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The great Should-We-Be-Public" debate at +LeWeb with Andrew Keen and Milo Yiannopoulos and me.

Lots of people came up to me afterward and said this was the best panel at LeWeb. I think they are exaggerating but it was fun.
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Nick Allen's profile photoJeff Jolie's profile photoJojo Scoble's profile photoKevin Bryan's profile photo
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I love it how +Robert Scoble is playing on his iPad whilst he's on the talk program. It's great! I too listen whilst talking to people looking at my Samsung G2. :)
 
"We" should be able to be as public as we wish. So I think both Robert and Andrew are right.

We need control -- for Robert that means exposing himself. For others  not so much -- that is the way it should be.
 
Oban is an amazing whisky and I don't like champagne. We have to be related and I'd totally be saying that if we didn't have the same family name. Really interesting and great talk. I hope you had a great time in London and visit to Britain.
 
trolls like andrew should be ignored
 
Wonderful discussion!  Enjoyed it immensely!
 
+Guillaume Riflet I was on the plane when John Edwards announced he was running for president. His mistress was sitting right next to me. Just because they are visible doesn't mean they are transparent. I have a friend who is tracking what world politicians say on Twitter. It's very interesting but most still don't use social systems to communicate with the people they serve. That's what this really about: customer service. Some politicians get it, many don't. This world is flipping, though, because of the ability to talk with thousands all from one screen.
 
+Jojo Scoble I was using my iPad to watch what people were saying on Twitter using an app called StreamBoard (about the conference and the debate).
 
+Robert Scoble  It was just so funny when the presenter/host was a little taken aback that you were using your iPad like you weren't being involved with what was going on and ironically you are probably most in tune. Ironic too considering what the topic was. I think most conferences and talks and debates should have a live twitter feed, at the very least to the participants of the talk.
 
I would love to discuss the filter bubble  more in depth. What Andrew doesn't count is one of the filters is the people in my life. Most people don't like whisky, for instance, even in my social graph. My friends bring new experiences into my life all the time and make sure I'm not insular. Or not insulated too much against new experiences. That said, I do seek out a certain kind of friend, usually one who is geeky, so I don't tend to hear about the non-tech world all that much. For instance, I really don't care too much about what the Vatican is doing, although even with that my friends bring into my view stories about the Vatican once in a while, usually when the Pope is saying something ridiculous about birth control.
 
+Jojo Scoble I think perhaps its the moderator / interviewers job to have the feed there. For speakers - I think it could distract or put you off if negative comments come through. - The show of hands that we were all white willing to openly share our info MUST have had an effect on Keen. 
 
+Nick Allen OK. I agree to a certain extent with what your saying, yes, should be moderated, that's why the audience shouldn't really have much view otherwise they woult concentrate as much on the talk. Filtering pertinent messages to moderators and have a filtered feed of the feed would be ideal. Anyone want to develop that?
I still think that Robert using his iPad was honouring the whole point of the talk and riled Andrew Keen a little bit who's a bit dour on all this social stuff. I have regular discussions with my friends about what to share and what not to but then I'm not some dodgy person that needs to hide anything or on the run or need to hide. In fact, I want people to know who I am because I love to network and get the most out of my career, but then am I limiting myself to only meet those who are channelling themselves in the same way?
 
Aghh, Highlight is not on Android yet. Booo
 
Agreed +Jojo Scoble  - we could really do with a sentiment based quick fire filter for moderators. And I was in full agreement with +Robert Scoble monitoring the feed. There was a famous LeWeb presentation (female presenter, at a France event,can't remember who) where the presenter had the twitter wall behind her, and everyone started to complain, it was VERY embarrasing as she had no chance to react.   

I have the same philosophy, I share online what I would openly discuss with someone I have recently met IRL, not much to hide so why bother.  
 
I purposely live outside in.  I think we need to prepare for what is already in front of us.  We are digital by nature.  There is not a ghost in the machine as much as their is a machine in the ghost.  I just bought Keen's book and tweeted that I bought it.
I bet he doesn't mind that.
 
+Nick Allen negative comments come in all the time while I'm on stage. If you aren't confident about dealing with them you shouldn't be on stage, first of all, and second of all you definitely shouldn't look at a screen. Personally I want to know negative comments while I'm on stage and can actually do something to fix them, not later when they just will make me feel bad.
 
+Robert Scoble   I  agree. Seeing those comments come in and being agile enough to ad lib and reinforce your point if needed is the mark of a good speaker. Finding that balance of enough feedback to assist vs. noise might be hard though. I'm still a terrible public speaker so really not sure there. Watching the experts to learn. :-)
 
+Nick Allen I'm merely an adequate public speaker. But confidence comes with practice. I'm far more comfortable on stage today than when I started (I was truly horrid when I first was on stage, shaking like a leaf). It's like scuba diving in cold water. The first few minutes you are in the water you are useless, your body is just trying to acclimate to the cold. After that, you get into it. and are able to enjoy the experience.
 
+Jojo Scoble if you cared about having bleeding edge apps you'll get an iPhone. Android will always be behind for the most part with app developers because of many reasons. First is fragmentation.
 
+Robert Scoble 'Bleeding edge' - LOL. I am patient, I can wait. I love my android platform, they have names like 'Icecream sandwich' and 'Gingerbread', it's like being in a Brother's Grimm fairytale of technology. But It's also the aspect of having a lot of free aps too that I like. I like Apple, it's is a great company, I have a MacPro. Just saying.
 
+Jojo Scoble app developers tell me it's a lot easier to build a company on iOS than on Android. Then they move over, just like Flipboard did. Highlight is working on an Android version, I saw the founder at LeWeb last week.
 
I wish these social networks would get serious about filters.  Being able to pick just some parts of people's feeds would go a long way in improving the social experience.
 
+Robert Scoble that's great news. Work out the glitches then come over to Android. :) Looking forward to Highlight on Android, just like I did for Instagram. Good things come to those who are patient enough to know that they are coming. The cutting edge of the bleeding edge of technology. 
 
I'll check this out when I get home! Looks interesting!
 
I liked this panel, highlight seems like an app I would really use. Is there an app similar like that for Windows Phone/Android? Or is it just for iPhone?
 
Why? Because the folks I want to meet aren't on Banjo but they are on Highlight. Last night Instagram's business developer was on Highlight as she picked up Kevin Systrom, cofounder. I've met the head of Al Jazeera on Highlight. The head of Nike marketing. VP at NBC, etc etc etc.
 
I guess it is time for me to buy an iPhone 4S.
Don L
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That was painful.  There were these glimmers of a real discussion or debate here and there that I was hoping would take off but that moderator (Milo) was terrible.  You can't have a debate between two people if you're the one talking all the time.
 
Good conversation. It would have been "great" if Scoble conceded that he has a private world outside of his public persona.... I mean in addition to his bedroom.
 
wow, that was awkward.. I may not agree with all of the points made by +Robert Scoble, but at least he approached the debate with an open mind and was into having some kind of discussion. All I heard from the 'man in black' was negativity. What a shame.
 
+Robert Scoble The filter bubble problem is not when users decide the filter. It's when users can't see what filter is being placed over the results. It's like if Google+ decided what circles you should have instead of you deciding what people to have in your circles. You can't get an accurate perception of what's going on because you can only see a biased viewpoint and it censors out the other side of the story completely. Since it decided for you.
 
+Robert Scoble  Good for you. Your adversary is a garden variety troll.

Andrew Keen hates the web revolution, blogs, and the common man. His book "Cult of the Amateur" is his defense of domination systems, corporations, and old fashioned traditions of secrecy and manipulation.

Keen does not want non-elites to assert themselves. He is not comfortable with the average person having a voice on a level playing field with the large powerful institutions.

He wants us to go back to trusting authority figures. Jerry Sandusky must be a huge embarrassment to this way of reactionary thinking.
 
Hahaha...I'm sitting here listening to this sipping Oban! Great show so far!
 
I thought this TED talk about information diets and filter bubbles was particularly relevant to this discussion. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did :) http://youtu.be/B8ofWFx525s
 
Enjoyed it... thanks for sharing.
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