Ok, cut the bullshit, please. Did you do any research on this yourself?

First of all, it does not withhold browser updates. Firefox is a level 2 update in Linux Mint, so that is, for starters, what we call FUD.

Second, the whole hysteria is about a system that prevents the system from breaking with updates, by withholding updates that may potentially break the system. Have a look at this dialog; http://www.muktware.com/wp-con...

Does this look like a hard-coded problem to you, or rather something that can be enabled or disabled as the user pleases?

Have a look at /usr/lib/linuxmint/mintUpdate/rules.
*linux-|*|5||May damage your system. In particular, if you have used envy to install nVidia or ATI proprietary drivers, do not install unless you understand how those drivers work.
linux|*|5||May damage your system. In particular, if you have used envy to install nVidia or ATI proprietary drivers, do not install unless you understand how those drivers work.

Kernel upgrades often break Xorg, as many long-time Linux/Ubuntu users may know. Security? Sure. But I still think the average user would rather have their desktop not breaking. When security gets in the way, it's implemented wrongly.
As the Xorg, it's the same story when using non-open source drivers. And unfortunately, most users still need those closed source drivers to have their system functioning properly.
If you're so concerned about security, you shouldn't use Xorg at all, in fact, since it can't distinguish input sent to separate applications, and thus a seemingly-innocent application can easily catch your bank account details which you input into Firefox.

Then, the boot loader... Are we Microsoft, now? Since when does the boot loader have so much influence on the security of a (desktop) system? Or is Ubuntu working on an own implementation of secure boot?

#Ubuntu   #linuxmint   #CanonicalHasWayTooMuchFunAttemptingToDrillOtherProjectsIntoTheGround  
Linux Mint may be putting its users at risk, a Canonical engineer has claimed.

The concern comes from Linux Mint's policy toward holding back updates for certain packages with known security issues.

#Linux  
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