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Sallys Rocking Horses
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Antique and Collectable Rocking Horses
Antique and Collectable Rocking Horses

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New on our website is this delightful Lines Bros Sportiboy rocking horse. He has had a restoration replacing his original detachable saddle and bridle with fixed ones - probably more practical.
This one dates to circa 1927, as although his triang badges have been lost, there are two sets of nail holes either end of the base, each of two holes, side by side. This would have been for the circular badge, replaced after 1927 by a triangular badge that would have required three nail holes or two lengthways down the stand.
Anyway, Lester as we have called him, is a sympathetically finished horse in excellent condition for a nonagenarian!
You can view him on www.sallysrockinghorses.com/RockingHorse17.html
Image may contain: people sitting and outdoor

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New on our website is this delightful Lines Bros Sportiboy rocking horse. He has had a restoration replacing his original detachable saddle and bridle with fixed ones - probably more practical.
This one dates to circa 1927, as although his triang badges have been lost, there are two sets of nail holes either end of the base, each of two holes, side by side. This would have been for the circular badge, replaced after 1927 by a triangular badge that would have required three nail holes or two lengthways down the stand.
Anyway, Lester as we have called him, is a sympathetically finished horse in excellent condition for a nonagenarian!
You can view him on www.sallysrockinghorses.com/RockingHorse17.html
Image may contain: people sitting and outdoor

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Autumn is a very busy time at Sallys Rocking Horses, of course our passion for antique toys extends a little beyond just rocking horses, this carriage, ideal for some bears who would like a carriage to ride in, is just an example.
We have a range of new stock like this that isn't on the website yet, though plenty are.
www.sallysrockinghorses.com/rocking_horse_page.html to see just how extensive our collection is.

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There are a number of new rocking horses coming onto our website over the coming week. One that won't be appearing however is this Collinsons.
In need of some restoration, I'm hopeful of him being ready for Christmas, as he would indeed make a fine present. On the other hand he can be purchased "as is" much cheaper if you wanted to do the work yourself. We can include all the parts or material you will need to do the job. Why not just message me and we can come to some arrangement?
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German rocking horses.
Prior to the Great War, Germany, was the up and coming manufacturing country then (in a similar way to China today.)
They made large numbers of toys for export, expecially to the USA. Amongst rocking horses, hide covered horses (in calfskin) were common.
This week's post features a rocking horse on my website I've called Chippendale. He's a very large bow rocker, but is otherwise typical of the style of rocking horses coming from Germany circa 1880-1914. The bow is typically shallow, compared to the English rocking horses.
There are few people left now who can fit a hide, in any case it would detract from the aesthetic value of such an old horse, so restoration is limited to repairing the existing hide. A common problem is the sewn seams on the horse "open", the dried hide is rigid and can't really be pulled back into shape.
In this instance I have been intending to fit a wide martingale to cover the widest opening in the hide, not a perfect solution, but probably the most practical. Somemore work also needed on his bow, so Chippendale is very much still a job in hand.
You can see him on
www.sallysrockinghorses.com/RockingHorse61.html
At 55" he is a big rocking horse, but not without a certain charm.

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On the subject of unusual rocking horses, up until the Great War, 1914, some rocking horses were "suspended" by ropes from the ceiling. I would imagine this arrangement required some engineering by Dad at home. Gamages store in London marketed the "Gamages Gee Swing" with illustrations of this arrangement.
I would imagine that most suspended rocking horses found themselves on conventional Marqua stands eventually.
One find on mine did indeed come on a Marqua stand, but featured two bolts through the body and the mouth unusually enlarged were the bit goes. I have just published him on www.sallysrockinghorses.com/RockingHorse51.html
Just got to find some rope now!

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An unusal item just published on Sallys Rocking Horses is an Adams Tally Ho set. Edward Adams was a jockey who patented a design for a toy to teach children how to drive a cart or carriage, a usefull skill in 1910 when he did this.
Of course we were all soon learning to drive motor cars and children took to toy cars instead. Still the idea was simple enough, a pair (or even a set of four) toys horses mounted on a wheeled from were propelled into action by the "driver" pushing on a pole attached to a waist band.
Doubtless reins and whip in hand, the young driver set of on many an adventure.
Certainly toys have played an important part in learning, not sure were computer games are taking us though.
This delightful item is on www.sallysrockinghorses.com/RockingHorse77.html
Enjoy, there will be more photos later, and we are looking for some of the missing parts, such as wheels.
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I dabble in contemporary rocking horses at times, expecially if they catch my eye for some reason.
This latest acquisition should find it's way onto my website at some point next week, with luck. It's laminate construction, as in my last post, but again a bit different.
I suppose the limitations of this method of construction bring out creativity in other directions. He is posed to jump a fence, which is cleverly positioned to support the front of the horse.
Anyone for show jumping!
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A modern method of making rocking horses, especially if it is intended to make a number of them is laminate construction.

Basically this is clamping and gluing pre cut shapes of plywood out and then sanding off to make a horse. The cutting can be computer controlled to a good quality fit and sanding is not a highly developed skill.

The limitation however is that designs are basic, plywood does not lend itself to fine carving. Two manufactureres in the 1980's got round this with some innovative designs. By making the patterns of plywood fit together well they produced a reasonably attractive rocking horse. Ian Armstrong was based in Durham, whilst down the other end of the country, in Devon, Relko was working to their own designs.

You can see these rocking horses on these pages.
www.sallysrockinghorses.com/RockingHorse79.html and
www.sallysrockinghorses.com/RockingHorse60.html
Enjoy
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4/22/16
2 Photos - View album

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Some old rocking horses arrive with us with that have had a paint job or two done over their long lives. Many people don't appreciate "condition", so they simply paint it. A nice coat of gloss white Dulux being common.
Of course nothing lasts forever, so after a few years, even the paint job is looking tired.
At this stage we might look at re-painting properly, as a dapple grey for example. However, before doing so, it may be well worth a look at what was painted over.
A little light chipping on this example revealed the original paintwork underneath was still mostly intact. It will need some touching up of course and then finishing with a lacquer coat to protect the old paintwork, but it looks far better than over painting again.
An antique needs to have a bit of character to demonstrate it's age, re-painting would have made this old rocking horse look new. Still each to their own.
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