dynamics become revolutionary, however?  Yes.  Most of the basic ingredients are there.  The formula is in place for achieving widespread and sweeping improvement to the way we work. Whether history will judge the still-emerging concept as revolutionary will depend not upon how much has been disrupted, but instead upon how much the resulting reformation yielded measurable, lasting improvement.  Disruptions are pointless unto themselves.
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DFSCOTT is alive and well and bouncing around the realm of big data.

If you remember the heady days, or even the footy days, of the 1980s - and those long, late-night text chats on GEnie and Delphi (we called them COs back then, for Delphi's command for "conference") - you'll recall we chatted about amazing new things like a graphical communications web and a shared computing grid.  There was also an interesting topic that nobody saw coming:  What will happen when databases expand in size beyond the capability of storage volumes.  When data gets too big for its britches?

Well, here we are a quarter-century later, and enterprises find themselves asking this question.  Again.

Join me, my ten rapid-fire fingers, and my guest Ted Dunning, senior application architect at MapR, as we revive the topic of Big Data: The First Quarter-Century.  We're on The Transformed Datacenter Wednesday afternoon at 12:00 pm ET / 9:00 am PT.  Here's the details:

http://www.transformeddc.com/author.asp?section_id=2869&doc_id=264884&
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Have him in circles
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Scott Fulton III

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This tune has been tucked away in the back of my mind ever since I was 7.  Watching NBC's coverage from Sochi, I was thinking about how the bombastic theme music of today contrasts with this down-home, mountain bluegrass tune they used in '72.  It had not occurred to me until now (although it certainly should've) that John Denver wrote this piece.  Thanks so much for finding it and posting this piece of history from one of America's greatest musicians.
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How to Reassemble BlackBerry Without Making a Single Smartphone

I purchased my last BlackBerry a few months before it was generally revealed that something called an iPhone would be released early the following year.  I proudly tacked my sporty red 8830 World Edition to my belt.  One day, as I walked past the first class passengers on a plane in what USAirways intentionally contrives to be the "Gauntlet of Shame," several stockbrokers noticed my new toy.  It took several minutes for the steward to reseat them.

Just two months later, I was on a different flight home, and had just phoned my wife before the plane began taxiing.  The fellow seated next to me asked, "You still gonna keep that now?"

That the consumer is notoriously fickle, is the topic of several analyses that emerged as "low-hanging fruit" in the aftermath of BlackBerry's news on Monday that it would take itself private.  True, companies do tend to continue producing products and services in the wake of extreme consumer apathy, but that never stopped NBC.  BlackBerry bet everything it had on a notion that at least some consumers, and many businesses, would remain loyal.  When it lost, the analysts blamed BlackBerry, as if it had missed reading the obituary for optimism.

Sometimes a company has to pick itself up, dust off the remnants of the debris, attend its own funeral, and prove the inexplicability of the rumors of its death.  If you've done this sort of thing once or twice already, it gets easier, trust me.  Suppose BlackBerry truly does have a winning hand left over.  How does it play that hand?

http://www.themobilityhub.com/author.asp?section_id=2451&doc_id=268151&
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Humans aren't the only designers who experiment with brilliant ideas.
 
Creature with Interlocking Gears on Legs Discovered

Gears are ubiquitous in the man-made world, found in items ranging from wristwatches to car engines, but it seems that nature invented them first.

A species of plant-hopping insect, Issus coleoptratus, is the first living creature known to possess functional gears, a new study finds. The two interlocking gears on the insect's hind legs help synchronize the legs when the animal jumps.

"To the best of my knowledge, it's the first demonstration of functioning gears in any animal," said study researcher Malcolm Burrows, an emeritus professor of neurobiology at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.

Burrows and a colleague captured the gears' motion using high-speed video. As the young bug prepares to leap, it meshes the gear teeth of one leg with those of the other, like cocking a gun. Then, the insect releases its legs in one smooth, explosive motion.

Image: Malcolm Burrows
[See Video: http://goo.gl/CcZhLz ]
Full article: http://goo.gl/a0wuDB
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Cloud Dynamics

With this latest series for Tom's IT Pro, I begin a broader discussion on the subject of how resource pooling changes businesses.  More to the point, I talk about how the extent to which the way we work is changing, as a result of new technologies that enable us to procure computing power a la carte without purchasing the whole power plant first.

http://www.tomsitpro.com/articles/cloud-dynamics-cloud-services-consumerization-of-it,2-597.html

I'm going to just say it.  For three decades now, I've read the usual pabulum about how the waves of change, the dawn of new eras, the rush of new technologies, and all the things that are changing, changing us into different people than we were five minutes ago.  And its a lot of, to borrow Joe Biden's superb vernacular, malarkey.  Technology has never changed us.  Not once.  Humanity has always pooled its resources to leverage machines that maximize the productivity and effectiveness of work.  Always.  Every idea we've ever had that hasn't been about sex, has been ultimately for that purpose.  Even handwriting was devised as a way of taking inventory.

When the way we work changes, it is because of an underlying evolution in who we are as a people and as a culture.  We are the undercurrent; technology is the by-product.

Cloud dynamics is my term for the concept of pooling work itself into a marketable commodity.  Not the machine, not the device, not the thingie with the touchscreen in your pocket.  Units of work that are made available through a global marketplace.  The idea that what we do has more value than what we do it with, is changing the nature of business, and altering the infrastructure of information technology.  Not the other way around.

So what does this matter?  Because we, the people, are responsible for this -- we're in the driver's seat, we're the one's steering the wave of change.  And if we sit back and expect it to happen to us, like some "immersive experience," it could all die out and we could miss this opportunity.

SF3
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There's a simmering debate in Internet circles over whether the accelerating adoption of IPv6 addresses leads to a threat to net neutrality.  The argument goes like this:  By enabling IP packets to be encoded with quality of service (QoS) metadata, IPv6 gives network engineers a tool for distinguishing classes of service from one another.  This could lead to routers giving priority to video streams versus, say, RSS feeds or e-mail contents.

And this is a bad idea because... uh... I'm sorry, I've lost what was supposed to be evil about this.

http://www.transformeddc.com/author.asp?section_id=2755&doc_id=264644
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Globally recognized author and editor on information technology and its relationship to people
Introduction
Since 1984, I've been a published author and online services editor.  My wife Jennifer and I run the editorial services provider Ingenus LLC, which manages projects for publishers in information technology, higher education, software publishing, and cloud business services.
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17 books, 3,000+ articles
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Published as D. F. Scott (1984 - 1999)