Profile

Scrapbook photo 1
Scrapbook photo 2
Scrapbook photo 3
Scrapbook photo 4
Scrapbook photo 5
Sarah Sharp
Works at Intel
6,825 followers|3,266,515 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
Game & game engine designers: Have you ever wondered if a particular #OpenGL extension was supported in #Linux by all hardware vendors? There's a site to find out: https://mesamatrix.net/
Show Mesa progress for the OpenGL implementation into an easy to read HTML page.
19
5
Anthony Kavassis's profile photoJian-Jhong Ding (JJ)'s profile photoAbdulla Kamar's profile photoTobias Thierer's profile photo
2 comments
 
That is much prettier than the gl3 file.
Add a comment...

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
This post has a set of very good recommendations for dealing with a Code of Conduct violation:

1. When someone is getting harassed by another person in the project, don’t treat this like you would a technical conflict.

2. Have a Code of Conduct before you need one along with a plan for how to handle incidents.

3. When you write your Code of Conduct, ensure that underrepresented people have a voice. If your project is extremely homogeneous, ask for help – involve outsiders who are familiar with the difficulties of writing a Code of Conduct. Be willing to pay people for their expertise on this topic.

4. Don’t tell people to stay quiet about abuse. This removes them from their support network of friends and family.

5. Be transparent when you amend legal documents. Being sneaky as part of trying to intimidate people with lawyers is not ok.

6. Be proactive in keeping folks who report harassment up to date on the status of your deliberations. Provide regular (daily or better) updates, especially if the harassment is ongoing. What’s an administrative matter for you is causing them constant pain. It should be a push process, not a pull one.

7. When someone has to leave an IRC channel and stop going to conferences because they are scared of a person, this is a sign that there is a problem that needs to be addressed. It’s rare for people to speak up about negative behavior. If one person is uncomfortable, chances are that there’s more community members who are having issues with them but not speaking up.

Understand that the measure of health in any open source community is how they deal with conflict.

If you’re a dude, don’t reach out to women leaving other open source projects saying “join us here!” You have no idea if women in the community have problems or not. Women will talk to other women about the quality of the community. But it’s also just really bad taste. Instead, find someone in your community that is also part of that minority group to reach out. They’ll know more about potential issues than you will.

Publicly stand behind the women in your community, or eventually they will leave and write a post just like this.
79
14
Simos Xenitellis's profile photoVincent JOBARD (Winael)'s profile photo

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
Thanks to +Konstantin Ryabitsev and +Kamal Mostafa I'll be playing SpaceChem dressed as a My Little Pony. Watch me play on twitch: http://www.twitch.tv/sarahsharp

Want me to play your favorite Linux game, or dig further into my cosplay closet? Donate to #ExtraLife2015:
http://www.extra-life.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=donordrive.team&teamID=26831
49
2
Konstantin Ryabitsev's profile photoKamal Mostafa's profile photoJens Van Broeckhoven's profile photoRashad Rashad's profile photo
3 comments
 
Yay! Waldos!
Add a comment...

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
Reposting my response to this comment: http://sarah.thesharps.us/2015/10/05/closing-a-door/#comment-148420

Willy, I think you’ve hit upon the exact spot where I and most of the senior Linux kernel developers disagree. I believe you can be technically brutal without being personally brutal and still get your message through. In fact, most times, your explanation of the issues will be clearer, because you’ll focus on expressing what they did wrong, rather than your own emotions.

As for your comments about the emotional mapping of Europeans to what they say, we will have to respectfully disagree. If you saying “I wish someone would kill you” is equivalent to feeling disappointment over someone’s skills as a maintainer, that mapping is just broken.

http://marc.info/?l=linux-arm-kernel&m=137877061404509&w=2

What do you say when you’re past disappointment into anger at a larger broken system? Well, in Linus’ case, it seems that he slips into homophobic slurs. That means he thinks that being gay is worse than being dead. What kind of message does that send LGBTQ developers who want to get involved with your kernel community? (I almost said “our community” there but it’s no longer my community.)

The most frustrating thing for me is that as a woman, I don’t get to participate in the same skewed emotional spectrum without harming myself professionally. I have had other kernel developers imply that I’m being “too emotional” and that I should “calm down” when I raise my voice even in the slightest. Women are socially trained to care about the community around them and other people’s feelings, and they get called nasty sexist slurs when they don’t have empathy.

From reading articles and talking to other minorities, they also feel the awful double standard here. Black men and women get labeled as violent or deviant when they speak in anger. Or get shot by police if they attempt to assert their rights. If they express anger at a system that oppresses them, they get told to pay attention to white men’s feelings. They can’t win.

When you say Europeans have a habit of exaggerating their emotions, to the point of tearing down other people, what minorities hear is “I have the privilege to not be able to care about other people’s emotions."

I would highly recommend checking out Scalzi’s post on privilege, “Straight White Male: The Lowest Difficulty Setting There Is”. It explains privilege with as gaming metaphor that I think most people can connect to.

http://whatever.scalzi.com/2012/05/15/straight-white-male-the-lowest-difficulty-setting-there-is/

[prev in list] [next in list] [prev in thread] [next in thread] List: linux-arm-kernel Subject: Re: [GIT PULL 0/3] ARM: SoC: Second round of changes for v3.12 From: Linus Torvalds Date: 2013-09-09 23:49:23 Message-ID: ...
64
8
Jeffrey Yasskin's profile photoEric Christopher's profile photoJohannes Schindelin's profile photoThiago Macieira's profile photo
32 comments
 
+Steven Rostedt No, there is no research showing the effect on the code when people are sensitive -- that doesn't mean it does not need to be done.  There is plenty of research that says that less diverse teams create lower-quality solutions, though, and that the behaviors that I identify make people who are "different" (/diverse) feel unwelcome.

The two pieces add together to paint a solid picture, I think.
Add a comment...

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
What makes a welcoming open source community?
*Pokes head in, sees comments are generally positive*. There's been a lot of discussion in my comment sections (and on LWN) about what makes a good community, along with suggestions of welcoming open source communities to check out. Your hearts are in the right place, but I've never found an ...
67
20
Joe Philip Ninan's profile photoWill Hill's profile photoAmy Rich's profile photoDaniel Baluta's profile photo
14 comments
 
Microsoft and Intel are lawless so we don't really know the depths of their depravity, but again +Tomeu Vizoso, you are avoiding my questions and missing their point.  Every few years, through some court action or leak, we learn something new about Microsoft and Intel's lawless behavior. This is a perpetual scandal the US government sought to exploit rather than end.  My questions are about Sarah Sharps' relationship with Intel and the free software community.  I see some inconsistencies that can easily be explained and some that are more difficult.  I'd be happy for you to answer my questions, but +Sarah Sharp is the only person who can answer definitively.   
Add a comment...

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
I'm really honored to win Red Hat's Women in Open Source award. :)
 
My interview with winner of the Red Hat Women in Open Source Community Award, +Sarah Sharp 
Congrats, Sarah!
Red Hat announces the winner of its first Women in Open Source Community Award, Sarah Sharp. Sharp is a software developer who has been involved in Linux kernel development since 2006. Read more about her in this interview with Rikki Endsley, Community Manager at Opensource.com.
View original post
179
7
Jennifer Bhartiya's profile photoDrew Fustini (pdp7)'s profile photoThiago Macieira's profile photoEbru Akagündüz's profile photo
18 comments
 
which project do you join in?
Add a comment...
In her circles
156 people
Have her in circles
6,825 people
Chris Oconnor's profile photo
Gare Calhoun's profile photo
Keshav Kumar Baranwal's profile photo
‫ابرهيم ابرهيم الخولي‬‎'s profile photo
Hrannar Jónsson's profile photo
Jay Aurabind's profile photo
brian michelyp's profile photo
Panayotis Tsiamis's profile photo
Tom Wang's profile photo

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
My keynote from #scale14x  is up! I talked about how to increase diversity in open source communities in a systematic manner, using Maslow's hierarchy of needs. https://www.youtube.com/embed/rUDgDSKdSPo?t=24m52s

Notes, resources, links to studies mentioned, and slides can be found on my blog: http://sarah.thesharps.us/2016/01/24/scale-improving-diversity-with-maslows-hierarchy/
31
8
Richard Mace's profile photoSimos Xenitellis's profile photoMarina Zhurakhinskaya's profile photoManuel Alzurutt's profile photo
 
Glad you're still at it! 
Add a comment...

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
Ever run into an Intel #Linux graphics driver bug and wanted to test whether it was fixed in mesa master? The good news is that you can install drm and mesa binaries in a custom directory, without overwriting your system installation. The bad news is that it's a bit complicated, so I wrote a tutorial:
When I worked as a Linux kernel developer, I often ran across people who were very concerned about compiling and installing a custom kernel. They really didn't like running the bleeding edge kernel in order to check that a specific bug still existed. Who can blame them?
35
2
Adrian M Negreanu's profile photoAnthony Kavassis's profile photoIgor Gnatenko's profile photo
 
Was something wrong with my comment, that it had to be deleted ?
Add a comment...

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
Dear Linux and Open Source enthusiasts,

This Saturday and Sunday, we will be playing computer games all day. Not just for fun, but for a greater purpose! We're raising funds for Doernbechers Children's Hospital. Doernbechers treats thousands of children each year, regardless of their family's ability to pay. These kids are facing scary stuff like cancer, cystic fibrosis, and injuries from accidents. Your donation is tax-deductible and ALL PROCEEDS go to help kids.

Team Powerpuff Penguins will be playing Linux computer games on Saturday and Sunday. To spice things up a bit, we have some donation perks and stretch goals:

Donate $1: Personal thank-you on twitter or twitch.

Donate $10: A member of team Powerpuff Penguins will play a free game of your choice.

Donate $15: Sarah Sharp will put on a piece of cosplay from her treasure bin.

Donate $20: A member of team Powerpuff Penguins will play a $10 or less game of your choice.

Donate $30: Jamey Sharp will answer a question of your choice on stack overflow OR Sarah Sharp will answer one question about USB or the Linux kernel. We will not take more than ten minutes to answer, so nothing too complex!

Donate $40: A member of team Powerpuff Penguins will play a $20 or less game of your choice.

Donate $50: Sarah and Jamey will do a happy dance on camera! Or something equally cute. Possibly involving cats.

Note: All games must be able to run on Linux on a Haswell laptop with Intel integrated graphics. I promise to play at least five minutes of your game. I reserve the right to refuse to play a game for any reason. I don't like horror, FPS, dating sims, or twitch games. I do like exploration, puzzles, turn-based RPGs, and story-rich games. Jamey and I will be paying for games out of our own pockets, but games can also be gifted to my steam account.

Please donate, watch us have fun, and help out Doernbechers Children's Hospital!

Thanks,
Team Powerpuff Penguins
Team fundraising page for Powerpuff Penguins
45
4
David Anders (prpplague)'s profile photoRubin Starset's profile photoChristoph Korn's profile photoJon Cruz's profile photo
9 comments
 
Thanks +Kamal Mostafa! I'll be playing it shortly, dressed as a My Little Pony (Spitfire), thanks to a donation by +Konstantin Ryabitsev 
Add a comment...

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
An example of why "Be excellent" isn't a sufficient CoC. Without explicit listing of negative behaviors to avoid, the interpretation of what construes harassment is left up to the majority members of the community. Those members are almost always the ones with the most privilege and power, who are likely to be biased against believing complaints from people with different lived experiences.
 
Last night, Noisebridge broke tradition and enacted an Anti-Harassment policy.  Here's why that matters.

For the last five years, Noisebridge, one of the oldest hackerspaces in the country, has been run as a consensus-based anarchist collective that had just one rule: "Be excellent to one another."  It's consensus-driven political process means that any major changes to the space that go beyond its typical "doocracy" have to be put up for consensus, a system in which a single member's refusal to agree can shut down an otherwise popular request.  The consensus process is one that is not conducive to much in the way of governance, though this is of course generally viewed as more of a feature than a bug; it ensures that the space remain true to its anarchist roots.

Recently, this has become more and more problematic, as attempts to remove sexual predators from the space have been stymied by the presence of lone, oblivious members of the community who simply refuse to believe that someone they consider a friend might not be a friend to women in the space.  The situation at Noisebridge has gotten so bad (alongside other issues such as dirtiness and homeless people living in the space) that long-time members went so far as to put in a proposal that Noisebridge seek to terminate its lease[1], presumably to then rebirth itself at a new location with tighter access control.  Although it was clear that this proposal would never pass consensus, the decision was made that we would discuss the reasons why it was proposed, in the hopes of fixing the underlying issues in the future.  By sheer luck, the meeting had been scheduled shortly after a feminist hacking event sponsored by Double-Union, a local feminist hackerspace, and as a result a large contingent of woman hackers was present.  Stories pretty quickly came out about why so many were willing to let the space die.

I've been spending time at Noisebridge for the last year, and in that time, I've been harassed by multiple people on many different occasions, almost always with members present.  Never once has a member intervened or spoken up on my behalf: not when Weev called me a cunt or made anti-semitic, anti-mormon, anti-woman, anti-gay jokes loudly in the space, not when someone loudly (and descriptively) told me about the "sluts" they double-penetrated the night before, not when an individual (upon seeing me about to leave the space on my Powerisers) declared "I love your stilts.  I'm going to make you my bride and then those will be mine" before slapping my ass as I was leaving just a few weeks ago.  The closest thing I have felt to supported in the space was when one individual decided to doocratically paint over the bathroom wall, which at the time was covered in images of maimed and broken crying women with enormous tits and waists so thin they would make Barbie jealous.  It has become abundantly clear to most women in the space that "Be Excellent" has failed us.  

Any other night, the telling of these stories would simply have been an explanation of why we were willing to let go of Noisebridge, why we were ready to withdraw from the community, but that night we had just come from a room full of interesting, engaging, awesome feminist hackers, and I had sitting in my email a very clear anti-harassment policy that had been created by the good folks at the +Ada Initiative and the ladies of Double Union.  Once the dust had settled, we made a proposal: to adopt an anti-harassment policy, post it visibly in the space, and empower members to remove the toxic elements from the community, without having to go through the consensus process to do so.  The policy we proposed is as follows:

Noisebridge is dedicated to providing a harassment-free experience for everyone, regardless of gender, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, or religion. We do not tolerate harassment of people at our events or space in any form. Sexual language and imagery should be only be used for positive purposes in accordance with best practices advocated by professional sex educators (if you’re not sure what those are, don’t do it). People violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled from the space or the event at the discretion of any Noisebridge member.

Harassment includes offensive verbal comments related to gender, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, religion, sexual images in public spaces, deliberate intimidation, stalking, following, harassing photography or recording, sustained disruption of talks or other events, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention. People asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately."

The key strength of the policy is that it allows a member to kick someone out, without requiring consensus to do so.  This prevents the situation we've sadly been dealing with in which individuals have blocked attempts to remove predators from the space, but brought some concerns about evidence and the possibility of innocent people being excluded.  The policy did pass (provisionally), but not without objection.  The arguments against it were the standard ones: free speech, false accusations, and straight-up denial of there being a problem at all.  A few people expressed concerns about the possibility of the policy being used in retaliatory ways (the old "false-rape accusations" argument), including Monad, the lone member who threatened to block.  He, of course is responsible for perhaps the best quote of the night: "The first sentence is fine.....the rest of it is just stupid to me."

Monad was demonstrating exactly the problem Noisebridge has had for years.  He was fine with the idea of there being a policy, with saying "Noisebridge is dedicated to providing a harassment-free experience," but he balked at the idea of defining what harassment was or creating any system by which it could be dealt with.  In short, he wanted to simply be able to say "be excellent" and have it happen, but wasn't willing to accept that for some things, specifics are needed.

Some arguments, especially those that erupted on twitter after Leif Ryge, a Noisebridge member, tweeted his displeasure about the policy [2], centered on the idea that it was tantamount to censorship, banning "sexual imagery and language."  Of course, Leif's tweet was misleading, as the policy doesn't ban sexual language & imagery entirely, just mandates that "Sexual language and imagery should be only be used for positive purposes."   It's a far cry from the "censorship" that some people are claiming this represents.

In the end, we weren't able to convince Monad from backing down on his threat to block, a position he justified by claiming that the policy might be used alongside false accusations as a way of removing people you don't like from the space, so we settled on a compromise: to pass the measure with an expiration date, so that we could have a few months to tweak the language, perfect it and smooth out any issues, and see whether or not any of these "false accusations" that are so often the favorite arguments of rape apologists actually occurred.  To those of you that believe that the policy is needed, but needs some tweaking, I hope that you will use the time between now and January to iron out the details and come back with an even better policy: one that makes it clear that harassment is not acceptable behavior in the space, that still has teeth, and that can draw clear lines and boundaries that ensure that unwanted sexual attention is unacceptable while perhaps approaching the issue from a slightly more sex-positive standpoint.  The policy has been posted on github [3].  Let's make it better.

[1]https://noisebridge.net/wiki/Meeting_Notes_2013_09_17#Proposals_from_last_week
[2]https://twitter.com/wiretapped/status/382872227156205570
[3]https://github.com/noisebridge/anti-harassment
[edit] Short announcements and events. Note-taker lost this first part of the notes. :(; Maybe clearing out of the space. Possible discussion item. Sci-fi up the space. There's gonna be a group about that. Week minus 4 of getting an FM radio band.
53 comments on original post
47
3
Isaac Carroll's profile photoDavid Anders (prpplague)'s profile photoBrian Marete's profile photoWoodrow Hill's profile photo
9 comments
 
+Rubin Starset that is a fascinating tale. Thank you for sharing it. I would love to hear from more people who were present at the time, or who were involved before or after.

"It's more of a constant problem like catching the common cold, than something that can be cured forever." That is a great way of looking at the issue. This sort of thing is an illness that hacker communities are susceptible to. Ongoing hygiene (addressing problems immediately, community support for those who call someone on bad behavior, etc) is the way to prevent it.

The thing that surprised me most is "the members who wrote them don't come to the space anymore". Perhaps the period of increased vileness caused them to give up on the community? It sounds like they ultimately achieved what they were aiming for, even if they're no longer around to enjoy it.
Add a comment...

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
Closing a door on the Linux kernel community: http://t.co/rck2pzymRm
This post has been sitting in my drafts folder for a year now. It has never been the right time to post this. I have always been worried about the backlash. I've skirted around talking about this issue publicly for some time, but not acknowledging the elephant in the room has eaten away at me a ...
211
89
Sedat Kapanoglu's profile photoClaudio Omar Biale's profile photoMeredith Goldsmith's profile photoJavi Merino's profile photo
51 comments
 
+Sarah Sharp I agree with the necessity of better human relations and behaviour. Hope the change will happen so that you come back to kernel contributors. I'll keep me informed.
Add a comment...

Sarah Sharp

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
This just got announced: Christoph Hellwig has filed a lawsuit against VMware for violating the GPL on the Linux kernel
The Software Freedom Conservancy provides a non-profit home and services to Free, Libre and Open Source Software (FLOSS) projects.
9 comments on original post
26
2
Pradeep Doddaballapur's profile photoDon Kyhotay's profile photoAndrew Latham's profile photoStephen Cameron's profile photo
3 comments
 
Now this is real software piracy.
Add a comment...
People
In her circles
156 people
Have her in circles
6,825 people
Chris Oconnor's profile photo
Gare Calhoun's profile photo
Keshav Kumar Baranwal's profile photo
‫ابرهيم ابرهيم الخولي‬‎'s profile photo
Hrannar Jónsson's profile photo
Jay Aurabind's profile photo
brian michelyp's profile photo
Panayotis Tsiamis's profile photo
Tom Wang's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Linux Software Engineer
Employment
  • Intel
    Linux Software Engineer, present
Story
Tagline
Gardening, Bicycling, Photography. Linux, FLOSS, Arduino, Android.
Introduction
I'm very passionate about open source and open hardware.  I've been running Debian/Ubuntu on my laptops since 2004.  I'm a Linux kernel hacker, and I'm the author/maintainer of the Linux USB 3.0 host controller driver. I'm getting into Mesa development and ChromeOS.

I occasionally dabble in Android app development and Arduino hardware projects. My other passion is gardening.  Sometimes the two passions combine, and I create cool Arduino projects to automate my garden.

I'm a bicyclist, and have been car-free since 2006.  I travel the world, and occasionally post pictures of said travels.

I'm married.  I will block people who are obviously chasing tail. I also reserve the right to block people who make sexist, racist, homophobic, ableist, or misogynist statements, or any other form of repressive speech.
Bragging rights
Linux USB 3.0 maintainer (2009 - 2014)
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Relationship
Married
Other names
Sarah Bailey