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Roger Parkinson
Attended Waikato University
Lives in Auckland
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Roger Parkinson

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Wildfly not logging anything? This is the fix.
I'm sure someone has a good reason for Wildfly's logging facility, but nothing actually logs for me until I follow these instructions, which basically turns it off.
For a newly installed JBoss WildFly 8 if your application is using log4j , there would not be any log in the file or console. 1. WHAT happened ?  There is no log printed in the console from deployed application in JBoss...
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Roger Parkinson

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Hilarious!
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"But secretly I'm not either...oh well, no one will ever know." hahaha
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Roger Parkinson

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Why workflow is so difficult.
Over the years I've done a bit of work with Workflow or Business Process products. Not quite enough to learn the difference between the two but enough to know what I like and what I don't like. Most of my recent work has been...
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I think visualizations for this kind of complex task are still immature. Things have come a long way in the last few decades, but there's still very little understanding of what makes a good visualization. Without a reasonable body of knowledge on that, it's nearly impossible to write the code that translates between the pretty diagrams and the real code underneath. Someday, this will change, but for the foreseeable future, you're completely right. 
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Roger Parkinson

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This saved me a lot of time. Turned a nasty problem into a simple one.
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The one that always gets me is "What about black-on-black crime?" Every. Damn. Time. The second one is the inevitable smear campaign on the victim. 
Every time a Black person is beaten or killed senselessly by a cop or vigilante, there are certain things we can predict to happen. Here's 10 of them.
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Roger Parkinson

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The article is about AIs that listen to your tone of voice, watch your body language to figure out how you're feeling. A couple of times they seem to be talking about machines that have emotions, but I think that's me misreading.

So here's a prediction. There will come a time when these things are common but not quite as good as humans are at reading us. Good enough though. At that point we will get into the habit of exaggerating things like our facial expressions for the benefit of the machine, a bit like we speak slowly and clearly (and with an American accent) to speech recognition systems now.

Then the machines will catch up and we'll stop doing that, although some of us will find it works quite well for our interactions with humans too (as does speaking slowly and clearly and, sometimes, with an American accent does) and we'll carry on dong it.
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I'm just about to watch the Kubrick produced film AI
Small print on the monitor too.
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This article has a U.S. orientation but the arguments seem to translate well to where I live too (NZ). We're in the negotiations for the TPPA. Apart from leaked drafts of the deal we're not supposed to know anything about it until it is signed and sealed. The leaks suggest we'll be screwed over by it. And then this story suggests even if we aren't it won't bring the promised benefits anyway. Still our trade negotiating minister gets a high profile out of it, so it's good for him. That's something, I guess.
 
Who gets the mansions? We get the ruins... Same old story!
The Senate advanced fast-track authority for the Trans-Pacific Partnership on Thursday.
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+Charles Vigneron "Are corporations people in New Zealand?" Well they can be sued etc because they are legal entities. They can't apply for state benefits but if they have really good lobbyists they can get propped up by the state. So I guess they are sort of people, sort of not. If I were a lawyer this might be a better answer :)
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Roger Parkinson

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I read about these critters a while ago. The story itself is interesting, about the 'missing link' between fish and land animals but I found something else that was (to me anyway) even more interesting. It was covered in a New Scientist editorial in 2006 which is still behind a pay wall or I would share it directly. Since I can't I'll try and describe what happened.
The palaeontologists figured out when land animals must have first occurred using genetics. It's apparently possible to work backwards from what we have knowing the rate of mutation etc to when the split happened.
Then they took the geological record and asked themselves where to find rocks from that period.
And then they went and looked for fossils there (the Canadian Arctic, probably somewhere to avoid otherwise) and found them.
So there's a rather nice example of two different disciplines with different theoretical bases (three if you say genetics and palaeontology are different and you likely do) all syncing up. They effectively used all three to make a prediction (that they would find the fossils) and it paid off.
This is how to do real science. Propose a theory, find a way to test it by making a prediction, see if the prediction pans out. At that point you get to call your theory useful (or more useful if there have been other predictions that did the same). You never actually get to call it true, someone else can come along one day and present evidence that explains things a different way. But 'useful' is all they get too.
As far as most of us need to understand 'useful' and 'true' are near enough.
A fish called Tiktaalik that lived 375m years ago already had strong hind limbs – even though it still lived in water
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I thought cartoonists published in The New Yorker, and other cartoonists at other magazines and newspapers world-wide first proposed the idea? 
:-)
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Here's one in the eye for the #anti-vaxxers. Getting #measles rips up your immune system so you can catch something much worse. Don't think measles is bad? How about meningitis?
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I had it as a kid too. They told me it contributed to my shortsightedness, but I'm not sure they really knew. I've never had to prove I had it though. Interesting. The vaccination for it came here years afterwards, I forget when.
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We don't really use it either, but they did call it that back then so I guess that's the reason. It was very well done.
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Cosmology is hard work. That they can get any sense at all from such weak signals always impresses me. This suggests there might need to be some revision of dark energy, hopefully a simplification.
Astronomers have found that the type of supernovae commonly used to measure distances in the universe fall into distinct populations not recognized before. The findings have implications for our understanding of how fast the universe has been expanding since the Big Bang.
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+Jim Carver Well, that's almost certain.
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Tagline
Trying to train my sheep to be J2EE architects. This will take a while.
Introduction
I'm into building J2EE applications using Rule-Based frameworks. Boring? Okay, My wife and I live in an earth brick house designed to look like a Romanesque Abbey. It's out in the countryside and has a big garden, a domestic orchard and some pet sheep. I've made most of the furniture in the house out of native timbers.

In my spare time I write books (fiction) and publish them as ebooks.

If you follow me I'll take a look at your profile and, if you have a profile picture and some shares that look interesting I will follow you back. If you don't have those then I won't.
Bragging rights
Made most of the furniture in my house. So far only one thing has collapsed. Oh, it's two now. Heh. I also made the Galahad Manuscript, a poem calligraphed and illuminated and bound in leather. I also built the desk it sits on.
Education
  • Waikato University
    Computer Science, 1975 - 1977
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Work
Occupation
Software engineer (J2EE), writer and carrier of Mrs' shopping (um, I ought to have said that first).
Skills
Software (J2EE, C++, Unix, Microprocessors) with a special interest in rule based systems. The microprocessor stuff requires some electronics knowledge (so I know how to put a circuit together etc) plus some knowledge of 3D modeling for making various gadgets the micros are embedded into. I also write and self publish fiction.
Employment
  • Software engineer (J2EE), 2000 - present
  • Software Engineer (C/C++ Unix), 1990 - 2000
  • Software Engineer (Basic+ Vax Basic), 1978 - 1990
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Auckland
Previously
New Zealand
Excellent breakfast and friendly service
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
We just had coffee and a slice, but it was good coffee and a good slice. And service was friendly.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
5 reviews
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One of our regular spots. Flawless
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
cafe has good coffee & friendly staff
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago