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Sandesh Patkar
Attends University of Mumbai
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Sandesh Patkar

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It's almost Friday. I'm so tempted to plus one my own post. Lol :-)
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Sandesh Patkar

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Save trees!
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Sandesh Patkar

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Several telescopes shall be set up at various locations in Mumbai for free public viewing of astronomical objects.

Date:
6th April 2014 (Sunday)

Timing:
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Locations: 
Worli Seaface
Nariman Point 
Thane
Dadar

In addition, telescopes shall be set up at Nehru Planetarium on every Friday, Saturday and Sunday of April 2014 for free public viewing.

We shall update this space with specific details during the week.
Sidewalk Astronomy Mumbai
Sun, April 6, 7:00 PM GMT+5:30
Mumbai

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Sandesh Patkar

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Meenakshi Amman Temple, India ... Wikipedia -- "Meenakshi Amman Temple (also called: Meenakshi Sundareswarar Temple, Tiru-aalavaai [1][2] and Meenakshi Amman Kovil) is a historic Hindu temple located on the southern bank of the Vaigai River[3] in the temple city[4] of Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India. It is dedicated to Parvati, known as Meenakshi, and her consort, Shiva, here named Sundareswarar. The temple forms the heart and lifeline of the 2500 year old city[5] of Madurai and is a significant symbol for the Tamil people, mentioned since antiquity in Tamil literature though the present structure was built between 1623 and 1655 CE.[6][7][8] It houses 14 gopurams (gateway towers), ranging from 45-50m in height. The tallest is the southern tower, 51.9 metres (170 ft) high, and two golden sculptured vimanas, the shrines over the garbhagrihas (sanctums) of the main deities. The temple attracts 15,000 visitors a day, around 25,000 on Fridays, and receives an annual revenue of sixty million. There are an estimated 33,000 sculptures in the temple.[9] It was on the list of top 30 nominees for the "New Seven Wonders of the World". The annual 10-day Meenakshi Tirukalyanam festival, celebrated during April and May, attracts 1 million visitors. ..."

more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meenakshi_Amman_Temple
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Sandesh Patkar
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Strange Signal From Galactic Center Is Looking More and More Like Dark Matter

The more that scientists stare at it, the more a strange signal from the center of the Milky Way galaxy appears to be the result of dark matter annihilation. If confirmed, it would be the first direct evidence for dark matter ever seen.

Dark matter is a mysterious, invisible substance making up roughly 85 percent of all matter in the universe. It floats throughout our galaxy, but is more concentrated at its center. There, a dark matter particle can meet another dark matter particle flying through space. If they crash into one another, they will annihilate each other (dark matter is its own antiparticle) and give off gamma rays.

To search for a dark matter signal, astronomers use NASA’s Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope to map the gamma radiation throughout the galaxy. Then, they try to account for all known sources of light within this map. They plot the location of gas and dust that could be emitting radiation and subtract that signal from their gamma-ray map. Then they determine where all the stars are and subtract out that light, and so on for every object that might be emitting radiation. Once all those sources are gone, there remains a tiny excess of gamma radiation in the data that no known process can account for.

“The more we scrutinize it, the more it looks like dark matter,” said astrophysicist Dan Hooper of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, co-author of a paper that appeared Feb. 26 on arXiv, a website that hosts scientific papers that have yet to go through peer-review.


Since 2009, Hooper has been claiming that this bright signal is evidence of dark matter. According to his team’s latest data, the gamma radiation could be produced by dark matter particles with a mass of 30 to 40 gigaelectronvolts (GeV) crashing into one another. A proton is roughly 1 GeV for comparison.

But the galactic center is a tricky place. There are many other gamma ray sources that could be mimicking a dark matter signal as well as yet undiscovered phenomena that might account for the radiation. For the most part, few other researchers have been convinced of Hooper’s data. One oft-used counterargument is that the excess gamma ray signal could come from millisecond pulsars — dead star cores that spin extremely fast and beam out a huge amount of energy. Astronomers don’t yet have a good understanding of how these objects work.

“If you need to explain something weird in the galactic center, you wave your hands and say, ‘Millisecond pulsars,’” said astronomer Doug Finkbeiner of Harvard, another co-author of the new work.

Finkbeiner has long been a skeptic that the excess Fermi telescope signal represents dark matter annihilation. He knows that the galactic center is a strange place full of unexpected phenomena, having discovered in 2010 two gigantic structures spanning 50,000 light-years emanating from the Milky Way, which had gone unnoticed until then. But a more careful look at Hooper’s data has started to convince Finkbeiner that there might be something there.

When a galaxy forms, gravitational attraction brings together a huge mass that begins spinning. As they spin, large galaxies cool down and flatten out like a pizza, forming the familiar spiral shape seen in many telescope images. Dark matter, which actually makes up the bulk of a galaxy’s mass, can’t flatten out because it doesn’t interact with the electromagnetic force, which would allow it to radiate away thermal energy. It stays in a spherical halo circling the galaxy. So any dark matter signal should come not just from within the galactic plane, but also from above and below it, where stars are few and far between but dark matter is abundant.

More here: http://bit.ly/drkmatt
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Sandesh Patkar

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My son would never rape a woman. It is brutal, disgusting and immoral. He simply isn't capable of such a thing. She has obviously enticed him. ______________________________________________________...
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Sandesh Patkar

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Save trees!
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Sandesh Patkar

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love this
share with your friends!

~Vicky :)
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Sandesh Patkar

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Strange Signal From Galactic Center Is Looking More and More Like Dark Matter

The more that scientists stare at it, the more a strange signal from the center of the Milky Way galaxy appears to be the result of dark matter annihilation. If confirmed, it would be the first direct evidence for dark matter ever seen.

Dark matter is a mysterious, invisible substance making up roughly 85 percent of all matter in the universe. It floats throughout our galaxy, but is more concentrated at its center. There, a dark matter particle can meet another dark matter particle flying through space. If they crash into one another, they will annihilate each other (dark matter is its own antiparticle) and give off gamma rays.

To search for a dark matter signal, astronomers use NASA’s Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope to map the gamma radiation throughout the galaxy. Then, they try to account for all known sources of light within this map. They plot the location of gas and dust that could be emitting radiation and subtract that signal from their gamma-ray map. Then they determine where all the stars are and subtract out that light, and so on for every object that might be emitting radiation. Once all those sources are gone, there remains a tiny excess of gamma radiation in the data that no known process can account for.

“The more we scrutinize it, the more it looks like dark matter,” said astrophysicist Dan Hooper of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, co-author of a paper that appeared Feb. 26 on arXiv, a website that hosts scientific papers that have yet to go through peer-review.


Since 2009, Hooper has been claiming that this bright signal is evidence of dark matter. According to his team’s latest data, the gamma radiation could be produced by dark matter particles with a mass of 30 to 40 gigaelectronvolts (GeV) crashing into one another. A proton is roughly 1 GeV for comparison.

But the galactic center is a tricky place. There are many other gamma ray sources that could be mimicking a dark matter signal as well as yet undiscovered phenomena that might account for the radiation. For the most part, few other researchers have been convinced of Hooper’s data. One oft-used counterargument is that the excess gamma ray signal could come from millisecond pulsars — dead star cores that spin extremely fast and beam out a huge amount of energy. Astronomers don’t yet have a good understanding of how these objects work.

“If you need to explain something weird in the galactic center, you wave your hands and say, ‘Millisecond pulsars,’” said astronomer Doug Finkbeiner of Harvard, another co-author of the new work.

Finkbeiner has long been a skeptic that the excess Fermi telescope signal represents dark matter annihilation. He knows that the galactic center is a strange place full of unexpected phenomena, having discovered in 2010 two gigantic structures spanning 50,000 light-years emanating from the Milky Way, which had gone unnoticed until then. But a more careful look at Hooper’s data has started to convince Finkbeiner that there might be something there.

When a galaxy forms, gravitational attraction brings together a huge mass that begins spinning. As they spin, large galaxies cool down and flatten out like a pizza, forming the familiar spiral shape seen in many telescope images. Dark matter, which actually makes up the bulk of a galaxy’s mass, can’t flatten out because it doesn’t interact with the electromagnetic force, which would allow it to radiate away thermal energy. It stays in a spherical halo circling the galaxy. So any dark matter signal should come not just from within the galactic plane, but also from above and below it, where stars are few and far between but dark matter is abundant.

More here: http://bit.ly/drkmatt
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Sandesh Patkar

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Dark matter found with X-ray?

Two teams working on the search for dark matter have independently suggested the search could concentrate at a specific X-ray wavelength, following study of data collected by the XMM-Newton space observatory.

While it's not a proof of anything just yet, the two groups – one from the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics, the other from the Netherlands' Leiden Observatory – have spotted a spectrographic line in X-rays at 3.5 kiloelectron volts, and this line is observed across 73 galaxy clusters.

Readers familiar with particle physics discoveries such as the search for the Higgs boson will be aware that identifying possible energies is a big thing to particle hunters. It's an interface between the theoretician and the experimentalist: “If particle W exists, its decay should emit Particles X and Y, carrying energy Z”.

What's intriguing the scientists is this: that particular energy doesn't match anything we already know about what generates galactic X-rays. Science quotes one of the scientists, Maxim Markevitch of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, as putting it this way: “We could not match it with anything that would come from a thermal plasma”.

You can read more here: http://bit.ly/Nqdt2f
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Have him in circles
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Education
  • University of Mumbai
    present
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I am always curious. Magnets and trains fascinate me!
Introduction
Heyy!!! 
Hello everyone.




My Parents-Mom and Dad. They are awesome.
I love them. A-lot.
They rock.


I am Indian. I am proud to be Indian. I love India.
I am extremely patriotic. Extremist to be precise.
Theres much to change in our country. We can change it. I dont think the politicians can. They suck. Educationless.Unpad-gawar. Criminals. I will go on for days if asked to.
The only respectable Indian politicians are our PM Manmohan Singh & Ex-president Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam.
Hats off to them.
The rest I dont think are Indians.

I adore people like APJ Abdul Kalam(Ex-president of India),Manmohan Singh(Prime Minister of India),Ratan Tata(TATA Chairman),Dhirubhai Ambani(Reliance Group),Anil Ambani(ADAG Group owner), Laksmi Niwas Mittal(Steel tycoon),Warren Buffet(Owner of Hathway Berkshire),Bill Gates(Microsoft Founder),Steve Jobs(Apple Inc. Founder), Stephen Hawking(Astrophysicist),Albert Einstein(Physicist),Adolf Hitler(Dictator),Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi(Freedom Fighter),Shahrukh Khan(Actor).
My friends and family.
These people are great.
They have changed the world with things they have done.
The others will change the world in future. 

I hate studies.But I love PHYSICS.
Its awesome.

I want to be richVery rich.Dont know why....but I want to be world's richest.

Shares. I love trading shares. You earn some. You lose some. Thats the simple logic. The best part is, anyone can trade shares-You,me,anyone. Thats the beauty of it.

I love cars. Small cars. Hot wheels.I have 100 of them.Its not a problem if you want to gift me something...hot wheels (note this ) are always welcome.

I dont like teachers who who dont really know how to teach. Teachers like those suck.(I dont know why I have written this :s)

I respect people who deserve respect.
Not the ones who demand it.

I keep secrets.
I love keeping secrets.

I am curious....very curious.

I am not scholar. I get average marks.I hate chemistry. It sucks. I am afraid of Chemistry. Please teach me. Maths is good....not a problem.

And I love Physics.
Astrophysics, its awesome.Wonderful.I love it.

I got some really awesome friends and people around me.
My Parents-Mom and Dad. They are awesome.

On Google+ , I am owner of these pages

And btw, I am currently doing engineering. :)

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