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Scott Draves
Works at Two Sigma Investments
Attended Brown University
Lives in New York
1,951 followers|747,950 views
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Beaker Notebook v1.3 released, get it from http://BeakerNotebook.com

This release supports SparkR, has a much-improved UI, and includes Clojure and Kdb support.  There is much more but I haven't written the release notes yet, more info coming soon.
Beaker is a notebook-style development environment for working interactively with large and complex datasets. Its plugin-based architecture allows you to switch between languages or add new ones with ease, ensuring that you always have the right tool for any of your analysis and visualization needs.
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"But back to Iraq: the crucial thing to understand is that the invasion wasn’t a mistake, it was a crime. We were lied into war. And we shouldn’t let that ugly truth be forgotten."
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+Wendy Walcott Trying to stay on the surface ,cuz nobody read "papers" anymore. NYT become more like yellow press.People busy to take photos and share them 24/7 lol 
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I gave a lecture about data art and my work to the +Synapse School (Six Seconds).  Fun to see the reaction of the next generation. Where will they take it?
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Scott will soon be virtually present on two-legged monitors all over the world. BeamPro by Suitable Technologies https://www.suitabletech.com/beampro/
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Scientific & Mathematics  - 
 
Beaker v1.2 has been released.  Download now from http://BeakerNotebook.com.  Among many improvements, Beaker v1.2 has:

 • Support for Java and Scala, including sharing classes with Groovy.
 • Support for running Python2 and Python3 at the same time.
 • A better method of finding and configuring language backends.
 • Support for Processing via p5.js.
 • New APIs for reflection, scripting, and dashboards.
 • Works with old Mac hardware and old Mac operating systems.
 • Standard output and error output now appear below the cell that produced them instead of in a unified panel.
 • Too many performance and bug fixes to count.
Beaker is a notebook-style development environment for working interactively with large and complex datasets. Its plugin-based architecture allows you to switch between languages or add new ones with ease, ensuring that you always have the right tool for any of your analysis and visualization needs.
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Scott Draves

Announcement  - 
 
Beaker v1.2 has been released.  Download now from http://BeakerNotebook.com.  Among many improvements, Beaker v1.2 has:

 • Support for Java and Scala, including sharing classes with Groovy.
 • Support for running Python2 and Python3 at the same time.
 • A better method of finding and configuring language backends.
 • Support for Processing via p5.js.
 • New APIs for reflection, scripting, and dashboards.
 • Works with old Mac hardware and old Mac operating systems.
 • Standard output and error output now appear below the cell that produced them instead of in a unified panel.
 • Too many performance and bug fixes to count.
Beaker is a notebook-style development environment for working interactively with large and complex datasets. Its plugin-based architecture allows you to switch between languages or add new ones with ease, ensuring that you always have the right tool for any of your analysis and visualization needs.
1
Add a comment...
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Electric Sheep Android App & Live Wallpaper updated: fixes in-app payments, fixes battery saver mode, adds daydream. Get it now: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.spotworks.electricsheep
The official Electric Sheep application for Android, and winner of a ZKM ap...
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An impossible dream

Kepler, the guy who discovered that planets go in ellipses around the Sun, was in love with geometry.  Among other things, he tried to figure out how to tile the plane with regular pentagons (dark blue) and decagons (blue-gray).  They fit nicely at a corner... but he couldn't get it to work.

Then he discovered he could do better if he also used 5-pointed stars!

Can you tile the whole plane with these three shapes?  No!  The picture here is very tempting... but if you continue you quickly run into trouble.  It's an impossible dream.

However, Kepler figured out that he could go on forever if he also used overlapping decagons, which he called 'monsters'.  Look at this picture he drew:

https://plus.maths.org/issue45/features/kaplan/kepler.gif

If he had worked even harder, he might have found the Penrose tilings, or similar things discovered by Islamic tiling artists.  Read the whole story here:

• Craig Kaplan, The trouble with five, https://plus.maths.org/content/trouble-five

How did Kepler fall in love with geometry?  He actually started as a theologian.   Let me quote the story as told in the wonderful blog The Renaissance Mathematicus:

Kepler was born into a family that had known better times, his mother was an innkeeper and his father was a mercenary. Under normal circumstances he probably would not have expected to receive much in the way of education but the local feudal ruler was quite advanced in his way and believed in providing financial support for deserving scholars. Kepler whose intelligence was obvious from an early age won scholarships to school and to the University of Tübingen where he had the luck to study under Michael Mästlin one of the very few convinced Copernican in the later part of the 16th century. Having completed his BA Kepler went on to do a master degree in theology as he was a very devote believer and wished to become a theologian. Recognising his mathematical talents and realising that his religious views were dangerously heterodox, they would cause him much trouble later in life, his teacher, Mästlin, decided it would be wiser to send him off to work as a school maths teacher in the Austrian province.

Although obeying his superiors and heading off to Graz to teach Protestant school boys the joys of Euclid, Kepler was far from happy as he saw his purpose in life in serving his God and not Urania (the Greek muse of astronomy). After having made the discovery that I will shortly describe Kepler found a compromise between his desire to serve God and his activities in astronomy. In a letter to Mästlin in 1595 he wrote:

I am in a hurry to publish, dearest teacher, but not for my benefit… I am devoting my effort so that these things can be published as quickly as possible for the glory of God, who wants to be recognised from the Book of Nature… Just as I pledged myself to God, so my intention remains. I wanted to be a theologian, and for a while I was anguished. But, now see how God is also glorified in astronomy, through my efforts.

So what was the process of thought that led to this conversion from a God glorifying theologian to a God glorifying astronomer and what was the discovery that he was so eager to publish? Kepler’s God was a geometer who had created a rational, mathematical universe who wanted his believers to discover the geometrical rules of construction of that universe and reveal them to his glory. Nothing is the universe was pure chance or without meaning everything that God had created had a purpose and a reason and the function of the scientist was to uncover those reasons. In another letter to Mästlin Kepler asked whether:

you have ever heard or read there to be anything, which devised an explanation for the arrangement of the planets? The Creator undertook nothing without reason. Therefore, there will be reason why Saturn should be nearly twice as high as Jupiter, Mars a little more than the Earth, [the Earth a little more] than Venus and Jupiter, moreover, more than three times as high as Mars.

The discovery that Kepler made and which started him on his road to the complete reform of astronomy was the answer to both the question as to the distance between the planets and also why there were exactly six of them: as stated above, everything created by God was done for a purpose.

On the 19th July 1595 Kepler was explaining to his students the regular cycle of the conjunctions of Saturn and Jupiter, planetary conjunctions played a central role in astrology. These conjunctions rotating around the ecliptic, the apparent path of the sun around the Earth, created a series of rotating equilateral triangles. Suddenly Kepler realised that the inscribed and circumscribed circles generated by his triangles were in approximately the same ratio as Saturn’s orbit to Jupiter’s. Thinking that he had found a solution to the problem of the distances between the planets he tried out various two-dimensional models without success. On the next day a flash of intuition provided him with the required three-dimensional solution, as he wrote to Mästlin:

I give you the proposition in words just as it came to me and at that very moment: “The Earth is the circle which is the measure of all. Construct a dodecahedron round it. The circle surrounding that will be Mars. Round Mars construct a tetrahedron. The circle surrounding that will be Jupiter. Round Jupiter construct a cube. The circle surrounding it will be Saturn. Now construct an icosahedron inside the Earth. The circle inscribed within that will be Venus. Inside Venus inscribe an octahedron. The circle inscribed inside that will be Mercury.”

This model, while approximately true, is now considered completely silly!   We no longer think there should be a simple geometrical explanation of why planets in our Solar System have the orbits they do.

So: a genius can have a beautiful idea in a flash of inspiration and it can still be wrong.

But Kepler didn't stop there!  He kept working on planetary orbits until he noticed that Mars didn't move in a circle around the Sun.  He noticed that it moved in an ellipse!  Starting there, he found the correct laws governing planetary motion... which later helped Newton invent classical mechanics.

So it pays to be persistent - but also not get stuck believing your first good idea.

Read The Renaissance Mathematicus here:

https://thonyc.wordpress.com/2010/11/15/kepler%E2%80%99s-divine-geometry/

Puzzle: can you tile the plane with shapes, each of which has at least the symmetry group of a regular pentagon? 

So, regular pentagons and decagons are allowed, and so are regular 5-pointed stars, and many other things... but not Kepler's monsters.  The tiling itself does not need to repeat in a periodic way.

#geometry #astronomy  
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I would like to +1 this about 10 times.
Algorithmic quilt fill patterns by Chris Carlson. Concept, design, reverse-applique snipping by Nina Paley. Stitchcoding & binding by Theodore Gray. Stitched by Behemoth. Based on horse photographs by Eadweard Muybridge, 1878. Same horse at half speed ...
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Beaker v1.2 has been released.  Download now from http://BeakerNotebook.com.  Among many improvements, Beaker v1.2 has:

 • Support for Java and Scala, including sharing classes with Groovy.
 • Support for running Python2 and Python3 at the same time.
 • A better method of finding and configuring language backends.
 • Support for Processing via p5.js.
 • New APIs for reflection, scripting, and dashboards.
 • Works with old Mac hardware and old Mac operating systems.
 • Standard output and error output now appear below the cell that produced them instead of in a unified panel.
 • Too many performance and bug fixes to count.
Beaker is a notebook-style development environment for working interactively with large and complex datasets. Its plugin-based architecture allows you to switch between languages or add new ones with ease, ensuring that you always have the right tool for any of your analysis and visualization needs.
1
Add a comment...

Scott Draves

Discussion  - 
 
Beaker v1.2 has been released.  Download now from http://BeakerNotebook.com.  Among many improvements, Beaker v1.2 has:

 • Support for Java and Scala, including sharing classes with Groovy.
 • Support for running Python2 and Python3 at the same time.
 • A better method of finding and configuring language backends.
 • Support for Processing via p5.js.
 • New APIs for reflection, scripting, and dashboards.
 • Works with old Mac hardware and old Mac operating systems.
 • Standard output and error output now appear below the cell that produced them instead of in a unified panel.
 • Too many performance and bug fixes to count.
Beaker is a notebook-style development environment for working interactively with large and complex datasets. Its plugin-based architecture allows you to switch between languages or add new ones with ease, ensuring that you always have the right tool for any of your analysis and visualization needs.
2
Add a comment...

Scott Draves

Discussion  - 
 
Beaker v1.2 has been released.  Download now from http://BeakerNotebook.com.  Among many improvements, Beaker v1.2 has:

 • Support for Java and Scala, including sharing classes with Groovy.
 • Support for running Python2 and Python3 at the same time.
 • A better method of finding and configuring language backends.
 • Support for Processing via p5.js.
 • New APIs for reflection, scripting, and dashboards.
 • Works with old Mac hardware and old Mac operating systems.
 • Standard output and error output now appear below the cell that produced them instead of in a unified panel.
 • Too many performance and bug fixes to count.
Beaker is a notebook-style development environment for working interactively with large and complex datasets. Its plugin-based architecture allows you to switch between languages or add new ones with ease, ensuring that you always have the right tool for any of your analysis and visualization needs.
1
Add a comment...
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Work
Occupation
Software Artist
Employment
  • Two Sigma Investments
    Developer, 2013 - present
  • Electric Sheep
    Software Artist, 1999 - present
  • Google
    Software Engineer, 2008 - 2013
  • DreamWorks
    Generalist
  • Transmeta
    Member of the Technical Staff
  • FastForward Networks
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New York
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Pittsburgh - San Francisco - Rhode Island - Tokyo - Copenhagen - San Jose - Buenos Aires Argentina - Bogatá Colombia - Raleigh North Carolina
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Tagline
Founder of the Electric Sheep
Introduction
Founder of the Electric Sheep, developer at Two Sigma, working on Beaker Notebook.
Education
  • Brown University
    BS in Math
  • Carnegie Mellon University
    PhD in Computer Science
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Spot
excellent new playground with bathrooms and fountains.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
this playground is a sad example of urban decay. this is a neighborhood where many of the buildings are neglected and shuttered. one of the teenage boys playing basketball was wearing shoes with soles so worn out his bare toes were showing through the bottom. the other one was wearing socks only, and his shoes were on the sidelines, perhaps because they hindered his play. the playground ground (floor) featured the site of an old fire and broken glass. the word f$&k was graffitied in several places... then some six year old girls and a five year old boy showed up babysitting their two year old brother. she asked if we could push him in the high-chair baby swing, but he was terrified when it started moving and asked to get down. He clearly had never been in a swing before. there were no parents in sight. altogether depressing.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
always good no matter what's on the menu including drinks from bar!
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
15 reviews
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do not shop here. it took me a few times to learn, i kept thinking that must have been an exception. but no, it's a nightmare all day everyday. if you do go, plan on spending an extra hour.
Quality: GoodAppeal: Poor - FairService: Poor - Fair
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
slow and disgusting
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
I always get delivery so I don't know what it's like in the restaurant, but the food is great. I eat a lot of Indian and this is the best place around Columbia/Harlem. The food is much better than some other more expensive restaurants.
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago