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Robert Wozniak
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I bought a batch of breadboard power supplies that are behaving very badly.
I noticed that the LMS1117 LDO Regulators on them have a strike through the AMS logo. Do you suppose that these could be rejects or counterfeits? The problem is that when they are powered from the 5V Mini-USB power input jack they get very hot and fluctuate the output voltage unless I add about 100uF capacitors on the output. Without the capacitor they burn out after several minutes. The Quiescent current with the capacitor added is about 5mA, and it is between 850 and 650mA before it burns out. Interestingly they seem to work fine when powered from 6.5 to 12 V through the 2.1mm input jack. The problem repeats on 8 different boards and with 3 different USB power supplies.
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2/4/18
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I bought a batch of breadboard power supplies that are behaving very badly.
I noticed that the LMS1117 LDO Regulators on them have a strike through the AMS logo. Do you suppose that these could be rejects or counterfeits? The problem is that when they are powered from the 5V Mini-USB power input jack they get very hot and fluctuate the output voltage unless I add about 100uF capacitors on the output. Without the capacitor they burn out after several minutes. The Quiescent current with the capacitor added is about 5mA, and it is between 850 and 650mA before it burns out. Interestingly they seem to work fine when powered from 6.5 to 12 V through the 2.1mm input jack. The problem repeats on 8 different boards and with 3 different USB power supplies.
PhotoPhotoPhoto
2/4/18
3 Photos - View album

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I bought a batch of breadboard power supplies that are behaving very badly.
I noticed that the AMS1117 LDO Regulators on them have a strike through the AMS logo. Do you suppose that these could be rejects or counterfeits? The problem is that when they are powered from the 5V Mini-USB power input jack they get very hot and fluctuate the output voltage unless I add about 100uF capacitors on the output. Without the capacitor they burn out after several minutes. The Quiescent current with the capacitor added is about 5mA, and it is between 850 and 650mA before it burns out. Interestingly they seem to work fine when powered from 6.5 to 12 V through the 2.1mm input jack. The problem repeats on 8 different boards and with 3 different USB power supplies.
PhotoPhotoPhoto
2/4/18
3 Photos - View album

Has anyone found an adhesive or solvent to bond NinjaFlex?

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My friend Tina is a Speech Therapist at an impoverished elementary school in Southern Virginia. She has a campaign on DonorsChoose.org to purchase two Chromebooks for her classroom. I've known Tina since we were children growing up as neighbors in Dale City VA. Please consider making a donation to her worthwhile cause. Note that as of now, Google will match your donation 100%

https://www.donorschoose.org/project/speech-and-language-learning-with-a-chro/2464226

Thank You,
-- Bob
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You can create your own Donald Trump executive order by going here: http://hepwori.github.io/execorder/
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Controlling two LEDs individually from one microcontroller pin
Controlling two LEDs individually from one microcontroller pin
Someone reminded me about this technique when they needed more LEDs than they had available pins for a project they were working on.

More info here: https://forum.pjrc.com/threads/37070-Two-LEDs-from-a-Single-Pin?p=115578&viewfull=1#post115578

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Controlling two LEDs individually from one microcontroller pin
Someone reminded me about this technique when they needed more LEDs than they had available pins for a project they were working on.

More info here: https://forum.pjrc.com/threads/37070-Two-LEDs-from-a-Single-Pin?p=115578&viewfull=1#post115578

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Prop Shield Visualizer and Plotting Tool

Prop Shield is a Teensy Add on board that contains 10 DOF Mition sensing, a 2 watt Audio driver and APA102 Drivers.
  http://www.pjrc.com/store/prop_shield.html
I cobbled together a visualizer that adds the ability to log data from the Prop Shield to a log file.
It's built off of the OrientationVisualizer Processing sketch, and adds a keyboard command "L" to toggle logging to a data file on the PC.
The logged data is appended to the file, so the Kst plotting tool can update the plots in realtime.

Here's a link to GitHub repository: https://github.com/Wozzy-T-3/Teensy-...eld-Visualizer

It requires Paul Stoffregen's  NXPMotionSense Library:  https://github.com/PaulStoffregen/NXPMotionSense

Keyboard Menu (When focus is Processing graphics output window)
press H to show/hide Help
press F to show/hide Fps
press U to show/hide orientation Update rate
press N to show/hide yaw, pitch and roll Numbers
press L to open to start/stop data Logging
press Z or X to adjust yaw to match view angle
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