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Call for Editors! - Join ScienceSeeker

Looking for a new challenge/opportunity this 2016 and beyond? Join the ScienceSeeker team of Editors today!
The ScienceSeeker team is continually evolving, and as such we always welcome enquiries from prospective editors.

Read on to find out more:
http://www.scienceseeker.org/2015/12/call-for-editors-become-part-of-most.html
Looking for a new challenge/opportunity in 2016? When it comes to reporting science, the mainstream media can struggle, and often even gets things wrong. ScienceSeeker is therefore an essential resource, enabling readers ...
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Virologists, start your poliovirus destruction!

● Overview from the +World Health Organization​:
Objective 2 of the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018 calls for an important transition in the vaccines used to eradicate polio and requires the removal of all oral polio vaccines (OPVs) in the long term. This will eliminate the rare risks of vaccine-associated paralytic polio (VAPP) and circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV).

● The end of an era:
Over the years, science podcaster, blogger and virus guru, Professor +Vincent Racaniello​, has worked with, published, and co-published 81 papers on poliovirus replication, vaccines, and pathogenesis.

In this featured article on scienceseeker.org, he takes us through a brief history of the virus, his extensive laboratory research on type 2 polioviruses, and how he feels about the WHO's decision on a synchronized, global switch from trivalent OPV to bivalent OPV (in April 2016), a critical step in the eradication of polio.

● Follow his story at the Virology Blog:
http://www.virology.ws/2016/01/07/virologists-start-your-poliovirus-destruction/

● Vincent Racaniello's publishings:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=racaniello+poliovirus

● WHO Replacing trivalent OPV with bivalent OPV:
http://www.who.int/immunization/diseases/poliomyelitis/endgame_objective2/oral_polio_vaccine/en/

● Image:
Cutaway representation of a complete poliovirus virion. Jason Roberts, Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, 2012. http://www.vidrl.org.au/resources/supercomputer-simulations/

● ScienceSeeker Editors' Picks:
View our collection - https://plus.google.com/collection/oK4WX
See all our picks - www.scienceseeker.org

● Tags: #scienceeveryday #microbiology #virology #polio #sciseekpicks
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ALEKS DIAS's profile photoRaphael “Speedy” Ndem's profile photoathid asasili's profile photoMona Malik's profile photo
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Is EU free of polio because they send a lot of the vaccine to Africa?
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Probiotics – medicine for the mind?

● Mind-blowing Microbiota:
Humans healthily co-exist in a commensal agreement with intestinal bacteria, the gut microbiota; a biological relationship that goes back over many evolutionary millenia. Emerging research suggests that these bacteria not only influence the local enteric (i.e. intestinal) niche but can also modulate host brain function, behaviour and even mental health via what is commonly termed the microbiota-gut-brain (MGB) axis. Chemical communication between the gut microbiota and the brain via the MGB axis is increasingly acknowledged in the scientific community. Thus, the opportunity to medically manipulate this interaction provides a novel therapeutic avenue for treating, for example, psychiatric disorders.

● As +Bio Detectives​ summarises
[...] This opens up the possibility of orally manipulating the microbiota to cause positive psychological adjustments, as has been demonstrated in promising – albeit preliminary – human studies.

● Via the Bio Detectives blog:
http://biodetectives.co.uk/guest-post/probiotics-medicine-for-the-mind/

● Source:
Voices from within - http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00018-012-1028-z

● Image: Scanning electron micrograph of the often commensal bacterium Escherichia coli. NIAID / flickr, licensed under CC BY 2.0.

● ScienceSeeker Editors' Picks:
View our collection - https://plus.google.com/collection/oK4WX
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● Tags: #scienceeveryday #microbiology #sciseekpicks
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Rachelle Mcphail's profile photoJoanna Toms's profile photoJuju. Valadez's profile photoathid asasili's profile photo
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My doctor told me when I had medical problems several years ago that most of my problems were tied to my digestive system and diet, and when I as being treated for those aliments my health improved ten fold, many thanks to the advanced medical community and researchers, thank you very much.
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Drug-resistant bacteria possess natural ability to become vulnerable to antibiotics​​​

● Superbug: A. baumannii
Infections with one of the most troublesome and least understood antibiotic-resistant superbugs, Acinetobacter baumaannii, are increasing at alarming rates, particularly in health-care settings. But new research, published July 13 in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Online Early Edition, suggests that infections with drug-resistant bacteria may be amenable to antibiotics after all, without the need to develop new antibiotics, as reported by a team at Washington University School of Medicine​ in St. Louis.

Bacteria are natural competitors and have the capacity to kill off other bacteria. In order to become bacterial assassins, the researchers found that multidrug-resistant A. baumannii, a frequent cause of difficult-to-treat infections in hospitals, has to relinquish its ability to defy antibiotics.

The researchers expected the bacteria to readily kill other bacteria by producing and injecting a poison into their bacterial competitors. Killing the competitors should help A. baumannii infections spread widely and quickly. But instead, they found that part of the bacterial population regularly deactivated the plasmids, which turned on the poison injection system and transformed the bacteria into killers. But doing so meant the bacteria also turned off the antibiotic-resistance genes, making the bacteria vulnerable to antibiotics.

Additional studies of A. baumannii samples from other outbreaks worldwide found the same trade-off: the bacteria’s ability to kill competitors could be activated but doing so left them at the mercy of antibiotics.

As explained by the researchers, this appears to be a common strategy for these bacteria in different parts of the world, and such knowledge could lead to more effective treatments and better strategies for preventing the development of superbugs.

● Via +Machines Like Us​:
machineslikeus.com/news/drug-resistant-bacteria-possess-natural-ability-become-vulnerable-antibiotics

● Source:
news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Drug-resistant-bacteria-possess-natural-ability-to-become-vulnerable-to-antibiotics.aspx

● Image:
Pandrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

● ScienceSeeker Editors' Picks:
View our collection - https://plus.google.com/collection/oK4WX
See all our picks - www.scienceseeker.org

● Tags: #scienceeveryday #sciseekpicks #superbug #antibioticresistance
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Cleto La's profile photoDL Keur's profile photoPrijo Purnomo's profile photoathid asasili's profile photo
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qimqpo
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Eyes on Environment: The Search for Artificial Photosynthesis

● As efficient as Natural Selection?
"Natural selection is not a master engineer, but a tinkerer. It doesn't produce the absolute perfection achievable by a designer starting from scratch, but merely the best it can do with what it has to work with."

- Jerry Coyne

What can we learn from Nature's expertise in refinement? What if we developed technologies that mimicked the best machinery developed from eons of evolution? Photosynthesis, the ubiquitous process that converts solar energy to usable chemical fuel that serves as the foundation for all life on Earth, is a prime example. As fossil fuels dwindle, scientists hope to replicate plant photosynthesis using human-made materials to store light as chemical energy in hydrogen, which has three times the energy density of gasoline. Finding a cheap method to do this could provide clean hydrogen fuel as the basis for a future, fossil-fuel-free economy. So far, attempts have succeeded in reproducing the basic process but have had difficulties keeping devices stable for long periods of time. Now, a recent study may have found a solution, bringing artificial photosynthesis closer to a practical reality.

The technique requires the use of a silicon semiconductor coated with Nickel-Oxide as a protective layer. Such artificial water-splitting devices, built with inorganic crystals and acids, electrical wires winding away like tentacles, may offer no resemblance to the flexible green organics of plant photosynthesis. But the chemistry at the core is the same, and we are just now beginning to match the elegance of Nature's million-year-old machinery.

● Via +Jonathan Trinastic​'s Goodnight Earth blog:
http://gnightearth.com/2015/05/01/eyes-on-environment-the-search-for-artificial-photosynthesis/

● Citation: http://www.pnas.org/content/112/12/3612

● Image credit: Weft on wikipedia.org

● ScienceSeeker Editors' Picks:
View our collection - https://plus.google.com/collection/oK4WX
Visit our blog - blog.scienceseeker.org

● Tags: #scienceeveryday #sciseekpicks #naturalselection #photosynthesis
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Juliana Nahmias's profile photoathid asasili's profile photoJovan68@outlook.com's profile photoM. Chenashky's profile photo
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,-,,,p,
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Do You Share Political Preferences With Your Parents?

The role of genes in political preferences, by James Sherlock of +Psychology Today.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/great-ape-expectations/201602/do-you-share-political-preferences-your-parents
The hidden role of genes in political party preferences
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+Owen Roberts​ we at ScienceSeeker do not assume all politics are American. An editor of ours has selected a post from one of our feeds (we aggregate science news) and I have reshared it to this page.
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Are you a ScienceSeeker?

Are you a scientist? a science academic? an enthusiast? or even just generally interested in the science that surrounds us all? ScienceSeeker encourages you to follow this collection to see some of the best of our Editors Picks at scienceseeker.org

Better yet, why not go one step further and join the ScienceSeeker team of Editors? Respond to our call for editors via the link below:

http://www.scienceseeker.org/2015/12/call-for-editors-become-part-of-most.html

Feel free to leave any feedback about our collection below.
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As a fellow scholar, (I just finished tackling a MA thesis about 7 months ago) I definitely appreciate that! Also, I understand how hectic life can get. That being said, I look forward to your next posts! :)
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New microscope techniques give deepest view yet of living cells

● Breaking nano-barriers:
Two new microscopy techniques are helping scientists see smaller structures in living cells than ever glimpsed before. Both variations on structured illumination microscopy (SIM), the new methods developed by Eric Betzig and colleagues at the Howard Hughes Medical Research Institute's Janelia research campus (ashburn, Va.), greatly improve on the spatial resolution provided by SIM, allowing them to view structures just 45 to 84 nanometers wide. This beats the previous resolution of 100 nanometers, and shatters the 250 nanometer diffraction barrier imposed by the bending of light.

● Via +Tina Saey of +Science News:
https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker/new-microscope-techniques-give-deepest-view-yet-living-cells

● Video: https://vimeo.com/136537187

● Image credit: Image from a video of cytoskeletal proteins in a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell. D. Li et al, Science 2015

● Reference:
https://www.hhmi.org/news/imaging-techniques-set-new-standard-super-resolution-live-cells

● ScienceSeeker Editors' Picks:
View our collection - https://plus.google.com/collection/oK4WX
See all our picks - www.scienceseeker.org

● Tags: #ScienceSunday   #SciSeekPicks   #Microscopy
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R
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Killer T Cell: The Cancer Assassin

● Caught on camera:
In this video, researchers at the University of Cambridge have captured cytoxic T cells - a specialised type of white blood cell whose function is to patrol our bodies and kill cells which are cancerous or infected with viruses.

Shown as orange or green in the video, these specialised cells travel around our body using protrusions to explore the surface of the cells they encounter. If they detect the cell as cancerous or infected (blue), they are able to bind to them and inject poisonous cytotoxin proteins (red) to kill the cell.

● Abstract from the source:
Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) use polarized secretion to rapidly destroy virally infected and tumor cells. To understand the temporal relationships between key events leading to secretion, we used high-resolution 4D imaging. CTLs approached targets with actin-rich projections at the leading edge, creating an initially actin-enriched contact with rearward-flowing actin. Within 1 min, cortical actin reduced across the synapse, T cell receptors (TCRs) clustered centrally to form the central supramolecular activation cluster (cSMAC), and centrosome polarization began. Granules clustered around the moving centrosome within 2.5 min and reached the synapse after 6 min. TCR-bearing intracellular vesicles were delivered to the cSMAC as the centrosome docked.

● Via +Wellcome Trust​ blog:
http://blog.wellcome.ac.uk/2015/05/22/image-of-the-week-killer-t-cells-caught-on-camera/

● Citation:
http://www.cell.com/immunity/fulltext/S1074-7613(15)00173-9

● Full video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ntk8XsxVDi0

● ScienceSeeker Editors' Picks:
View our collection - https://plus.google.com/collection/oK4WX
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● Tags: #scienceeveryday #sciseekpicks #cancer #biology
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+Sebastian Arellano from all of the videos I've watched, it appears that the answer lies mostly within the immune system and maintaining emotionally/spiritually fit.
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The Future of ScienceSeeker: Please Take Our Survey

As many of you know, ScienceSeeker was a project of ScienceOnline. When the Board of Directors announced in October that ScienceOnline would cease operations and cancel the 2015 conference, we were happy to announce that ScienceSeeker would stay in business …and we’re still happy to announce this! But as we move forward, it’s time that we explore more sustainable options.

How do you use ScienceSeeker? Which features are your favorite, and which could you do without? We are considering cutting back on a few of our services, and we’d love your input.

Please take this very brief survey to share your thoughts with us. The ScienceSeeker editors and technical team look forward to working with our users during this transition to ensure that ScienceSeeker continues to be a useful resource.

Survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SLQ2J77
Web survey powered by SurveyMonkey.com. Create your own online survey now with SurveyMonkey's expert certified FREE templates.
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ScienceSeeker Editors' Selections

● September 28 - December 28, 2014
Each week, the ScienceSeeker editors select their favorite posts within their respective fields of interest and expertise. The Editors' Selections for the past quarter of the year 2014 are now on our blog - blog.scienceseeker.org.

Don’t forget you can recommend your favorites as well – just click the little star icon next to the post’s entry!

ScienceSeeker would like to wish all our followers, scientists, and science enthusiasts alike a Happy New Year in advance.

● Tags #ScienceEveryday  
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Ebola Spread Compared To Other Diseases - Featured Editor's Pick

● Ebola Simulation
A simulation which appeared at the Washington Post shows how quickly 10 diseases, ranked from most to least fatal, could spread from one person to 100 unvaccinated people. It illustrates that although Ebola may kill more than other diseases, it spreads much slower.

Ebola, with a death rate of 70% is clearly the deadliest, with Smallpox (30%), Measles (25%) and SARS (11%) right behind.

The rates of spread are significantly different as diseases require a certain amount of time to be transmitted from one generation to another. The flu, for example, reached 100 infections after only 12 days, whereas it took 71 days for Ebola to reach the same number of infections. It is also worth noting that the simulation never looks the same way twice.

As explained by +George Dvorsky via +io9, while this simulation does not give any definitive answers as to how contagious Ebola is, how quickly it spreads or even how many people it will kill, there are are Mathematical epidemiologists who design far more complex simulations to tackle these questions, in turn, helping public officials to tackle disease outbreaks.

Run the simulator for your self via the link below, and visit the source for the full coverage.

● Simulator:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/health/how-ebola-spreads/

● Source via +Washington Post:
http://goo.gl/oAxKXu

● ScienceSeeker Editors' Picks from the past week:
blog.scienceseeker.org

Add +ScienceSeeker to your circles so you don't miss any more of our posts, including our Editors' Selections for the past week.

● Tags: #ScienceEveryday   #Epidemiology   #Ebola   #simulation  
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BBK1's profile photoAmelior Deliberator's profile photoStephanie Bauer (Lain8609)'s profile photo‫قيس القيسي‬‎'s profile photo
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+john gury "Obviously. Very simple, if you are living in the past."

I must admit, I didn't add anything after that because I'm honestly not sure what you were trying to imply.
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There are thousands of science blogs and news sites around the world, written by active scientists, journalists, professors, students, and interested laypeople. But until now, there hasn’t been a good way for readers to sort through all of them. There are dozens of blog collectives, many sites that organize some of the information in the blogs, but none that attempt to encompass the entire range of science reporting, analysis, and discussion taking place at an astonishing pace, worldwide.

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