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Samantha Cristoforetti
Works at European Space Agency
Attended Technical University of Munich
Lives in Cologne, Germany
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Samantha Cristoforetti

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+Argotec chef Stefano Polato shows us one of the healthy recipes that is included in the bonus space food that ESA astronaut +Samantha Cristoforetti has with her on board the #ISS : whole red rice, chicken and vegetables, with the spicy and gilded touch of turmeric

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qku3aZpnU88
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Saluto dalla città di VIENNA! A AUT AUSTRIA! MIEI LINK CONDIVISIONE SCOPERTE TESTIMONIANZE FOTOGRAFIE! 
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Samantha Cristoforetti

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A bedtime story (in Italian) from ESA astronaut +Samantha Cristoforetti on the International Space Station. Samantha reads 'Il pianeta di cioccolato' (The chocolate planet) by children's writer Gianni Rodari.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzi6zrBeSF8

(Also available in Russian! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GRHkF07rlE)
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Big thanks for reading it in Russian too. It had a great success here. (:
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An interesting education video recorded by ESA astronaut +Samantha Cristoforetti on the International Space Station - all about centre of mass, freefall and orbits. With a guest appearance from our favourite ESA Kids mascot...

#education  
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I'm sorry but the video keep starting and stopping! ?????.........
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Samantha Cristoforetti

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L+159 to L+160: Logbook

Friday was one of those days when periodic bathroom visits are a bit more complicated than usual… it was time for another 24-hour urine collection, followed on Saturday morning by a blood draw, this time with “Scott the Vampire” who helped me fill up seven tubes of blood.

These collections were in support of the Cardio-Ox experiment, which I have talked about in the last logbook, as well as the “Biochemical Profile” and “Repository” projects of the Johnson Space Center.

https://plus.google.com/+SamanthaCristoforetti/posts/axE9J9sP6ZY

These are not actual experiments, but rather aim at providing data that can potentially support a variety of research, both current and future, into the human adaptation to spaceflight. 

“Biochemical Profile” tests urine and blood samples for a number of proteins and chemicals, which are known to be significant indicators of the metabolic state of the body (biomarkers): a database is created and data can be made available to researchers who request it to support their investigations.

“Repository” is a similar concept, but with an eye to the future. Urine and blood samples are collected and stored long-term under controlled conditions and will be made available in the future to researchers who make a solid scientific case for having them. In the future scientists will be able to test those samples with more advanced analysis methods and they might even be interested in biomarkers that are still unknown to us today!

I concluded my 24-hour urine collection with the first toilet visit on Saturday morning, but three hours after breakfast I did fill one more tube, together with a saliva sample, for the Italian experiment Bone Muscle Check, which aims at validating the analysis of saliva samples to quantify the reduction of bone and muscle mass. If reliable biomarkers can be found in saliva, one does not have to rely on much more invasive and time-consuming blood draws!

In the picture you can see some of our laboratory equipment for human research, including the urine collection bag. As you can imagine, peeing in a cup wouldn’t work very well up here. I remember testing a new female adapter on my very first parabolic flight almost exactly 5 years ago – in the cabin of the ZeroG aircraft, but inside a special tent!

I’ll also confess that I had some urine collection devices with me in Baikonur and I practiced with them before launch. In the end, there’s two things that you really want to be very familiar with when you’re about to launch to space: your spaceship and everything that has to do with using the toilet!

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio 
http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE) Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de

(Trad Russo) +Dmitry Meshkov http://samlogbook-ru.livejournal.com
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As a Med student, I find this log quite funny. Lol! 
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Samantha Cristoforetti

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L+155,  L+156: Logbook

Another week has gone by on ISS, one of my last on board. Time sure flies when you’re having fun!

Well, the biggest news of this past week, as I’m sure you’ve heard, is that the Russian resupply vehicle Progress 59P didn’t make it to ISS.

On Tuesday morning we received a call from Houston saying that Mission Control - Moscow had downmoded the mission profile to a two-day rendezvous, as opposed to the standard 6-hour profile that would have had Progress dock to ISS by early afternoon.

Of course, there’s a lot of minor issues that can force a transition to a 2-day profile, so at that point we still expected to see Progress pull up in its parking spot by Thursday. We know now that 59P will never make it to ISS. Mission controllers in Moscow have valiantly tried all they could with the available telemetry and commanding capability, but unfortunately all efforts to recover the resupply mission have been unsuccessful.

The focus of the community has now shifted from the recovery attempts to analyzing the mishap and finding the cause. We’ll know more once our Russian colleagues will have concluded the investigation which, inevitably, will take a while.

In the meantime, teams are assessing the impacts to the ISS program: what is the consumable situation? How about trash removal capability that has been lost? What are the implications for the next Soyuz launch and, consequently, the impacts on ISS activities?

As you can imagine, it’s a complicated problem and, as is often the case, I’m happy that I’m just an astronaut and I’m only responsible for carrying out my tasks up here. People on the ground have a much tougher job, especially these days!

The good news is that we’re not going to run out of food, water, oxygen or any other vital consumables any time soon – we have plenty on margin. On humanity’s outpost in space no astronaut is going to bed hungry!

And we’re busy as usual keeping the Space Station in shape, transferring cargo and, of course, doing science. On Tuesday, in particular, as the Progress story unfolded, I spent most of the day working on the final session of the Italian Space Agency experiment Drain Brain: ultrasound session in the morning, plus breathing sessions with the pletismographs morning and afternoon. If this doesn’t ring a bell, you might have missed my L+57, L+58 Logbook, where I talked about Drain Brain!

https://plus.google.com/+SamanthaCristoforetti/posts/i3QRgYGo76Q

Congratulations to the team on the completion of the experiment!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por
+Carlos Lallana Borobio 
http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE) Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de

(Trad Russo)+Dmitry Meshkov http://samlogbook-ru.livejournal.com
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=^.^=
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Samantha Cristoforetti

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L+150: Logbook

Hey, I didn’t forget that I promised to talk to you about the NATO experiment!

On Wednesday I wrapped up NATO by removing the experiment containers from the Kubik incubator and putting them into the MELFI freezer, their biological state being frozen until researchers on the ground can get hold of them and do their post-flight analysis.

The full name of the experiment is Nanoparticles and Osteoporosis and, like Osteo-4 from the last logbook, it studies the bone. But while Osteo-4 is interested in determining the mechanisms that make us loose bone mass in microgravity, NATO want to see what we can do about it and, in particular, if a particular type of nanoparticles could be effective in counteracting bone loss.

See, it’s not very intuitive, but bone is a living tissue that is constantly destroyed and reformed. Cells called osteoclasts destroy bone, other cells called osteoblasts produce new bone. As long as destruction and production are in balance, everything is good, but in weightlessness this balance is disturbed and osteoclasts win. That’s also what happens when people suffer of osteoporosis, unfortunately a common problem!

NATO observes in vitro the effects of adding to bone tissue  various doses of “strontium-containing-hydroxyapatite-nanoparticles”, or nHAP-Sr. Some ground studies have suggested that adding nHAP-Sr could be effective in impeding osteoclasts in their bone-destructing job, which would promote a more favorable balance in the bone destruction/production cycle. A promising research for us astronauts in space and for people on the ground suffering from bone loss!

But it’s not science all the time up here of course. We do need to keep the Station up and running, which also means periodically changing the Recycle Tank in our Urine Processing Assembly, or UPA. You can see the UPA in the picture, it occupies the deck area beneath our space toilet. What’s left of our urine after being processed in UPA, a dense greenish and not-so-pleasant-smelly liquid called brine, is collected in the recycle tank, which of course needs to be swapped when full.

But I did end the day with another cool new experiment called Nematode muscle. I’ll tell you all about it next time!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa  ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por
+Carlos Lallana Borobio
http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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I have a wish right now...to have an astronaut friend like you😄....i pray that all of you there is in good condition may God bless your mission...thank you so much miss + Samantha Cristoforetti....🍃🌹🍃🌹🍃🌹🍃🌹🍃🌹🍃🌹🍃🌹🍃🌹
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Samantha Cristoforetti

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“The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy has a few things to say on the subject of towels…”  ESA astronaut +Samantha Cristoforetti marks #TowelDay on the International Space Station #TheAnswerIs42

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpQfWLkKbhw
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شاد و سالم و امید وار بمانی ... سامانتا!

Happy and healthy and hope to stay ... Samantha!
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Samantha Cristoforetti

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L+170: Logbook

Have you heard the news?

Today,  Roscosmos, the Russian Space Agency, has officially announced that our landing is delayed until early June, which means that… Terry, Anton and I get to stay a few extra weeks in space! 

As I’m writing this I just can’t believe that our original landing date was tomorrow and I would now be about to jump in my ISS sleeping bag for the very last time. I suppose I wasn’t mentally ready to leave quite yet, partly due for sure to the fact that this change of plans has been in the air for quite some time.

After the loss of Progress 59P two weeks ago, we all immediately realized that the next Soyuz launch would likely be delayed to buy time for a full investigation, implementation of any corrective actions deemed necessary and possibly the launch of another unmanned vehicle first.

Whether our return would be postponed as well was less clear: on the one hand there are obvious advantages in having a full crew complement onboard, on the other hand we had just lost a cargo resupply ship and consumables might have been an issue (turned out they aren’t).

As we waited for the ISS partner agencies to make a decision, we were scheduled last week for all the activities required to keep us on track for a nominal landing: we performed a leak check of our Sokol pressure suits (leak check passed!); we fit checked our Kentavr compression shorts; we continued to pre-gather cargo for our Soyuz, including our personal 1,5 kg allocation and we packed our few other personal items for return to Earth on Dragon. Anton and I refreshed our manual reentry skills.  Since a final decision about delaying our landing had not been made, we had to be ready.

However the Soyuz thrusters’ test, which was scheduled early on Friday morning, was canceled and at that point it was clear that we weren’t going home on May 13th. Ready and happy to stay!

And no worries: I still have underwear, socks and even one of my bonus food containers left. I’m really glad that I saved some of those basic supplies, just in case! I was also able to recover a couple of brand new T-shirts that I had already used to wrap some Dragon return items: they might have some glue residue from the gray tape on them, but they’ll do the trick if I need them!

Talking about Dragon, looks like Terry and I will unexpectedly be around for the full SpaceX-6 mission: we’re diligently packing and loading bags clearing space on ISS, which is always welcome.

We’re also doing more preparatory work to move PMM to the Node 3 forward location and… who knows?  The actual move might actually happen soon, instead of next summer. Since we’re not going anywhere for a while, the planners will find ways to make good use of our time onboard.

And I would be thrilled about enjoying, even for a few days, a 360 degrees unrestricted view from the Cupola!

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa  ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio 
http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE) Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de

(Trad Russo)+Dmitry Meshkov http://samlogbook-ru.livejournal.com
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Deve essere bello non avere lo stress del METEO OGNI MATTINA!!!!!! 
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Samantha Cristoforetti

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ESA astronaut +Samantha Cristoforetti continues her tour of the ISS, with a look at the International Space Station toilet!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-65mBQ7s_Q
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che originali che sono quelle divise !
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Samantha Cristoforetti

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L+157 to L+158: Logbook

Another weekend is over, only one left on the Space Station. The big event of the weekend of course was the first espresso brewing, which we can now even enjoy in 3D-printed zeroG cups… I’ll tell you all about that in another logbook, I promise.

For now, I still have to catch up on last week’s activities! 

Wednesday was the day when we declared victory on Dragon unpack… and seamlessly moved on to the next fight: packing and loading!

As you might remember, we had done a little bit of pre-packing before Dragon even showed up, pre-staging bags with a nice green “SpX-6 Return” label and a unique number on the Node 2 forward endcone. Now it’s time to fill up those bags with more return items and, of course, prepare many more bags.

It’s nice to be able to start loading things into Dragon. With both the newly arrived cargo and the cargo that will be returned stowed on ISS right now, the logistic situation can be challenging: in PMM, our main stowage modules, most rack fronts are covered with big bags secured with bungees, so getting things in and out of the actual stowage compartments takes some work and patience!

As for science, Wednesday and Thursday I worked mainly on the ongoing TripleLux-A experiment and on my last session of Cardio-Ox.
Cardio-Ox is the short version of the name, by the way. If you’re curious about the full name of the experiment, here it is: “Defining the Relationship Between Biomarkers of Oxidative and Inflammatory Stress and the Risk for Atherosclerosis in Astronauts During and After Long-duration Spaceflight.”

If you had the patience to read through the end, the name really says it all! It is reasonable to suppose that spaceflight, due to exposure to radiation, altered food intake, reduced physical activity and an overall stressful environment, may cause an increased level of oxidative stress and inflammation.

Both these undesirable conditions can be indirectly measured by determining the concentration of certain molecules in blood and urine: these molecules are  the “biomarkers” in the experiment title. So, the first result of the experiment is to actually quantify oxidative stress and inflammation and for that purpose I have provided several blood and urine samples during the mission.

But the second part is: how do oxidative stress and inflammation correlate with the risk of atherosclerosis? To determine that, I have performed several remotely-guided ultrasound observations of my carotid and brachial arteries, looking for structural and functional changes that are considered good predictors of atherosclerosis risk. By the way, this is a long term study: the last post-flight session will be 5 years after flight.

Not sure I will still be writing logbooks at that point, but just in case, if you’re curious, look for that R+1825 entry!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa  ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por
+Carlos Lallana Borobio 
http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE) Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de

(Trad Russo)+Dmitry Meshkov http://samlogbook-ru.livejournal.com
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wow! are you ok up there dear?  lol! :-)
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Samantha Cristoforetti

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L+151 to L+154: Logbook

After working on a number of new experiments early last week, on Thursday I spent most of my day working on cargo ops, mainly unpacking those gigantic bags that, as I mentioned earlier, we moved out of Dragon and temporarily stowed on Station while we unloaded  urgent science.

You can never tell how long it will take to unpack a bag just by looking at the number of items it contains: even a few items can take a long time if the stowage locations are challenging. Let’s say, for example, that you have to rotate a rack to get to a stowage compartment that is located in the aft, curved part of the rack, the one that lies against the cylindrical hull of a module.

Rotating a rack in itself is not complicated, but often you have to move stuff out of the way of the rotation path: bags, cables, computers, cameras… and then put them back once you are done. Imagine rotating part of your wall at home to access a secret room in the back, except that you have plenty of stuff attached to the wall and to the ceiling!

Anyway, I owe you some words about the Nematode muscle experiment I worked on last week. First of all, please welcome back to the International Space Station our good old friends, the C.Elegans. Yes, thanks to their very well understood genetic makeup, these tiny worms are a very popular model organism, on and off the planet! Remember the Epigenetics experiment?

But let’s talk about this new experiment. As the name implies, it’s about muscle, and specifically muscle atrophy. It’s very clear by now that muscle atrophy is a consequence of spaceflight and it makes sense intuitively, but we don’t understand yet the basic biological mechanisms that lead to loss of muscle mass.

See, we astronauts can counteract these negative effects by working out every day, because we are healthy. But what about sick people who are bed-ridden? Understanding the molecular mechanisms that cause muscle atrophy could be useful in finding ways to help them!
Like so often in science, Nematode muscle is a follow-up experiment that builds on previous space research.

The team has already established a few years ago that if you fly C. Elegans to space they will have a reduced protein concentration in muscles and in the cytoskeleton (the “bones” of the cell). Also, quite interestingly, their metabolism will shift to an energy-saving mode. Now the question is: how do cells receive signals that induce those changes? How is the message conveyed? And, for those of you who are into biology, I’ll add that the insulin/IGF-1 signaling, in particular, will be investigated, so see if it can account alone for the metabolic changes. Or maybe, on the contrary, there’s more out there to find out about how cells “get the message”. Fascinating stuff!

The weekend, by the way, was pretty quiet up here. We even got most of Friday off to recover from working two weeks straight, which was nice. Terry and I are heading home in just a couple of weeks and there’s still a lot to be done to wrap up our Space Station life and get things ready to welcome the next inhabitants of our outpost in space.

P.S. Many thanks to +Dmitry Meshkov who is now translating this logbook in Russian, starting with the most recent ones.

And of course, renewed thanks to the Italian, French, Spanish and German translators of #SamLogbook for their continuing amazing work. You guys rock!
 
Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par  +Anne Cpamoa  ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por
+Carlos Lallana Borobio 
http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de

(Trad Russo) +Dmitry Meshkov http://samlogbook-ru.livejournal.com
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"resistere un minuto più degli altri" Grazie mi è stato d'aiuto mi sono laureato in matematica.
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Samantha Cristoforetti

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L+149 Logbook

Another day of science yesterday here on humanity’s outpost in space!

First, you’ll be happy to hear that the BRICs I talked to you about in the last logbook are happily chilling out at -98deg Celsius in one of our MELFI freezers: after I activated the experiment on Monday, the microbial cultures remained at ambient temperature for about 24 hours and then it was time to put them in cold stowage, where they’ll remain until they can be returned to Earth.

Yesterday I also performed the third and last run of the Osteo-4 experiment, which came up on Dragon last week. It’s a set of three trays, each one hosting three bioreactors with a culture of mouse bone cells. The aim is to investigate the mechanism of mechano-transduction, which basically means that bones tissue “senses” mechanical forces and responds with a particular behavior. That’s probably why we lose mass in space: in weightlessness there isn’t much load on or skeleton, so the response of our body is to reduce bone mass. If we only could convince our body that we’ll go back to Earth within a few months and all that bone mass will come in handy! To try and send that message we put mechanical stress on our bones by working out every day on a machine, ARED, that simulates weightlifting.

Anyway, back to our experiment, the point is to study gene expression in osteocytes in microgravity: that’s because osteocytes, which are the most common cells in bone, are the mechanosensors of the bone; they are responsible for sensing mechanical loads and inducing appropriate biological responses. How this mechanism works, however, is still a bit of a mystery. Here comes Osteo-4 into play!

As for my contribution, my job was to remove the bioreactors from the trays they are installed in, to  reconfigure the ducting to close all the loops and then put the bioreactors in cold stowage. What made it a bit more cumbersome than it otherwise would be is that, as you can see in the picture,  I had to work in the disposable glovebox… my good old friend from the fruit flies experiment, remember?

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por
+Carlos Lallana Borobio 
http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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Sam sono invidioso quando ti vedo volare/nuotare nelle "stanze" della ISS come spesso facevo nei miei sogni ed in casa mia da ragazzo (oggi 77enne) mi elevavo e muovevo con l'aiuto della volontà! Oggi seguendo te ed i tuoi colleghi vorrei poter leggere i nomi delle "stanze" che percorri per conoscere la tua esatta posizione nella stazione orbitale. Saluti cari Delio da Bari 
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  • European Space Agency
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Currently
Cologne, Germany
Previously
Verona, Italy - Houston, USA - Trento, Italy - Bolzano, Italy - St. Paul, USA - Munich, Germany - Toulouse, France - Moscow, Russia - Napoli, Italy - Wichita Falls, USA - Treviso, Italy
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Introduction
Astronaut at the European Space Agency
Italian Air Force Officer
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Somehow jet lag hasn't killed me yet.
Education
  • Technical University of Munich
    Aerospace Engineering, 1996 - 2001
  • Italian Air Force Academy
    Aeronautical Science, 2001 - 2005
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ESA/EAC Linder Hoehe 51147 Cologne Germany