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Samantha Andrews
Ocean Oculus: Science & Stories from the Sea
Ocean Oculus: Science & Stories from the Sea
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+NASA Goddard +International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) & the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management are trying to figure out why otherwise healthy dolphins, whales and porpoises strand on the coast. If they can figure it out, they might be able to predict when and where strandings are most likely to occur - which means rescue teams can reach the animals faster.
Find out more from this rather awesome (8 minute) video https://youtu.be/1cAiLKP2F-U
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Looking for a job, Post-Doc, PhD, Masters in ocean/marine science? Looking for a conference? Want to get involved in some ocean-based citizen science? Take a peek here!
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Every spring humpback whales migrate to Newfoundland and Labrador to feast! Unsurprisingly, they attract a lot of attention from people too. Sometimes that attention isn't great for the whales and can put them - and people - at risk.

Find out more about these amazing creatures, and how to take care when heading out on the water to see them.

#whales #whalewatching #ecotourism #tourism
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It's flat, it's a fish, it's a.... winter flounder!

(and you thought I was going to say flatfish - which it is!)

Take a peek at this curious looking fish that lives in the western Atlantic Ocean - including a video of it swimming!

#marinebiology #marinescience #science #fish #flatfish #marinelife #sealife #sea #ocean #nature #wildlife #fisheries #fishing #speciesatrisk #marineconservation #climatechange
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Take a look at this week's Jobs, Post Docs, PhD, Masters, and other opportunities in ocean/marine sciences around the world.
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Some good news! Last month nine migratory marine species have been added the "Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals" (bit of a mouthful!).

Why is this good news?

Well the Convention requires States that have signed up to actually work together to protect these species.

Take a quick look at the 9 species who appeared this year - including the blue shark you can see in the image below.

Image credit: Credit Mark Conlin/NMFS (Public Domain)

#oceanoptimism #conservation #ocean #marinelife #marinebiology #sharks #seabirds #rays #seals #speciesatrisk
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In this week's Sea Short, We take a quick look at these beautiful sea anemones - the flower (and predators) of the sea!

#marinelife #sealife #animals #wildlife #nature #ocean #sea #marinebiology #rockpools #anemone #bamfield #canada #anemone #seaanemone
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This week's Jobs, Post Docs, PhD, Masters, and other opportunities in ocean/marine sciences around the world.
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Sometimes CCTV catches acts of kindness... like three teens in Poland giving a sleeping homeless person a duvet

#notallheroeswearcapes
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Scallops Feed by Filtering

These tiny little critters are baby scallops!

Scallops are a type of mollusc known as a bivalve. This means that their bodies are compressed into a shell that comes in 2 halves, linked by a hinge at the back. When the scallop closes up its shell, it is protected from many predators. When it is open, it can eat – which (if you look closely) is what you can see happening in this video.

In the water there are lots of tiny organisms that the scallop likes to eat. When the scallop opens its shell, water moves in and the tiny plants and animals are trapped in the scallop’s gills. This is called filter feeding.

On some of the scallops, you will see shiny dots around the edge of the shell. These are its eyes! Depending on the species, scallops can have up to 100 eyes but they aren’t like ours. They are developed to see in places with poor light – just like on the ocean floor, and are actually very complex. With these eyes they can keep an eye out for predators, and on the concentration of particles in the water so they can decide if it’s worth feeding or not.

Video credit: Samantha Andrews

#marinelife #marinebiology #sealife #sea #ocean #biology #wildlife #nature #scallops #animals #molluscs
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