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Whoa, wait, what? orange?! What does this mean?
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Brian Hermon's profile photoJake Weisz's profile photoRon Amadeo's profile photoSiavash Golkar's profile photo
53 comments
 
I always wondered what Google would use as a replacement for the grey indicator for no internet connection.
 
It means you're not connected to the 
Google servers, similar to when they would be grayed out before.
 
+Philipp Drexler This happened when I just walked in the door and it connected to WiFi, so no Google connection could be a possiblity.
 
Hold on. The orange is an official color? I thought it was the ROM I was using. Looks like crap.
 
Same for me but its only a few sec orange so i think its 100% the Google connection
 
dominant color of your personal photo?
 
I don't know why they would use orange instead of an outline 
 
Snap... I thought it was because it visually matches your profile photo. Dynamic Theming... Imagine that!!!
 
I think it's like white in Jelly Bean, when it's about to get connected. But since they're using white as the connected colour in KitKat, they're using orange/brown (chocolate colour? ) as the 'connecting to' colour. 
 
Yep, it's the "no connection to google/gcm/etc." color that replaces the old gray. It's part of making the uncommon/error state stand out more than the common/everything's working case.
 
+Ron Amadeo did they fix the inconsistencies of the quick settings (i.e. long press for some, short for others)?
 
white/orange, is a lot easier for most people to distinguish between white/gray colors when connected to servers. I know that the color shade from gray to white is one that some people have a hard time telling the difference between. 
 
+Adam Powell oh, cool, thanks. It never shows up in the status bar though? I miss all the communication that used to happen up there.
 
+Adam Powell That's nice/helpful. Not everyone understood the grey/blue bit. Please do it on the status bar though, if it's not there now.
 
It's orange to match the background on your picture :-) 
 
+Marat Levit Hey, I never knew you could do that (long-press in the quick settings menu)!
 
I liked the blue in the status bar, since it showed that internet is actually working.  This came in very handy, especially when connecting on WiFi services where you have to connect through the browser.

How does KitKat show the status?
 
It seems Canonical finally got Ubuntu to power the latest and greatest phones. It's just that Google doesn't know it yet.
 
+Skyler Call haha well there you go, learn new things everyday... You can long WiFi and Bluetooth but you single press Airplane mode... So no consistency there. Was wondering if +Ron Amadeo picked up any changes. 
 
If we've learned anything from the DMV, and we have, It means your connection should prepare to stop short of the intersection.
 
+Matt Wilkins I'm sure they will but I had CM 10 on my Samsung GSII and unfortunately it was just too unstable... I prefer stock standard from Google.
 
Obviously you will be getting Android Mandarin Orange soon...
 
Using orange to show a dead/error state makes more sense than grey. I could also point out that orange is on the opposite color spectrum from blue.
 
Regarding the long press for enabling/disabling wifi, etc., I know I've mentioned this to +Ron Amadeo before but it's the difference between a common, high-level feature that a lot of people use (airplane mode) and a power user, low-level feature that isn't meant to be part of a common usage pattern. (Toggling individual radios on and off.) Switching networks or selecting one in general is meant to be far more common than twiddling radio power, so it's given the easier access.

The power user community has, predictably, disagreed with this decision. ;)
 
+Adam Powell I'm not following what you're saying about twiddling radio power, etc. I think the feeling is that the WiFi toggle should turn WiFi on and off with single taps, just like aeroplane mode works, instead of taking you into WiFi settings and requiring a long press for a simple toggle. These are not power user actions, just everyday things. Instead, we get an extra step and inconsistency. 
 
While looking into peculiar Orange I found JellyBean's BeanBag easter egg & DayDream substituted by KitKat's DessertCase. Judging from sourcecodes seems like desserts reunion are actually happening. Little suprise for me no one covering it, yet. +Android Police 

Res: https://android.googlesource.com/platform/frameworks/base.git/+/kitkat-release/packages/SystemUI/res/drawable-nodpi/
Code: https://android.googlesource.com/platform/frameworks/base.git/+/kitkat-release/packages/SystemUI/src/com/android/systemui/DessertCaseView.java
 
+Ron Amadeo One of the things that I have noticed running Kit Kat that I haven't seen mentioned yet is that the Toast messages that come up got an updated look. They seem to match the overall UI now.
 
+Liam Harper Turning wifi power on and off is most certainly a power user action, therefore it's a power user shortcut on long press. You may disagree but that perspective is why it behaves the way it does. For the vast majority it just works if you leave wifi on full-time. Poor connections that the system doesn't avoid automatically and manual battery micromanagement are the edge cases.
 
Obligatory Orange is the new Black reference. Please discard. But, honestly, as a color blind person, this is easier for me than the green/blue/whatever color it used to be before.
 
+Liam Harper It's definitely somewhere I agree with +Adam Powell. Most people don't micromanage their radios on and off. Airplane mode, being comprehensive, is something many users do.

We should be thankful the long press exists, as previous versions did not include an on/off toggle method in that tray at all. ;)
 
+Adam Powell But single tapping the WiFi toggle, presumably and non-power user action, takes you into the WiFi settings where there are even more options. Why include it in the toggles at all if most people don't use it?
 
Ackward, totally miss your post due to infomation overwhelmed. BTW they are some comment on the source code side could answer something.
 
+Liam Harper Regular/normal users need to add Wi-Fi networks. That's a very common activity when someone goes somewhere new.
 
+Adam Powell I know this is off topic, but while we're on the topic of consistency, could you explain why the double tap and swipe to zoom works in opposite ways in Maps and Chrome? 
 
+Liam Harper That is possibly a better question. I have no idea. I just agree with him on the Wi-Fi bit, because +Adam Powell and I have discussed it before, and it's one of the things we actually agree on. Probably because the logic behind it is sound, and I was convinced by his argument.

+Abhilash Bingi I'm guessing he doesn't work on either app, but I could be wrong.
 
+Ron Amadeo read the official Android 4.4 guide from Play Books! They talked about this... and a lot more that I haven't seen covered elsewhere. Link incoming.
 
+Jake Weisz Well, I have to disagree. Every laptop I've seen since the dawn of the integrated wireless card has had a WiFi toggle button. It's not a function that's beyond most casual users. But in either case, the functionality of the toggles is inconsistent, and I think that's where this discussion started. 
 
+Liam Harper The Wi-Fi toggle button (or physical switch, as it often is) is actually the bain of all "normal" users. I rarely go a week without someone telling me their Internet is dead because they hit the Wi-Fi toggle and didn't know they did and have no idea how to even tell their Wi-Fi is disabled.
 
+Ron Amadeo I'm sure that you're please that this orange color is the same orange that you see in the desktop Chrome menu when there is a problem.
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