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A Delaware-sized hunk of ice could soon break away from Antarctica. http://ow.ly/T7Ai307PXLA
One of Antarctica’s largest ice shelves is nearing its breaking point, scientists warn. A colossal crack in the Larsen C ice shelf abruptly grew by 18 kilometers during the second half of December 2016, members of the Antarctic research group Project MIDAS reported January 5. The crack is now only about 20 kilometers away from reaching Larsen C’s edge and snapping off a hunk of ice the size of Delaware.Such a breakup could destabilize the ice she...
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Remarkably loose-fitting skin could help hagfish survive a shark bite. http://ow.ly/Ezy4307OLhX
View the videoNEW ORLEANS, La. – Skin that mostly hangs loose around hagfishes proves handy for living through a shark attack or wriggling through a crevice.The skin on hagfishes’ long, sausage-style bodies is attached in a line down the center of their backs and in flexible connections where glands release slime, explained Douglas Fudge of Chapman University in Orange, Calif. This floating skin easily slip-slides in various directions. A shark t...
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These marine worm larvae are, in effect, swimming noggins. http://ow.ly/z9US307Obhb
Certain marine worms spend their larval phase as little more than a tiny, transparent “swimming head.” A new study explores the genes involved in that headfirst approach to life.A mud flat in Morro Bay, Calif., is the only known place where this one species of acorn worm, Schizocardium californicum, is found. After digging up the creatures, Paul Gonzalez, an evolutionary developmental biologist at Stanford University, raised hordes of the larvae ...
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Green was all the rage a couple of billion years after the Big Bang. http://ow.ly/vWLM307QgNr #aas229
GRAPEVINE, TEXAS — Green was all the rage a couple of billion years after the Big Bang.Galaxies in the early universe blasted out a specific wavelength of green light, researchers reported January 7 at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society. It takes stars much hotter than most stars found in the modern universe to make that light. The finding offers a clue to what the earliest generation of stars might have been like (SN: 10/1/16, p. 25)...
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Efforts to make better batteries charge forward. http://ow.ly/Yf2x307PTUq
Everybody wants more power from their batteries. Smartphones and laptops always need recharging. Electric car drivers must carefully plan their routes to avoid being stranded far from a charging station. Anyone who struggles with a tangle of chargers every night would prefer a battery that can last for weeks or months.For researchers who specialize in batteries, though, the drive for a better battery is less about the luxury of an always-charged ...
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Negatively charged clusters of hydrogen could form naturally in space. http://ow.ly/JLws307PRwW
Scientists have produced a new form of hydrogen in the lab — negatively charged hydrogen clusters.Each cluster consists of hydrogen molecules arranged around a negatively charged hydrogen ion — a single hydrogen atom with an extra electron — at temperatures near absolute zero, the researchers report in the Dec. 30 Physical Review Letters. Similar, positively charged ion clusters have previously been found, but this is the first time scientists ha...
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A 52-million-year-old fossil of a tomatillo is an "impossible fossil." http://ow.ly/63PU307OL7e
Two tiny tomatillo fossils have kicked the origin of nightshade plants back to the age of dinosaurs.The fossils, pressed into 52-million-year-old rock, suggest that the nightshade family originated millions of years earlier than scientists had suspected, researchers report in the Jan. 6 Science.Nightshades include roughly 2,500 species of plants, from tomatoes to eggplants to tobacco. Previous estimates had dated the family to some 30 to 51 milli...
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Covering important and emerging research in all fields of science.
Introduction
Science News has been published since 1922. This award-winning biweekly news magazine covers important and emerging research in all fields of science. It publishes concise, accurate, timely articles that appeal to both general readers and scientists, reaching nearly 130,000 subscribers and more than one million readers. Audible.com distributes an audio edition of Science News. News from the Science News reporting team also appears at www.sciencenews.org. Updated daily, this site covers all areas of science.
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