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Samantha Cristoforetti
Works at European Space Agency
Attended Technical University of Munich
Lives in Cologne, Germany
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L+145-L+147: Logbook

Well, the big news of the past few days is of course that Dragon has arrived! It’s always very special to watch a vehicle approach Station.

As big as ISS is, this human outpost in space is only a tiny speck of metal in the vastness of Low Earth Orbit: and yet on Friday morning, as Terry and I monitored from the Cupola, a cargo ship from Earth found us and came knocking at our door. 

I enjoyed watching Dragon getting bigger and bigger, as continents and oceans passed by beneath, but I also consciously tried to detach myself from the romantics of it all to remain focused on my main task ahead: operating the robotic arm to capture Dragon.

It’s something I have practiced hundreds of times on the simulator, mostly with the virtual vehicle moving around a lot more than a real Dragon usually does, but doing it for real is of course quite different:  let’s say that it’s one of those situations when it doesn’t take much to become very famous for all the wrong reasons!

Fortunately everything went well and, after capture, the ground team took control of the arm to slowly berth Dragon to Node 2 nadir – it’s now basically an extra room just outside our crew quarters. On Friday I performed the vestibule leak check. As you might remember, the vestibule is that space between the berthed vehicle and the ISS, a little corridor that is formed when the two are joined. Before we open the hatch of ISS we need to make sure that the vestibule is not leaking, hence we pressurize a little, to ca. 260 mmHg, and then verify the pressure again after a certain interval of time. Vestibule passed the leak check, then Scott and I opened the ISS hatch and worked a couple of hours on getting the vestibule ready, mainly removing components that are not needed while Dragon is berthed and are in the way of… opening the Dragon hatch!

Scott and Terry opened the Dragon hatch yesterday morning and that was the beginning of a weekend of intense work, getting out urgent cargo and starting the science activities, many of which are on a very tight schedule due to degradation of samples as time passes.

As soon as the big bags were out of the Dragon center volume, my task was to retrieve a new Kubik, the stand-alone centrifuge-incubators I mentioned in the last logbook, (https://plus.google.com/+SamanthaCristoforetti/posts/fyeELbtxCjt) and get it setup and configured to support two cell biology experiments, Cytospace and NATO, both of which started yesterday afternoon and will continue autonomously for a few days, when it will be time to remove the experiment containers from Kubik and put them in the freezer, waiting for return to Earth for analysis.

Cytospace, as the name suggests, looks at the cellular cytoskeleton, the structures within the cell that give it its shape. How does microgravity affect the shape of the cell? And, most importantly, how do changes in the cell shape affect gene expression? This sounds like a complicated concept, but in the end it simply means that the shape of the cell, which is changed by microgravity, likely affects the way the cell does its job. And we’re really interested in understanding this better because… well, we’re made of cells and what happens in the cells determines what happens in our body as a whole. And vice versa, what we observe in entire systems of our body, for example in term of bone loss or impairment of the immune system, can be explained by changes at the level of the cell.

Next time I’ll talk to you about NATO!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook +futura42 

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio
aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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That was the coolest photo I ever saw right out of Star Trek
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L+134, L+135: Logbook

The arrival of the Dragon resupply vehicle is now less than a couple of weeks away and it’s amazing to watch the Station getting ready for it.

I wish I could say that I have the overall picture, but that’s up to people way smarter than me who sit in the control centers and run the show. Up here, we just try to do our best in performing our daily tasks, but these are of course all pieces of a puzzle that will eventually become a full visiting vehicle mission, from capture to release, with a significant complement of science to perform while Dragon is berthed to ISS.

Yesterday I installed new software on several laptops, so they will be ready to support new science. Today I spent two hours gathering from all over the Station into one single bag all the equipment required for a specific experiment, so that everything will be readily available when those operations start a few weeks from now. And of course Terry and I continue to prepare for the capture of Dragon.

Today was our “offset grapple” practice, a two-hour session in which we could practiced flying the real arm, instead  of the simulator. I’ve talked about “offset grapples” in my L+20, +21 Logbook: check it out, in case you missed it! 

https://plus.google.com/u/0/+SamanthaCristoforetti/posts/UeZYA3DFrw1

When the last Dragon arrived, Butch performed the actual capture. This time I will be the prime robotic operator, so I will be at the controls of the arm, while Terry will be responsible for communication with the ground, running the procedures and the malfunction cue cards (the latter will hopefully not be needed).

And speaking of malfunctions, on our last “almost-grapple” today we practiced the response to a “safing event” occurring the arm end effector is already over the pin, so very close to pressing the trigger to capture, or even shortly thereafter. The arm will automatically go into a safe mode following a malfunction, making it impossible to command the joints, the end effector or the arm in its entirety.

Luckily, it’s really ‘two arms in one’: granted, there is only one set of beams and joints, but there’s otherwise full redundancy on all the components that allow the arm to function. In order to make use of that redundancy and complete the capture on the backup string, we would have to move from the Cupola to the Lab, where we have a second robotic workstation. On capture day, that second workstation is in a “hot backup” mode, meaning that literally one button press is sufficient to make it prime and put it in control of the arm. Wouldn’t you love to have that kind of redundancy on your car when that red light appears?

Ah, yesterday I also spent some time on my periodic fitness assessment. We do that on our bike, CEVIS, once a month, using a dedicated protocol, while our electrocardiogram is recorded and blood pressure is measured every five minutes. Based on this data, specialists on the ground can make an estimation of our VO2max, which is a commonly used measure of cardiovascular fitness. The typical trend observed in 6-month missions is a significant, quick decrease of VO2max early on and then a slow recovery through the daily workouts on bike and treadmill. And the closer we are to returning to Earth, the more critical it is to exercise, to be ready to face gravity again.

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa  ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio 
aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
 
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Last night was a great special on Sci Channel about replacing the camera or camera in the Hubble Telescope..Amazing that almost 1 billion dollars could have been lost when they could not remove the old bolt of 16 years.  I can't believe it has been in space for over 25 years....
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L+131-L+132: Logbook

Yesterday was a relatively easy day, which is always kind of nice at the end of the week. Not that I didn’t have a full schedule -  we always have activities from our morning Daily Planning Conference, or DPC, (somewhere around 7:30 in the morning) to our evening DPC (somewhere around 19:30). However, tasks can be more or less complex and more or less “routine”.

Running a new experiment that has not been performed before, which requires a complicated setup, a lot of coordination with the ground or delicate operations is of course a lot more demanding than performing tasks that I have done before and that I can perform autonomously – let’s say sampling the water or removing/installing lockers in our Express racks (modular racks that can support a variety of science operations and are continuously reconfigured depending on current and upcoming ops).

Simple or routine tasks that do not require a lot of support from the control centers are usually inserted in our schedule as “pink activities” – the writing is pink on our planning viewer, indicating that you can do them whenever you want, as long as they are done by the end of the day.

For non-pink activities, on the contrary,  there is an expectation that they be performed more or less on time. Some tasks are even “blue-boxed” – a thick borderline around the activity on the viewer indicates that the time is to be strictly observed. Typical blue-boxed activities are live interviews with media or public calls with VIPs, which require a complex setup on the ground to provide audio and video connection with the party on the other side for the agreed time.

Most experiments are not blue-boxed, but they are also not pink. That’s because very often specialists very familiar with the experiment operations, and sometimes the principal investigator himself/herself, are available on space-to-ground for any assistance or real-time troubleshooting that might be required. In many cases, you don’t get a second chance to get an experiments right (at least not until you fly up new samples or equipment), so it’s important to have the maximum support available in case problems are encountered.

Talking about science, today I worked a little bit with the JAXA experiment ANISO tubule. I’ve performed several runs of this experiment, each one consisting (from my side) of a sequence of activities spread over multiple days.

Let’s say that today is day 1: you retrieve a new sample chamber, like the one in the pictures, and with a syringe you slowly inject 1,5 ml of water. Then you put the chamber in MELFI for 96 hours at +2C! This simulates winter and promotes good germination of the Arabidopsis seeds. Then the chamber is moved to ambient temperature for about 4 more days (spring has arrived!) and finally, after adding more water, two days of observation in the fluorescence microscope begin, with scientists on the ground directly studying live images from ISS.

We have known for a long time that plants grow differently in weightlessness. Since they don’t “feel” gravity up here, they tend to grow a thinner and longer stem. In fact, the ANISO scientists have even done the opposite on the ground, putting seeds in a centrifuge and showing that in “hypergravity” they grow shorter and thicker stems. The difference is likely due to different orientation of microtubules in the individual cells that change their shape. I find it fascinating that something as small as a cell would be affected by gravity, but it is!

A particular group of proteins, called MAPs, control the orientation of the microtubules and hence the shape of the stem. Now, you can’t really see microtubules and MAPs directly in the fluorescence microscope, but these Arabidopsis plants have been engineered in such a way that they also produce a fluorescent protein that accurately mimic MAPs: and that does the trick! Now you can use the fluorescence microscope to indirectly observe proteins that you otherwise would not see. Fascinating, isn’t it?

Sounds a bit paradoxical, but microgravity is really a great place to study gravity response of plants, which in turn can help optimizing agricultural practices. I don’t have a background in life sciences, so this is all very new to me, but I hope you find it as intriguing as I do!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio 
aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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Приятного полёта тебе и всем твоим коллегам Саманта!
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L+129: Logbook

As  you’ve probably noticed, I haven’t been writing much this past month – my evenings have been just flying away, divided between the irresistible pull of the Cupola, other outreach projects and many little personal things that need to be taken care of.

During the day the Space Station keeps us really busy with science, maintenance, housekeeping, logistics and maintaining our proficiency in emergency responses, robotics, Soyuz flying…you name it. The variety of things we do up here is mind blowing, if I stop to think about it.

Oh, and by the way, we also had a Soyuz undock earlier this month, taking home half of our Space Station population. Well, at least in terms of human presence – I’m sure the microorganisms living up here, who outnumber us by orders of magnitude, would claim that it’s “their” Space Station and don’t care much if three biped mammals are replaced by three different ones. We, on the other, do care.

It was hard to see Sasha, Butch and Elena leave after being so close for four months and we did become just a little bit apprehensive when communication with their Soyuz was lost during the engine burn, which was somewhat unexpected. So we were happy to hear from Moscow that the search & rescue teams had made contact with the capsule and even happier to see our friends’ smiling faces as they got their first breaths of fresh air in Kazakhstan.

In case you’re wondering, we saw them on NASA TV,  like many of you, I reckon. Not sure I mentioned before, but we can get a TV station transmitted live on one of our laptops when we have satellite coverage for the Ku-Band antennas.

For a couple of weeks the Space Station felt even bigger than usual, with Terry, Anton and I as the only (human) inhabitants. Not only were there fewer people around, but of course we were only getting half of the work done, so there was less com on space-to-ground. Overall, if felt a lot quieter. And now we’re back to six!

Scott, Gennady and Misha have joined us last week and have added their personalities to the mix to create the new dynamic of Expedition 43. It’s such an invaluable opportunity to be part of two different crews: in the end, it’s the human interactions that determine our experience up here, so in a way it’s like having two space missions instead of one. And if you have such awesome crewmates as I have had on Expedition 42 and have now on Expedition 43… well, life is good! Also, Terry and I have it really easy in terms of handover: Scott has already been up here for six months just 4 years ago, so he really doesn’t need the amount of guidance and coaching (and patience!) that we required at the beginning from Butch. Scott is basically already autonomous and has already given some inputs that have improved our life and work. Always good to add a new perspective to the equation!

So, here we are, it’s April 1st already and, barring changes, my Soyuz will undock on May 14th. With me onboard, unless I hide really well. I have only 42 days left on ISS, which is of course a cool number, but it’s also not much. If I sound a little sad saying this, it’s because I am.

Anyway, with so  little time left I am committed to resume regular logbooks: there is so much still that I have to share with you! I thought I’d start by sharing some picture of life and work from the past four months: check out the captions for some insight.  Talk to you soon!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa   ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio 
aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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Auron !
 
Cosa????????
"studia" a lei??? hahahaha Ma ha idea che quello che ha studiato lei in 15 anni lui non riuscirebbe a studiarlo in 2 vite per quanto possa sforzare le piccole e povere meningi che si ritrova? Ma gli è chiaro che un neurone di Samantha pesa quanto il suo cervello intero?  No, mi sa che non gli è chiaro...
L'invidia gioca brutti scherzi, ma qui oltre all'invidia, noto che c'è evidente frustrazione per la vita, insoddisfazione, gelosia, voglia di colpire chi è meglio di te, forse perché non riescono accettare che sono esserini infinitamente inferiori rispetto a questa Donna.
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L+80 to L+82: Logbook

After working on a tight schedule through the weekend to get Dragon ready for departure and then to release it on Tuesday, on Wednesday we were given a day off. Hurrah!

I’m a night owl, so I like to sleep in when I can. On Tuesday night, before going to bed, I took a last look at Wednesday’s schedule for a confirmation that there was no need to set my alarm. Confirmed! So on Wednesday morning I slid my arms out of my sleeping bag around 9:30 and, as usual, opened my laptop to check the schedule and the Daily Summary, a message from ground controllers containing information about the state of the Station and any questions/answers/messages for the crew. Imagine my surprise when I saw an activity on the schedule at 7:30 in the morning. How could I possibly have missed that the night before? And weren’t we supposed to have a day off? And how bad was it that I hadn’t done it yet? But our Commander Butch is always up at 5 in the morning, so he would have woken me up if needed, right? So, don’t panic, let’s see what this is about…

Now, take a look at the picture with a snapshot of that activity. I’ll let you be the judge: our ground teams have some sense of humor, don’t they? We did miss the reading session on that day, and I’m sorry to report that I did not find a Hitchhiker’s Guide to Galaxy in the indicated location, but we’ll make this happen somehow!

Thursday and Friday we were back to a normal work schedule. I got to be the operator for Butch on a number of eye exams, part of the Ocular Health research for which he is a subject: I supported his ultrasound, optical coherence tomography and fundoscope exams, taking images of his eyes in more ways than I would have ever imagined possible before ISS training. I’ll also do the same exams this coming  week, but I do them less frequently than Butch and Terry, because mine are a purely medical requirement, while my crewmates also serve as subject of this research effort focused on ocular health.
Then we had to get ready for ATV undocking.

Sasha and I had an On-Board-Training session on Thursday in which we reviewed all the pre-departure procedures and our monitoring tasks. Then on Friday we closed the hatches on ATV and ISS side and… you guessed it, I’m sure you know how these things work by now…  we did a leak check.

We depressurized the vestibule between the hatches and then we monitored the pressure change for 30 minutes: had the pressure increased, either the ATV hatch or the ISS hatch would have been leaking air into the vestibule. Actually, Mission Control Moscow took care of the depressurization: vestibules on the Russian sides have a valve that can be commanded from the ground to vent the air to space. And our hatches passed the leak check with flying colors: up to 1 mm Hg of pressure increase is allowed and we only had a change of 0,5 mmHg.

That was it, the very last ATV was ready for undocking the next day!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

  #SamLogbook #Futura42  #SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS qui:
http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa  ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio  aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
 
 
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L+74 to L+75: Logbook
 
We have sent Dragon back home yesterday! I’ll tell you more about this in the coming days, but for now, I’ll just say this: looking back at the past weeks since Dragon arrival, it’s very gratifying to think of all the work we’ve done, from the experiments to the loading and unloading operations, up to the last-minute transfer of cold samples from the coolers and freezers to cold bags for return. It’s also nice to catch our breath today, though: since we had to work hard all weekend, we’re getting this Wednesday off. A nice and welcome surprise!

But now let’s go back to last week once more to catch up with the release of something a lot smaller from a somewhat smaller robotic arm: a tiny Cubesat, with the dimensions 10cm x 10cm x 10cm, was deployed by the Japanese arm on Friday. Pretty cool to see!

There were a lot of preparation activities the days before the release, in close cooperation with the JEM Control Center in Tsukuba, Japan. As you might remember if you’ve been reading this logbook, the JEM module has its own small airlock: we can open the door to the inside and slide a table into the cabin. The week prior to the release Butch had installed on this table the satellite deployment system with the Cubesat inside. On Thursday last week I got to depressurize the airlock. By the way, just like the big airlock for spacewalks, the Japanese airlock has provisions to recover most of the air into the Space Station volume: just the last bit of air, when the residual pressure in the airlock becomes too small (around 2 PSI), must necessarily be vented into space. Once the airlock was at vacuum, I opened the outer hatch into space and slid out the table with the satellite and deployment system. At that point, robotic controllers from Tsukuba grabbed the deployment system with the Japanese robotic arm and, once they had a firm grip, I got a GO to release it from the slide table, so that the arm could get full control of it and move it to the deployment position. My next task was to take pictures of the deployment and I have to say that this one made me a bit nervous: you only get one chance to get it right and that satellite goes away fast once it’s released! Really didn’t want to mess this up, can only imagine what a disappointment it would be for the students who developed the Cubesat not to have pictures.

Talking about students, on Wednesday I also got a chance to talk on the HAM radio to a group of school pupils from the schools “Locatelli-Oriani” and “Bachelet” in the Milan area: thanks for your great questions and you hard work preparing for this!

On Friday I got to spend quite a lot of time in our big airlock working on the EMU suits (the suits for spacewalks). In particular, I worked on the cooling water loops of both suits that will be used in the upcoming planned EVAs by Terry and Butch, “scrubbing” the water with different kinds of filters and adding iodine for microbial control. After that I took water samples that were returned on Dragon for analysis on the ground. The loop scrub can also be used as an opportunity to do some checks on the suits and get telemetry on the ground, so both suits were connected to a laptop on which we ran a data gathering application.

Hey, on Friday I also got to talk to Mission Control Moscow, which doesn’t happen very often to us non-Russian crewmembers. As we get ready for ATV undocking this Saturday, I ran with Moscow a checkout procedure for the ATV remote control panel that we will have deployed in the Russian Service Module when ATV departs. We’ll only need to send commands to ATV in case of an off-nominal situation, so I’m confident that we will not really need the control panel, but we’ll be ready!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS   qui:
http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa  ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio    aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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Cyndi
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Have them in circles
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L+141-144: Logbook

Well, as you might have heard, Dragon’s arrival has been delayed a few days. Had the launch occurred on Monday, it would already be berthed to Node 2 right now and we would already have opened the hatch and started to get urgent cargo out.

But hey, in the space business flexibility is paramount! The launch slipped by one day, delaying arrival to ISS by two days… that’s orbital mechanics and phasing angles for you.

But if you think that we had two free days while waiting for Dragon to come knock at our door, I’m afraid you’re not acquainted with the folks who run the ISS ops: they always have a slip plan! A launch is delayed? Voila’, old plan is taken out, new plan is put in. Ready? Go! Yes, whenever things heavily depend on an inherently uncertain event like the launch of a rocket, mission managers, flight directors and planners always fully prepare two plans: that requires a lot of extra work on the ground, but it ensures that no precious crew time on ISS is wasted.

In this case they had pretty major plans in store for the case of launch slip. I kind of got that feeling on Tuesday already: when they give you one full hour to study a procedure you’ll do the next day and then they give you another hour to gather hardware you will need for that procedure and then they tell you not to bother taking tools out of the toolbox, just take the entire drawer instead… when all that happens you start to think that you’re going to get your hands dirty on some major work. Which I love!

While Terry and Scott were busy on their own major activity with the EVA suits, I spent the day in Node 3 reconfiguring the intermodule ventilation ducting in preparation of moving the PMM module later this year from Node 1 nadir to Node 3 forward. Basically, we need a way to get ventilation to PMM in its future new location. Never thought if would be possible to fit so many bags full of hardware in Node 3, in the pretty cramped space between ARED and the toilet cabin, but somehow it worked. And at 2 am Houston-time specialists on the ground were ready to support, with a ground model of the equipment to replicate any issues had we run into problems. Fortunately, with the exception of a couple of stuck fasteners , everything went smoothly: kudos to the team for having such a great, user-friendly procedure ready!

Dragon slip also carved some time to work on the European Modular Cultivation System in Columbus. I got to de-install a number of modules called Rotor Based Life Support Systems –self-contained boxes that are attached on the rotors of this facility. They will hitch a ride to Earth on Dragon and they will be refurbished and launched again in the future to support future plant experiments.

Ah, I also worked a little on a Kubik, the stand-alone centrifuge/incubators that we sometimes operate in Columbus for experiments on cell cultures. I wrapped up the experiment Stem Cells Differentiation by moving the experiment containers to cold stowage and downlinking Kubik data to the ground. As the name suggests, this experiment studies human mesenchymal stem cells, which can differentiate into several cell types to build bone, fat, cartilage, musles, tendons. Now, if you’re a stem cell and you have all this choice, how do you know into what you need to differentiate? What are going to be when you “grow up”? That depends on what kind of signals you get from so-called signaling molecules. Vitamin-D is one of those signaling molecules and in particular we know that it is involved in telling stem cells to turn into bone cells. Bone loss is a big issue in microgravity, as you know, so this experiment observes the effectiveness of the Vitamin D signaling by comparing stem cells differentiation in presence or absence of Vitamin D. Pretty cool, ah?

By the way, not sure how much sunlight you get where you live (we don’t get much up here), but if you haven’t done so already and get a chance, at your next blood draw it can’t hurt to check you Vitamin D levels!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

  #SamLogbook +futura42 

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio 
aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
 
 
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La vit.D è importante anche per l'umore. il metabolismo ed il tono energetico generale. Quando ritorni sulla terra prova a prendere il sole integrale (bastano 30 minuti); quando lo faccio io mi carico come una molla!
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L+133: Logbook

Quiet Easter Sunday here on ISS, no work at all on my schedule, although I did a little bit of work off the “task list”. Oh, I don’t think I ever told you about the task list, time to change that!

The task list is a pool of activities that have been prepared by the ground, but don’t have a high enough priority to be put on the regular schedule. If we want to do some work in our free time, or if time frees up because some activity could be completed quicker than expected, or because a planned activity was aborted, we can browse the task list and find useful things to do.

Some are bigger tasks of several hours, others are little housekeeping tasks, like replacing the batteries or the shell of a laptop, or reconfiguring stowage in preparation of an upcoming activity. Packing and unpacking a cargo vehicle is also often on the task list, in case we want to work ahead during our free time. 

And since being late with packing is really not an option, we always get a head start: the stowage specialists on the ground send up pre-pack gather lists well before a vehicle actually shows up, so we can start getting return bags ready. In the picture you can see the Node 2 endcone with all the bags we already started to pack for Dragon. Compare it with the way it looks about a month ago for our Exp 42 crew picture!

Recording video messages or educational videos for outreach purposes is also typically on the task list, as well as a couple of procedures that are permanent entries: changing the solid waste container and the urine container in our space toilet. After the first couple of times, you don’t really need a procedure for that, but an activity also has a stowage note attached, which in this case tells you which new containers to get, where to find them and where to stow the removed ones.

As you know, every item is tracked on the Space Station: by part number, barcode , serial number.. or all three of them!

Things still get lost occasionally, unfortunately. We’re all humans and as such are prone to making mistakes:  if something ends up in the wrong place (in the real world or in the inventory system), who knows when it’s going to be found! Also, things accumulate over time that should actually have been disposed of a long time ago. Not unlike most people’s homes, we can’t afford to accumulate things that are no longer necessary, because we need the space for new hardware to support the science program.

The European laboratory Columbus, after having been on orbit for about 7 years now, has seen a little bit of that. When I arrived back in November there were quite a few stowage bags on the rack fronts: so much science going on, so little space to stow the equipment! Luckily ATV5 and SpX-5 took away some bags that were no longer used and some optimization of the available volume in the endcone has cleaned up the cabin quite a bit.

In order to optimize more, on the weekends I have been doing photo-audits of our main stowage rack in Columbus, the Deck 4 rack. The stowage team at COL-CC, the COSMOs, want to have the full picture of what’s in those lockers, in order to devise a consolidation plan that will hopefully save some space! So I have been snapping away… patiently, locker by locker, bag by bag, item by item, nicely showing all the barcodes and serial numbers.

And you thought that being an astronaut was all glamour and adrenaline, didn’t you?

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio 
aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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L+130: Logbook

Hey, I’m sure you’ve heard: we have two new crewmembers here on ISS who will remain onboard for, no kidding,  an entire year!

Might be the first of several extended expeditions and the main driver of course  is the observation of human physiology and health during a longer period of the time than the standard 6-month missions, so it’s not surprising that Scott and Misha are already being put “under the microscope” more extensively than, say, Terry or I.

There’ s a wide range of investigations that will target numerous aspects of their adaptation process and all of those experiments need start-of-mission data.

Today was a big day of ocular health research!
In fact, my working day ended with back-to-back sessions in which I supported Scott and Misha in taking funduscope images of their eyes, but even before our morning Daily Planning Conference I was already tasked with the setup of our Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) machine for their eye scans.

Gennady assisted Misha, before it was my turn to assist Scott. I must confess that I dread these events a little bit: getting good scans is not always easy and it’s not uncommon to have to repeat them multiple times to get a satisfactory result. It can be somewhat frustrating for the operator and tiring for the subject, who has to keep his/her eyes open and still for a long time.

We have awesome remote guiders who run the show from the ground, but they get the image streamed from our laptop with an ever so slight delay that sometimes makes it difficult to give real-time guidance when the image changes fast. All that said, I really had nothing to worry about today. Scott is a natural at this! He is just the perfect subject (at least certainly much better than me): his gaze was so steady that only minimal adjustments of the lens position were needed during the scans to keep the proper eye layers in view, making my job so easy. Thanks, Scott!

Between eye research sessions and a few other small tasks (like troubleshooting one of our Merlin fridge), today I also had three videoconferences with people on the ground - a bit unusual, typically they are spread out in the week. Besides the weekly videoconference with my flight surgeon Brigitte, I got to talk to ESA folks at COL-CC and ESTEC: the mission director and lead flight director, as well as the Eurocom on duty and the mission science officer. Similarly, in the evening  Scott, Terry and I had our weekly conference with Houston and Huntsville  for the NASA perspective and update on current operations from the lead flight director and the rest of the Expedition 43 team.

If you are someone who follows the live-feed from the Space Station, including the space-to-ground communications, you might have noticed that you don’t hear such conferences: that’s because mission controls puts restrictions in place, so that nobody beyond the parties involved listens to the conversation. As you can imagine that’s particularly important for the periodic medical and psychological conferences, but also for the weekly family conferences, as well as remote guidance for exams on human subjects, like an ultrasound or today’s OCT scans.

I also got to work a little on water balance today. As I’m sure we know, we recycle all the water onboard thanks to a facility called Water Processing Assembly (WPA). Well, WPA has been having some hiccups lately, so it’s not currently producing potable water. But… don’t panic! We have plenty of water in the lines and plenty of full water bags. However, while the specialists on the ground develop a forward plan to troubleshoot WPA, there’s a bit of work to be done to maintain proper water balance.

Check the picture captions for more info!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

  #SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por  +Carlos Lallana Borobio
aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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Hola, Samantha...! Informe muy interesante. Hoy vi por TV la NASA. En los canales Encuentro y TEC  (tecnología). Aquí en Argentina, América del Sur.  
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L+100, L+101: Logbook

The Logbook is back!

Sorry for the very long Loss of Signal, it’s been a busy time: three spacewalks in 8 days can really fill your days and I felt that I needed to focus on my task 100%.

Having to run several hours of airlock ops and get two crewmates “out the door” safely and as quickly as possible is something that commands attention: by far the most demanding thing I have done on orbit and, the first time, definitely somewhat stressful.

Spacewalks are usually covered quite in detail on the internet, so I’m sure you guys already know more than I could possibly tell you. And as far as my job as IV is concerned, if you’re curious you can take a look at some training logbooks about Prep-and-Post classes, where we train airlock ops and pre-breath protocols. Check out for example Logbook L-70:

https://plus.google.com/+SamanthaCristoforetti/posts/HhCxe72awiq

Of course, some things are hard to practice on the ground. Take the SAFERs, for example, the jetpacks that are attached to the EMU suits for an emergency self-rescue in case of detachment from structure: on the ground we learn how to operate the latches that keep them secured to the suit, but it’s a whole different story to actually handle suit and SAFER in space. Heavy, bulky things don’t have weight up here, but they sure still have mass, hence inertia!

Anyway, everything went well, Butch and Terry did a stellar job outside, Anton was a precious help in the airlock and now we’re all catching our breaths as we settle into a less hectic work pace.

Also, we’re approaching fast the end of Expedition 42, which means that Butch, Sasha and Elena are getting ready for their fiery ride back to planet Earth next week.

Terry, Anton and I will be on our own up here for a couple of weeks, before Scott, Misha and Gennady join us towards the end of March.

Yesterday our soon-to-depart crewmates actually put on their Sokol suits for their pre-reentry leak checks and I have spotted Elena and Sasha practicing the Soyuz manual reentry on a simulator in the Service Module.

And we’re getting return cargo ready: today, for example, I took water samples from all our potable water delivery stations and stowed them for return on Soyuz.

Preparations for the next crew’s arrival have also begun. Yesterday I worked on stowing some cargo delivered on the Russian Progress resupply vehicle, which included Scott’s clothes and hygiene items.

We have our little space wardrobe in Node 2, close to our sleeping cabins: each one of us has a big rigid bag with our personal clothing supplies, mostly organized in Ziplocs that cover two weeks each (we call those “bricks”).

Butch, efficient as always, had already cleared his bag, so Scott… if you happen to be reading… your clothes are already nicely organized in Node 2 overhead! Not sure that they are enough for a year, though: I bet you’ll have more coming along the way.

Hey, by the way, yesterday was our 100th day in space! Well, technically that’s true only for me, since Terry and Anton had been in space before, but for sure it was our 100th day in space together. A bit scary, isn’t it? Compared to the time behind us, the time we have left already looks little, only a couple of months left.

Of course there are things from my Earthling life that I miss – a shower being pretty high on the list – but it will be really hard to leave the Space Station. In the past 100 days I have gone from uncontainable excitement and constant discovery to familiarity and a sense of quiet affection for the Station itself, our crew and the teams on the ground spread all over the world with whom we interact every day. It feels like home and, by the way, a home in which you can float and that offers an unbeatable view out of the window!
 
Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS qui:
http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio  aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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espero que algundia yo me encuentre  en tu posiscion
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L+76 to L+79: Logbook

It’s been quite a historic day here on ISS: the last of the Automated Transfer Vehicles of the European Space Agency, ATV-5 George Lemaitre, has just departed and is now safely separated from the Station, on track for a destructive reentry into the atmosphere tomorrow: it’s taking away tons of waste and discarded items, thus giving us quite a relief on ISS in terms stowage space.

But we’ll have time to talk about the departure of ATV and all the pre-departure ops in a future logbook, today let’s go back a few days and look at the departure of another vehicle earlier this week: Dragon! Last weekend was really busy here on Station as we got the last things ready to be loaded. I wrapped up the “Epigenetics” experiment on Saturday, fixating the last generation of our C. Elegans worms for return to Earth. Scientists on the ground took a look at the culture bags in the camera and reported that, judging from the color, the worms had been growing just fine, so hopefully there’s now three generations of space-born C.Elegans on Earth.

The weekend was also the time to reinstall in Dragon a number of cold-stowage facilities, called Polar and Glacier: these moveable fridges fly up and down powered by the Dragon power supply, but in between they are actually installed on Station. Moving them is quite time-critical, because we don’t want them to remain unpowered for more than 30 minutes, so Terry and I worked together on a timed choreography that allowed us to operate in parallel, minimizing power-off time.

Last but not least, there was a last-minute entry on our timeline on Sunday morning: the removal of a fan-pump-separator (FPS) on a EMU, the suit for spacewalks. In Logbook L+16,L+17 I have told you about the FPS, since Butch and I replaced one back in December. Unfortunately, the FPS has failed on another suit. We don’t currently have spares onboard, but it was decided that the failed one should be removed and returned on Dragon for analysis on the ground. Doing it the second time was not as daunting as the first time, especially since we did not install a new one, but it was still a challenging task to remove all the hard-to-reach, non-captive screws and washers! We were glad when we were done and could hand it over to Terry, so he could properly pack it for return.

Talking about packing, that was the big task for Monday. In the morning it was cold-stowage ops again, as Terry and I packed and loaded six cold bags with samples from our MELFI freezers. Cold bags are like coolers with a very thick insulation, in which samples for return are stowed together with cold bricks to keep them cool until they can be retrieved on Earth and put in an actual freezer again.  For each cold bags we had diagrams which showed exactly how they had to be packed and, in some cases, in what precise orientation.

Unfortunately, that’s one of those things that works a lot better with the help of gravity, because up here there’s nothing to keep all those items where you put them, until of course the bag is full and the lid will press everything in place.  Also, as you can imagine, packing cold bags is necessarily a last minute operation: we packed them on Monday morning and on Monday afternoon we closed the Dragon hatch. Terry and Butch then installed the controllers for the motors that drive the bolts keeping Dragon attached to ISS while I, In the meantime, took a trip to ATV to install the Break-Up Camera, which will actually observe the breakup of ATV from inside tomorrow!

Tuesday, of course, was release day. After a successful leak check of the hatches, making sure that neither Dragon nor ISS would have a leak when demated, Butch drove out the bolts, disconnecting Dragon from us, and then controllers on the ground started to fly the robotic arm to move Dragon to the release position.

In the early evening, Terry and I were ready at the robotic workstation in the Cupola to perform the release and send Dragon on its way home. At the release time, I ungrappled it and backed away the arm to a safe distance of about 4,5 meters. At that point, Terry sent the Depart command and Dragon performed its first burn, commencing a slow but clearly visible separation from ISS. Really strange to see it go, after having had it as our neighbor here in Node 2 for several weeks. But hey, we’ll get another one soon!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS  qui:
http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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+Melina Ramirez You're LAMEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE . Get up there - make a more interesting image or Story, or experiment or whatever. But yeah , first you have to get to "up there" ... lameR
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L+72 to L+73: Logbook

Today is Saturday and, wow, this has been a busy week! Not so much time to keep you updated on our work and life up here, unfortunately. But hey, we can still catch up a little bit, so let’s see what’s happened on the ISS earlier in the week.

This past Tuesday I did something that we don’t quite do every day: I depressurized a part of the Space Station to vacuum. Not an airlock, those actually exist for that purpose.

A vestibule: that’s the small volume that is created when two ISS modules are joined together. Just like if in your home you had not one door between rooms, but two, with a little space between them which becomes a little “room” of its own if you close both doors. On ISS we call that little volume between hatches “vestibule”.  Imagine you wanted to make sure that both those hatches do not leak – the best way to do this leak check is to depressurize the vestibule between them. If air gets into the vestibule, raising the pressure, there’s a leak in the hatch seals. Here is how it goes: you connect the vestibule volume to a vacuum access point and vent all the air overboard; then you measure the residual pressure, which will be very close to zero (in my case it was about 3 mm Hg) and then you wait 24 hours and check the pressure again. Of course, there is no such thing as a perfectly tight seal, some leakage will always occur.

In the case of the vestibule, my procedure called it a good leak check if the increase in pressure in the vestibule after 24 hours was less than 5 mm Hg.
I bet you’re curious by now… what hatches did we leak check and why? Well, I’m not sure if you’ve heard already, but we’re going to do some remodeling soon on the Space Station. Time to freshen up the room distribution a bit! Our PMM module, which is currently attached to Node 1 nadir, will be relocated to Node 3 forward and the Node 1 nadir port will get a luxury upgrade that will make it capable of receiving visiting vehicles. So we did the leak check on the vestibule between PMM and Node 1, to make sure that those hatches do not leak, because they will be exposed to vacuum when we do the relocation later this year. In addition, just before the leak check Terry and I installed a feedthrough: that’s something that allows a cable connection to go through a hole  in the pressure shell – you plug the cable on one side, let’s say inside, and then you plug the continuation of the cable to the other side of the feedthrough, let’s say outside. The feedthrough is inserted in a hole and has seals to make sure air doesn’t leak out.

You’ll be happy to hear that the vestibule passed the leak check, so both the hatches and the newly installed feedthrough are in good shape. Good news, ah? By the way, what you see in the picture is the long jumper hose that we used to connect the vestibule to vacuum: it had to reach all the way across the Lab to the vacuum access point. Maybe it’s just me, but connecting something to vacuum is definitely something that commands attention: there’s nothing particularly complicated in the setup to depressurize the vestibule, but I did double-check and triple-check it before opening the equalization valve that actually vented the vestibule atmosphere into space. In fact, I even had a feeling for a moment that my ears were popping, which would be a sign of the pressure in the cabin dropping; but the pressure indications were stable, so it was probably the hissing sound from the ongoing venting playing tricks on my eardrums.

Wednesday was one of those “keep-the-Station-in-shape” kind of days for me. Besides tearing down the leak check setup, I worked for example on an a periodic environmental monitoring activity that checks our potable water for coliform and other microbial growth in samples from our potable water lines after 48 hours of incubation. Luckily, I could report zero microbial colonies on the microbial capture device and no magenta color in the coloform detection packet, indicating a negative result. Always good to have confirmation that our drinking water is safe!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

  #SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS  qui:
http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa  ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por Carlos Lallana Borobio aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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sei grande a noemi mia figlia piaci tanto 
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Verona, Italy - Houston, USA - Trento, Italy - Bolzano, Italy - St. Paul, USA - Munich, Germany - Toulouse, France - Moscow, Russia - Napoli, Italy - Wichita Falls, USA - Treviso, Italy
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Astronaut at the European Space Agency
Italian Air Force Officer
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Somehow jet lag hasn't killed me yet.
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    Aerospace Engineering, 1996 - 2001
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