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Robert Mondavi, DDS
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15 followers
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See how implants are used to replace missing teeth:
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Over the years, researchers have found links between oral health and various other health-related issues. These findings were initially surprising to many of our patients. One of the most recent, seemingly unlikely, such discoveries connects gum disease to the hormonal changes seen throughout the lifespan of women.

For many years dental professionals suspected that their female patients experienced more oral problems throughout their lives than male patients in the same age ranges. Compounding the puzzling nature of this finding is the fact that overall, women tend to practice careful oral hygiene whereas men tend towards being lax with dental care.

After spending years examining data and chronicling the lives of test study patients, dental research experts discovered there is a high incidence of gingivitis (early stage gum disease) at every hormonal stage, or milestone, of a woman’s life.

• PUBERTY- The increase in numbers of females with gingivitis in this group connects to the rapid rise in hormones which change the overall condition of a patient’s mouth. These changes include increased sensitivity to brushing and swollen gums prone to bleeding.

• MENSTRUAL CYCLE- The symptoms are occurring in conjunction with a woman’s monthly menstrual cycle often vary considerably between patients. The most common evidence of gum disease at this time occurs several days before the onset of menstruation. The gums tend to be sore, swollen, red, and bleeding. At the end of the menstrual cycle, the dental problems tend to go away on their own.

• PREGNANCY- It stands to reason that at a time in a woman’s life marked by monumental changes, the hormones involved in pregnancy bring gingivitis, bleeding gums, dry mouth, and loose teeth. These symptoms usually go away after the baby is born.

• MENOPAUSE- While menopause brings a plethora of physiological and emotional changes to women, it also ushers in dry mouth, tender and dry gums, bad breath, and bleeding gums.

While there are no definitive remedies for the oral changes associated with hormonal swings, the best thing all women can do is to have regular dental check-ups and practice excellent oral hygiene. Visit to learn more.
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Lava crowns are one of the most aesthetically pleasing dental crowns available today. See how these crowns can improve your smile:
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With full mouth cosmetic crowns, you can get the smile of your dreams. See how:
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Staying up to date with cutting-edge advancements in dentistry is something that our dentists take very seriously. We also believe that sharing information and new findings with our patients can help them to enjoy excellent oral health.

Experts in the fields of cardiology and periodontology combined individual knowledge bases creating a joint report which demonstrates the link between oral and cardiac health. While historically some practitioners discount the connection, research shows the relationship between these two disorders.

LINKS BETWEEN PERIODONTAL AND CARDIAC DISEASE

• A significant connection exists between gum disease and coronary artery disease. Studies show that gum disease exposes the risk of problems with blood vessels, in general. Those with gum disease also had issues with oxygen delivery to the brain. Insufficient blood delivery to your brain often leads to a stroke. Research shows that people with fewer teeth and a higher rate of gum disease have a higher incidence of stroke. Additionally, studies noted that patients with peripheral artery disease frequently have gum disease; both disorders feature inflammation as a central component.

• Patients who exhibit moderate to severe gum disease have higher levels of C-reactive protein, which rises throughout the body when inflammation is present. C-reactive protein is commonly used to diagnose a person’s risk of heart attack.

• Periodontitis and cardiac illnesses share more than one connection. Those patients with gum disease have a 53 percent greater chance of having a heart attack than those with healthy gums. This happens because once bacteria associated with periodontal disease enter the bloodstream, they cycle throughout the body and return to the heart where damage occurs.

• Though not as prevalent as the other cardiac maladies, endocarditis also is strongly associated with gum disease and tooth decay. Endocarditis is a cardiac disease where your heart’s inner lining (the endocardium) is inflamed. This inflammation comes from bacterial infections which travel through the body via the bloodstream. Even though endocarditis is relatively uncommon, its effects can be fatal. While there are several entry points for bacteria which cause the lining inflammation, poor oral hygiene and gum disease are among the most common factors leading to endocarditis.

We believe it is necessary for you to be aware of potential health risks; poor oral care effects more than your smile. If you have questions, please reach out to our office, and our dentist will gladly discuss them with you. Learn more at
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"Thank you the entire staff! They really made this rather "unpleasant" experience much more pleasant! Thanks to them my teeth are back to being perfect." Rashi J.
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