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Ryan Duggan
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CYTO University Webinar Series

Do you want to up your social media skill level to Ninja?  Trying to figure out ways to market your flow cytometry core facility services to a wider group of potential users?  Head over to today's free CYTO University Webinar where I'll be walking through some of the key strategies to getting the biggest return on your most precious investment...your time. There's still time to register for this free webinar. We'll get started at 12PM Eastern.
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Ryan Duggan

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Here we'll have a discussion covering many topics relating to the BD FACSDiVa platform including software and hardware.

Some items include:
-Tips and tricks to help streamline your FACSDiVa experience
-What to do now that Windows XP is no longer supported
-Common troubleshooting steps to take when errors pop up.
-The future of FACSDiVa
-Any other specific questions you have.

If you have a specific nagging question regarding FACSDiVa, you can ask it here on the event page comments, or on Twitter using the hashtag #allthingsfacsdiva 
Cytometry on Air - All Things FACSDiVa
Thu, April 3, 1:00 PM
The Web

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Join us for the Shared Resource Laboratories Forum at this year's CYTO 2014 Conference.  Dinner and Drinks will be served!  Make sure to choose Yes I plan to Attend under the Shared Resource Lab Forum section when registering for the meeting on cytoconference.org.

The forum, The Well Connected Facility: Online and New Media Tools for the Well Connected Cytometry Lab will feature an array of tools, tips, and strategies for marketing and managing your facility. Together these tools will give your facility renewed confidence in providing high quality services in an efficient manner while expanding your user base within and beyond your own Institution.

Have your own tip or trick?  Feel free to comment below, share on Twitter, or create your own post using the #CYTO2014SRL  hashtag.  You can do so before, during, and after the forum.  And don't forget to check back here at the event page regularly to read how others are using technology to manage their facility.  
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Ryan Duggan

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Ryan Duggan

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Have you seen +The Arcanum?  It sounds like the perfect model for learning flow cytometry.  I explain how it all works in this installment of the +UCFlow blog.  

It almost makes me want to become a glass explorer so I could guide people through an assay - from staining techniques, to setup and acquisition, and even data analysis.  Gamification of the entire process simply sweetens the deal.  
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Ryan Duggan

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Happy New Year! We scared the bejeezus out of the dogs (and the kids) with the addition of our confetti popper. Fun stuff.
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Ryan Duggan

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Probably one of the coolest things I've done in a while.  Ziplining in a Cave at Mega Cavern in Louisville, KY.  They had one run of nearly 1000 ft where you could reach speeds over 30MPH.  It's a really good time if you're ever in that part of the world.
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Here we'll have a discussion covering many topics relating to the BD FACSDiVa platform including software and hardware.

Some items include:
-Tips and tricks to help streamline your FACSDiVa experience
-What to do now that Windows XP is no longer supported
-Common troubleshooting steps to take when errors pop up.
-The future of FACSDiVa
-Any other specific questions you have.

If you have a specific nagging question regarding FACSDiVa, you can ask it here on the event page comments, or on Twitter using the hashtag #allthingsfacsdiva  
Cytometry on Air - All Things FACSDiVa
Thu, April 3, 1:00 PM
The Web

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23 comments
 
Ryan, thank you, that was very nice. I especially liked Crises' comment on the fact that we are running/patching 20 y.o. software/hardware and we should not expect twittering centrifuges or anything like that from BD anytime soon. "Where are the feasts we were promised? Where is the wine, the new wine? (Dying on the vine)"
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Ryan Duggan

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This article brings up many of the same old issues with "Impact Factor" and how it influences publishing which in turn influences funding and positions - so I won't bore you with rehashing that.

However, I'm still waiting for some real solutions to the problem that find the happy median between what I would call the majority rule democracy (100% open access non-peer reviewed) and the elite oligarchy (a few select choose the winners and losers) - both of which are no good for many reasons.  

I agree that peer review must be part of the biological sciences publishing model, but perhaps with a twist.  I don't really care who is submitting a paper for review, but i care greatly who has reviewed the paper, what those reviews were, how they were responded to, and who put the final stamp of approval on it.  I think greater transparency on the review process is what will bring about better published works in the end.  I can fully support the open peer review process (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_peer_review).  I truly believe the next wave of publishing scientists will whole-heartedly gravitate to a process like this instead of the current standard.  People of this generation have no problems making their name and thoughts public, which I think is the biggest hurdle for yesteryear's generation (btw, "generation" in this context has less to do with numerical age, than with old vs. modern philosophies).  I would love to make my reviews of articles public (if the journals would allow it).  It would be useful for others to see criticism, and it would make me a better reviewer.

Think about it this way.  If a work published in a non technical journal uses a highly technical application (for example, CyTOF) and I know that Gary Nolan reviewed that portion of the paper, I'm going to attribute a lot more credit to the validity of the results.  Working in a technical field (Flow and Image Cytometry) I can't tell you how many times I come across suspect data and methods.  It would be great for me to dive deeper into the review process so I could see if my questions were addressed, and possibly have a way to interact with the content post publication (a la Faculty of 1000).
 
"De facto, there is a journal hierarchy – and probably always will be. The question is how the system can be made better"

http://www.theguardian.com/science/occams-corner/2014/jan/06/radical-changes-science-publishing-randy-schekman?CMP=twt_gu

#academic    #publishing  
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I also agree that a more transparent publishing process (meaning, accessible to the readers) might overcome some of the problems that the current system has. Regarding the role that "high impact "publications have in the allocation of grants discussed in the The guardian article, I think that solutions to the problem must be accompanied by the broad implementation of some other "measures" is scientific productivity and impact ( if this is the right adjective ) such as the eigenfactor and the H index in order to decide who receives the funding. In my country (Mexico) there is a national system called SNI (that stands for national investigator system) which ranks all investigators in different categories, and there are five levels, so, you can apply as a young investigator for resources and the consolidated ones are evaluated in their categories, these scheme provide opportunities for young investigators to be productive and to develop innovative projects without the need to be publishing in cell or science early on their carrers. 
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Paul Young's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Flow Cytometry Core Facility Director
Employment
  • University of Chicago
    Flow Guru, present
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Chicago
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Chicago
Story
Tagline
Wielder of lasers, flow-er of cells, writer of cytometry technology.
Introduction
Interested in Flow or Image Cytometry, why not join the +Cytometry Community.
Education
  • University of Chicago
    Psychology, 1996 - 2000
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Male
Birthday
June 13
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Ryn Dggn, UCFlow
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