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Scott Foust
Works at Learning Sciences Institute at ASU
Attended Art Institute of San Francisco
Lives in Phoenix, AZ
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Scott Foust

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Didn't know this was a thing. Way to go girl!
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Scott Foust
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Questions and Possible Issues  - 
 
Resource Distribution: In a post scarcity economy, I suspect that resources would be distributed based on need. What happens when several groups all claim they have the greatest need for a particular resource. For example, a new rare element is discovered. Three groups all say, on a scale from 1 to 10, they all rate their need at an 11. The resource can't be split up (there is only enough for one application). 

What guide lines should such a society adopt for resolving such situations?
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Scott Foust's profile photoCristian Andrei's profile photoJacky Ko's profile photo
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Voting is not optional in Australia (get a fine if you don't vote), so a political party may "friend" the media to target grass root voters who can be "persuaded" more easily by loaded headlines and biased opinion.

Since everyone think that they understand the issue, excluding some from voting will create conflicts, especially for those who have an interest in the subject matter.

What I'm thinking is a "scientific process" that will produce a non-biased outcome, IF (a big if) we can prevent the process from being influenced by interest groups.
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Scott Foust
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Discuss this community  - 
 
Wahoo, I one of us now!
(Thanks for setting this up!)
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Thanks +Cristian Andrei for creating this place. I'm honoured to be invited. I'm sure what we're doing now means something for our children.
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Scott Foust

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Super news. A probe launched in 2004 is about about to attempt an asteroid landing!!
 
Rosetta the comet chaser : I posted earlier about the ESA Rosetta being awakened after a long 'sleep' period (http://goo.gl/GWjGYo). The comet chaser is now set to make history as the first robotic spacecraft to make a landing on a comet streaking though space.

Article Extract: It has been a long trip for Rosetta. On March 2, 2004, the European Space Agency probe was launched to rendezvous with a comet streaking along at 24,600 mph. Scientists hope that Rosetta will be a codebreaker like its namesake, the ancient tablet that gave scholars the key to deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphics.

Rosetta spent the first seven years of its mission getting into a position where it could eventually intercept its target, Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. After four gravity assists and two asteroid flybys, mission engineers sent the spacecraft coasting on a 957-day hibernation in deep space. On January 20, Rosetta got a wake-up call. Now the bright-eyed spacecraft is making the final approach to its destination for a rendezvous. As Rosetta approaches the sun, its solar arrays will produce more power, though only gradually, so activating the spacecraft “will be an incremental process,” says Matt Taylor, who chairs the mission’s science team. Rosetta is the only spacecraft to travel such a distance—now more than 3.8 billion miles—using only solar arrays as a power source.

Article Link: http://www.airspacemag.com/space/rosetta-comet-chaser-180950138/?all

Pic from article in airspacemag.com : Rosetta will begin mapping comet 67 P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August of this year. (ESA-C. Carreau / ATG Medialab)

#rosetta #comet #esa #cometchaser  
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Scott Foust

Diskussion  - 
 
Or, what will we do when robots have all the physical jobs? Hopefully it has something to do with TVP.
 
+Charlie Stross has a challenging and very interesting essay asking the question: Why should we work?

http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2014/04/a-nation-of-slaves.html

We tend to talk around this issue a lot, but a key issue is this: as productivity (the amount of stuff of value we can create per hour of work) goes up, how much of that increase do we put in to increasing the amount of stuff of value we create, and how much do we put into decreasing the amount of work we do -- or put another way, what's the value of leisure?

Another way to look at this is to consider an extreme limit. Say that tomorrow, someone invented a couple of Magic Boxes. One of them lets you pour cheap raw materials (dirt, rocks) in one end, push a button, and anything you request, from a hamburger to a car, comes out the other end. Another one will answer any question you ask, organize anything you need organized, do research for you, synthesize the data, explain things to you, and so on. A third one will pick up any physical item and take it anywhere in the world you need to be. If it's not obvious, these magic boxes are just the limits of technology we already have.

Now in this post-Magic Box world, a lot of good things happen. For one thing, magic boxes themselves are cheap, because they can be made by magic boxes. (Someone will try to ban that, of course, and this will work about as well as banning people from humming songs) It's hard to go hungry when you can just dump dirt into your magic box and get a meal. Likewise, any clothing, shelter, and medicine you might need is just there, and another magic box can help you figure out which things will help you satisfy your needs. If you can afford the cheapest magic box, you can have the riches of Croesos.

On the other hand, you might notice that a huge fraction of all jobs in the world would cease to exist as well. Almost the entire manufacturing, service, logistics, or information sectors would cease to exist. Pretty much the only jobs remaining would be to come up with new designs to fit in to the magic boxes -- and it's not hard to imagine that magic boxes could do a lot of that, too. 

If we kept running the world the way we do now -- the way it would happen if someone literally invented these boxes tomorrow -- then we would find ourselves in a very strange state. Having successfully pushed productivity to infinity, and eliminated all possible cause for want in the world, almost everyone in the world would be suddenly unemployed, unable to access a magic box, and would starve to death.

This is obviously stupid.

The flaw in this, of course, is that our tendency to tie work to access to resources makes no sense in a world where the total amount of actual work to be done is much less than the total number of people around to do it. In this post-Box world, there simply aren't enough jobs for everyone.

That's not a bad thing for the basic reason that Stross explains. Most jobs aren't things you would want for their own sakes. Consider: If you suddenly inherited £100M, would you stay in your job? If you would -- if you would do this job even if it had nothing to do with earning money -- then your job is actually worth something to you in its own right, and you would probably keep doing it in a post-Box world. If, on the other hand, you would leave your job immediately, then your job has no value of its own to you: it exists only as a means to an end, and as soon as you have a better means, you're out of there.

The reason this is important is that we're already in the early days of the Magic Box Economy. When we see jobs disappearing around the world and not being replaced by new jobs -- entire trade sectors vanishing -- and the overall actual unemployment rate (not the rate of people looking for work, but the rate of people who aren't working for pay at all) rising, but at the same time overall global productivity is increasing, what we're seeing is that many of the jobs which used to be necessary for us as a species to survive are simply no longer needed. 

However, our economy, and our thinking about the economy, continues to be based on the idea that jobs are good, and working is good, and if you aren't trying to work harder, something must be wrong with you. Which means that, as people's jobs become completely obsoleted, with no useful "retraining" available since the total number of jobs has permanently gone down, we conclude that these people must therefore be drains on our society, and cut them off from the magic box, even though a surprisingly small amount of money is (in our semi-Box economy) already enough to survive.

What I've talked about above is the problem -- namely, how to manage the transition between a work-based economy and a magic box economy. There have been many solutions proposed to this, and I'm not going to go into all of them now. (For the record, I suspect that the "universal basic income" approach is probably the simplest and best solution, although my mind is by no means made up)

But it's come time to start thinking about this: As our wealth goes to infinity, how do we avoid starving to death?

(Image by ILO/Aaron Santos: https://flic.kr/p/hJVSyL)
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Scott Foust's profile photoa gypsyranger's profile photoDoreen S's profile photo
6 comments
 
I would say that in such a case, people would find to themselves, with full awareness back to origin, back to nature, back to consciousness, spirituality and FREEDOM. People will be able to be what we supposed to be - HUMAN! FREE HUMAN!

Remember: we are not human beings on a spiritual journey, but we are spiritual beings on a human journey.

That day when people are free, then we will find the planet, we all want to see.. And yeah we know that we can achieve it when we use our technology wisely...

And I believe that there will be no such questions about what will we do, if machines and robots do "our" jobs... You will find the answer only within yourself... Live, love, laugh ;)) explore yourself, explore nature, explore the universe, the "answers" are everywhere in space and time...

I could go much deeper now but I'll leave it as that...

Have a wonderful day guys...
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Scott Foust

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Or, what will we do when robots have all the physical jobs? Hopefully it has something to do with freeing people up to do what they WANT to do rather than what they HAVE to do.
 
+Charlie Stross has a challenging and very interesting essay asking the question: Why should we work?

http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2014/04/a-nation-of-slaves.html

We tend to talk around this issue a lot, but a key issue is this: as productivity (the amount of stuff of value we can create per hour of work) goes up, how much of that increase do we put in to increasing the amount of stuff of value we create, and how much do we put into decreasing the amount of work we do -- or put another way, what's the value of leisure?

Another way to look at this is to consider an extreme limit. Say that tomorrow, someone invented a couple of Magic Boxes. One of them lets you pour cheap raw materials (dirt, rocks) in one end, push a button, and anything you request, from a hamburger to a car, comes out the other end. Another one will answer any question you ask, organize anything you need organized, do research for you, synthesize the data, explain things to you, and so on. A third one will pick up any physical item and take it anywhere in the world you need to be. If it's not obvious, these magic boxes are just the limits of technology we already have.

Now in this post-Magic Box world, a lot of good things happen. For one thing, magic boxes themselves are cheap, because they can be made by magic boxes. (Someone will try to ban that, of course, and this will work about as well as banning people from humming songs) It's hard to go hungry when you can just dump dirt into your magic box and get a meal. Likewise, any clothing, shelter, and medicine you might need is just there, and another magic box can help you figure out which things will help you satisfy your needs. If you can afford the cheapest magic box, you can have the riches of Croesos.

On the other hand, you might notice that a huge fraction of all jobs in the world would cease to exist as well. Almost the entire manufacturing, service, logistics, or information sectors would cease to exist. Pretty much the only jobs remaining would be to come up with new designs to fit in to the magic boxes -- and it's not hard to imagine that magic boxes could do a lot of that, too. 

If we kept running the world the way we do now -- the way it would happen if someone literally invented these boxes tomorrow -- then we would find ourselves in a very strange state. Having successfully pushed productivity to infinity, and eliminated all possible cause for want in the world, almost everyone in the world would be suddenly unemployed, unable to access a magic box, and would starve to death.

This is obviously stupid.

The flaw in this, of course, is that our tendency to tie work to access to resources makes no sense in a world where the total amount of actual work to be done is much less than the total number of people around to do it. In this post-Box world, there simply aren't enough jobs for everyone.

That's not a bad thing for the basic reason that Stross explains. Most jobs aren't things you would want for their own sakes. Consider: If you suddenly inherited £100M, would you stay in your job? If you would -- if you would do this job even if it had nothing to do with earning money -- then your job is actually worth something to you in its own right, and you would probably keep doing it in a post-Box world. If, on the other hand, you would leave your job immediately, then your job has no value of its own to you: it exists only as a means to an end, and as soon as you have a better means, you're out of there.

The reason this is important is that we're already in the early days of the Magic Box Economy. When we see jobs disappearing around the world and not being replaced by new jobs -- entire trade sectors vanishing -- and the overall actual unemployment rate (not the rate of people looking for work, but the rate of people who aren't working for pay at all) rising, but at the same time overall global productivity is increasing, what we're seeing is that many of the jobs which used to be necessary for us as a species to survive are simply no longer needed. 

However, our economy, and our thinking about the economy, continues to be based on the idea that jobs are good, and working is good, and if you aren't trying to work harder, something must be wrong with you. Which means that, as people's jobs become completely obsoleted, with no useful "retraining" available since the total number of jobs has permanently gone down, we conclude that these people must therefore be drains on our society, and cut them off from the magic box, even though a surprisingly small amount of money is (in our semi-Box economy) already enough to survive.

What I've talked about above is the problem -- namely, how to manage the transition between a work-based economy and a magic box economy. There have been many solutions proposed to this, and I'm not going to go into all of them now. (For the record, I suspect that the "universal basic income" approach is probably the simplest and best solution, although my mind is by no means made up)

But it's come time to start thinking about this: As our wealth goes to infinity, how do we avoid starving to death?

(Image by ILO/Aaron Santos: https://flic.kr/p/hJVSyL)
1
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Scott Foust

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Thanks +Joe Smith. I totally forgot to stay up for this.
 
Blood Moon eclipse from last night!
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Scott Foust
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Research Material & Resources  - 
 
An interesting place to start might be by collecting to similar ideas or document to use as a jumping off points.

https://www.google.com/search?q=post+scarcity+society
https://www.google.com/search?q=post+scarcity+constitution

And maybe create a section for post scarcity questions where the group can explore solutions that then later can be captured in a best-solutions-so-far document.
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2 comments
 
Great starting point +Scott Foust. I like reading and these links will feed me for a while. Thanks!
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Scott Foust

Great Projects, Concepts & Movements...  - 
 
New city design and reconfiguration article. Good to see this happening around established cities also.
 
It’s time to change the narrative about urban design. It’s not about building more roads or luxury apartment complexes; it’s about creating cities that are safer, more livable and healthier for a growing number of residents.

http://ecowatch.com/2014/04/08/sustainable-design-cities-safe/ *
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I'm safe for now. But I'm lucky enough to have a job that I would do even in TVP.
 
"Will A Robot Take Your Job?" has been turned into an infographic.
Look quick, before a drone comes to deliver the pink slip.
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Scott Foust's profile photoDomenico Mongelli's profile photoTim Schmidt's profile photo
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+Domenico Mongelli Sorry, you'll have to ask the author's of the graphic for sources (was it Oxford University?).
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People
Have him in circles
271 people
Steve Swink's profile photo
Scott Jacobs's profile photo
Jacky Ko's profile photo
Ralf Knoesel's profile photo
Matt Small's profile photo
Brenden Sewell's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Video Game Development - Tech Art Generalist
Employment
  • Learning Sciences Institute at ASU
    Tech Art Generalist, 2011 - present
  • Art Institute - Sacramento CA
    Instructor, 2011 - 2011
  • SEGA Studio
    Tech Art Generalist, 2007 - 2010
  • Perpetual Entertainment
    Software Enginer One (Tools Development), 2006 - 2007
  • Stormfront Studios
    Senior Artist and Animator, 1994 - 2003
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Phoenix, AZ
Previously
San Francisco Bay Area
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Contributor to
Story
Tagline
I have a need to build and create. Currently, to build games that educate and tools for creating.
Introduction
I've been in the video game development industry since 1995. I've done work on both the technical and artistic sides of the creation process.

In recent years, my interests have pulled me toward the idea of using video games to teach. How cool would it be if games replaced (or heavily supplemented) text books in the class? If students are having fun, I believe they will play (study) longer and retain more.

How about games in the gym? I'd love to play a social game using my exercise bike (flying my peddle powered hang-glider over an enemy village).
Bragging rights
Played "Guitar Hero" on the San Francisco Giants score board!! (well, me and everyone else at the SEGA Christmas party that year).
Education
  • Art Institute of San Francisco
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Had a nice hardy meal here made with very fresh ingredients. $9 all you can eat eat including drink.
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Just stopped in at Chandler BBQ Company for a quick lunch and really liked what I found. Had the rib tips with slaw and greens. Tips were so tender that I didn't need a knife (stab, twist, and came apart). The greens even came with a little pulled pork on top (each bite with a little of the pork made for a great combination). The service was very good. The staff (maybe the owner) was very attentive to everyone). If you're in the area, give them a try.
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
time here and it was a great experience. Lots of choices on the menu. Yet, there wasn't a combo for what I wanted; thick sliced beef brisket with sweet potato fries. They were kind enough to combine them for a dollar less then if I bought them separately. Great sauce, great brisket, and crispy fries. I'll be back. Edit: I've been back many times. The thick slices brisket is with slaw is my favorite! I keep coming back!
Food: Very goodDecor: GoodService: Very good
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Really great real espresso bar! Two well pulled shots with a little cream made me a happy man.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
25 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Don't let the "Sell Us Your Gold" sign outside scare you off. Inside, this coffee bar has a very nice atmosphere. Espresso drinks are served in porcelain cups for those who choose to stay and enjoy. Nice seating and appropriate music. Secure WiFi is also available (most places, like Starbucks, have unencrypted WiFi). I will definitely be returning to this establishment. Update: I've been here a number of times now. Still a very good experience. So, if Starbucks has no room for you and your laptop, come here.
• • •
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
The crust is perfect and the sauce is amazing. Best pizza I've EVER had (including the one I had in an amazing outdoor cafe in France).
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
This place is always busy at lunch (so they are doing something right) For me, the ribs, chicken, and sausage are the best choice. However, the beef brisket always disappoints me because it's served shredded (try Andrew's for thinks sliced brisket). Also, the 'slaw has way too much mayo for my taste. They have two items on their menu which sound good but that I haven't tried, "Smoked Salmon Salad" and "Pit Ham". I'll update my rating when I do.
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago