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Sandbox Therapy Group
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Occupational Therapy - Speech/Language Therapy, and Psychological Services.
Occupational Therapy - Speech/Language Therapy, and Psychological Services.

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Speech Therapy Goals For Children by Sandbox Therapy Group

Here are some suggested developmental goals for a child to grow that every parent should know. Make sure to read this share-worthy blog post at Sandbox Therapy Group titled "Speech Therapy Goals For Children: What Parents Can Do At Home To Help" https://goo.gl/feKQpr

#speechtherapy #speechlanguagepathologist #speechtherapygoals #child #therapy #sandboxtherapy
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The Importance of Being Seen. By: Lauren Harrison, MA, LMHCA, R-DMT

Let’s imagine that you’re on a hike with your 6 year old daughter. You observe her walking fast and with an intensity to each step. You continue witnessing her experience while holding her in esteem. Eventually, you enter her world by speeding up the rhythm of your voice to match the pace of her walk. You start making playful sounds with a rhythm and vocal strength that reflect your child’s stride. Your child notices you noticing her by making direct eye contact with you and laughing. You take delight in this moment of nonverbal connection and so does your child. Through acknowledging her nonverbal expression, you’ve validated her and recognized her as important.

Every child needs to be seen in order to fully blossom. Being seen by a trusted adult helps a child develop a healthy sense of self. When a caregiver truly sees their child, this builds empathy, creates connection and supports the child in developing self-awareness. Above, we’ve described a creative and full-bodied approach to “seeing” which can be utilized by parents and caregivers to deepen their connection with their children. This method of seeing starts with non-judgmental observation and empathetic reflection of nonverbal expression. This way of “seeing” requires present moment awareness, curiosity and acceptance.

The Autism Treatment Center of America states “ A child with autism is not ignoring you, they are simply waiting for you to enter their world.” Here at Sandbox we offer parent/child psychotherapy sessions where we can help parents hone their skills in “seeing” their children thus helping them to join their child’s world. We would love to support you on this journey. Come on
down to the Sandbox!

Contact Us
Sandbox Therapy Group
16150 NE 85th Street
Suite 220
Redmond, WA 98052
P: (425) 558-0558
www.sandboxtherapy.com


#autism +Sandbox Therapy Group #therapy #mentalhealth
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Speech and Language Disorders by Sandbox Therapy Group

Why enroll in speech and language therapy?

When you consider all the different options for therapeutic services, choosing the right one(s) for your child can seem overwhelming. Families today are busier than ever. Finding a well trained therapist from the right discipline, whom your child enjoys working with can be a daunting task. So today, we at the Sandbox Therapy Group will share a brief view of one of our specialties: speech-language pathology.

Sandbox Therapy Group includes speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who evaluate, diagnose, and treat speech, language, social, and cognitive disorders and differences in children and young adults. What sets our SLPs apart is the team approach we take to each child we serve, coordinating care with other Sandbox Therapy Group professionals in the fields of psychology and occupational therapy.

To begin our look at speech-language pathology and how it works, let’s take a look at some early milestones that typically developing children achieve. These have been provided by ASHA: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, a national credentialing association, with membership approaching 200,000 health care providers.

Quick Facts:
● By 12 months old, children should be able to enjoy simple games such as peek-a-boo, respond to familiar requests such as “Come here”, use gestures to communicate wants and needs such as arms out to be picked up, and babble in short and long strings with a variety of speech sounds. (source)
● By 24 months old, children should be able point to a few body parts and pictures in books when named, follow simple commands like “Get your shoes”, use at least 50 words and combine words into 2-word phrases. (source)
● By 3 years old, children should be able point to follow directions with two requests (“Put the book down and come here”), play turn taking games with adults for longer periods of time, have a word for all familiar objects, ask questions, and be understood by all familiar listeners. (source)
● By 5 years old, children should be able to understand most of what is said at school and home including terms of sequence (first, last) and time (yesterday, tomorrow), produce all speech sounds of their native language, talk mostly without repeating themselves, and hold a conversation with others. (source)

Speech and language disorders may affect acquisition of these milestones, while other children may achieve expected milestones but have trouble in playing appropriately or making friends. SLPs can help these children too. Speech and language disorders have no age boundaries and affect the daily lives of millions of children and adults. Let's now break the disorders down by groups, for a better understanding. The following is from the KidsHealth website.

Language disorders can affect communication in a number of different ways, including:
● Receptive disorders: difficulties understanding or processing the language of others.
● Expressive disorders: difficulty putting words together, limited vocabulary, or inability to use language in a socially appropriate way.
● Cognitive-communication disorders: difficulty with communication skills that involve memory, attention, perception, organization, regulation, and problem-solving.
● Language based learning disabilities: difficulties with reading, spelling and writing.

Speech disorders include:
● Articulation disorders: difficulties producing specific sounds in words to the point that listeners can't understand what's being said.
● Motor-Speech Disorders: trouble sequencing and correctly executing the fine-motor movements of the oral mechanism in connected speech.
● Fluency disorders: problems such as stuttering, in which the flow of speech is interrupted by abnormal stoppages, sound-word repetitions ("b-b-boy"), or prolonging sounds and syllables (sssssnake).
● Resonance or voice disorders: problems with the pitch, volume, or quality of the voice that distract listeners from what’s being said. These types of disorders may also cause pain or discomfort for a child when speaking.

Now that we have a better understanding of the types of speech and language disorders that exist, and can differentiate between "speech disorders" and "language disorders", we are ready to better understand the actual therapy itself.

One site that offers a friendly and easy to understand overview of exactly what speech therapy is, can be found at the ASHA website. It provides answers to questions such as ‘What’s normal?’, ‘What if I have concerns?’, ‘Where can I get help?’. To review this information, just go to the ASHA website.

Sandbox Therapy Group and our health care professionals would like to extend an invitation to learn more by contacting our Redmond, WA office.

Contact Us
Sandbox Therapy Group
16150 NE 85th Street
Suite 220
Redmond, WA 98052
P: (425) 558-0558

Office Hours
Monday: 9:00 AM – 6:30 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM – 6:30 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM – 6:30 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM – 6:30 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM – 6:30 PM
Saturday: 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Sunday: Closed
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Occupational Therapy Can Help Children Become More Independent At Completing Daily Tasks

Occupational therapy includes exercises and strategies that can help children in various ways. The main goal is to help them become more independent rather than rely on support or assistance from parents or carers. For starters, children will be better able to focus on the task at hand. Over time they will start to achieve better coordination as well as organizational skills. Children tend to be very unfocused and inattentive, but thanks to occupational therapy their learning and attention issues will be addressed effectively. In this way, they will be able to become more independent and able to complete daily tasks more easily and effectively.

Children who need occupational therapy need a good Occupational Therapist. Connect here: https://goo.gl/tizVRa


#occupationaltherapy #OccupationalTherapyBellevue #occupationaltherapistsRedmond #OccupationalTherapyRenton
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Want To Know More About - Occupational Therapy?

The following article answers questions surrounding Occupational Therapy and will help to explain what an occupational therapist does.

#OT #autism #mentalhealth #disability #ADHD #ASD #occupationaltherapy @sandboxtherapygroup
Sandbox Therapy Group - Better Mental Health
Sandbox Therapy Group - Better Mental Health
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There's a new Pokemon movie coming in November! Who's going?

Grab your popcorn and soda, and get ready for a trip to the theater! https://goo.gl/pt4f1E

#Pokemon #Pokemonmovie #PokémontheMovie
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Help Your Child Succeed in School

Sandbox Therapy Group helps children acquire the skills to perform daily activities and teach coordination & balance. Occupational Therapy can be a game-changer for children with sensory processing issues.

Wait....

=> In case you missed our latest Google post about Helping Your Child Cope with Changes in Routine https://goo.gl/EWiZGn


Children who need occupational therapy need a good Occupational Therapist. Connect here: https://goo.gl/JX2yy4


#occupationaltherapy #OccupationalTherapyBellevue #occupationaltherapistsRedmond #OccupationalTherapyRenton
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Helping Your Child Cope with Changes in Routine

As the summer season approaches, change is certainly at the forefront of our minds - changes in weather, activities, and routines. While many parents and children look forward to this exciting time of year, for other families this can be a time of turmoil. You may fear the sudden lack of structure to your child’s day and question how they will navigate all of their free time calmly and successfully. If you have a child with a disability or disorder, the impending summer break can prove to be even more stressful for both you and your child. We have now reached the point in the school year in which we’re nearly on autopilot - all of our routines are down, from getting ready in the morning to getting off the bus in the afternoon. We’re comfortable with our teachers, therapists, and classmates; we know what to expect on a daily basis; we know which room to eat lunch in and which day we go to therapy at Sandbox. Naturally, this happens just in time to change it all up for summer break. Sound familiar? As parents and educators of children with a range of diagnoses and needs, we know one thing for certain - routines are good. We love them. We depend on them. We thrive in them. With a little planning; however, coping with change in routine does not have to be a stressful time. In fact, this can be a perfect time to work on being flexible and more tolerant of change, skills that can be so difficult for some of our children. Here are some helpful tips and strategies that may help your child (and you!) be more prepared for summer break and have an easier transition:

Start talking to your child about the upcoming changes now - Talk about all of the fun things you have planned, but also how his days might look different - how he may not ride the bus every day or see his favorite teacher. Also, have this discussion regularly until summer begins. Having the extra time to process will help your child know what to expect and grow accustomed to the idea of change.
Use visual supports - Many children may have difficulty understanding change when simply talking about it. The more ways you can show them these changes the more they will understand and expect them. Visual supports may include pictures of activities or places, daily picture schedules and timers, videos, and social stories. If your child has difficulty understanding and/or coping with a full schedule of daily activities, shorten it to “first/then”, such as “first we are going to the grocery store, then we will go home and play outside.”
Validate your child’s feelings - Many children are aware of the upcoming changes in their day when summer break begins and may feel nervous or upset about them. When children are experiencing an emotional or behavioral reaction, it is important to be a source of calm and soothing for them. For example, you can tell your child, “I know you are upset that you didn’t get to ride the bus today, I can see that you don’t like that.” Then try to redirect your child back to their schedule or to a favorite activity or toy.
Be prepared with calming activities - Plan to have a calming activity with you both at home and on outings. This might be anything from an easy sorting activity, a favorite book, a comforting blanket or stuffed animal, or a favorite song your child likes to listen to. Should a child experience an emotional or behavioral reaction when a change occurs in his routine or plan, having a calming activity on hand is a great tool to help soothe and redirect your child, then help him transition back into his day.

Although changes in routine can be a stress-inducing time for children and parents alike, using these tools and tips will help ease a child through these changes and adjust to new plans and routines. By starting the conversation now and giving your child extra time to process, using visual supports, validating your child’s feelings, and providing them with calming activities when emotions are heightened, we can help our children become more flexible and adapt to change in their routines more successfully. https://goo.gl/PZBxMP


#PsychologicalServices #PsychologicalServicesRedmond #PsychologicalServicesKirkland #Occupationaltherapy #Speechandlanguagetherapy #speechtherapy #Autismspectrum #relationaltherapist #Psychotherapy #speechlanguagepathologist #psychoanalyticpsychotherapy #EquineTherapy #ChildDevelopment #Parenting #Psychology
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Welcome to our Google Plus page.

We would like to share a recent post that will help to provide those new to Sandbox Therapy Group a better understanding of what we offer.

SANDBOX THERAPY GROUP
16150 NE 85th St #220, Redmond, WA 98052
(425) 558-0558
schedule@sandboxtherapy.com

Areas Served:
Redmond – Bellevue – Kirkland

#therapy #therapists #psychologist #psychology #OccupationalTherapy
#SpeechLanguagePathology #STG #ADHD #autism #SLP #speech #speechtherapy
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