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Robert Smart
Works at Wombat Lang
Attended Trinity Grammar School
Lives in Melbourne
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Robert Smart

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This looks interesting:
http://thehackernews.com/2015/05/google-vault-microsd.html.
When I was doing security research I determined that a necessary component was a "Device for Human Signatures". This could make it pretty easy to build one. From http://grampsgrumps.blogspot.com.au/2013/11/the-key2key-project.html:

Device for Human Signatures

We want to make it possible for real world legal entities to interact via the network. What is needed is a way to link people to the network in a way that makes legal sense. The proposed solution will work for an individual representing themself, or for an employee with some delegated ability to act for the employer. We don't consider the possibility of combining these in a single physical device.
The solution is a Device for Human Signature, DHS. The DHS requirements mean that it must be a separate device, not part of a more complex device. The proposed device has the following characteristics:
It has biometric authentication which is unchangeably linked to the owner.
It has a private key that is generated when first activated. Only the public key ever leaves the device.
It has a black and white screen and a mechanism for scrolling the image left-right and up-down.
It has a way that the owner can agree to sign what is displayed on the screen. This is such that it can't be done accidentally, nor can it be done without simultaneous biometric authentication.
There is another mechanism to clear the current image without signing it.
The device is connected to the world by wireless mechanisms and/or cable. If a cable is plugged in then it only uses that, which is desirable for signing things that have privacy restrictions. Either way it displays any offered image and, if signed, it sends the signature back on the reverse route.
The user signs the extended black and white image. She is not able to sign it till she has used the scroll control to view all of it.
The image will always be created, by a defined and public process, from information in a computer friendly format (such as XML). For example one of the known processes will be "English". The information in computer format, and the well know translation process will be sent with the signature of the text when it is used for internal computer purposes. For legal purposes only the actual visible text applies.
Any computer software can "understand" the signed text by using the conversion process on the computer friendly variant and checking that the resultant image is the one that the user signed. E.g. the user might sign "pay $1000 from my account 061234567 to Example Company (ABN 1234) account 0698765". What they actually sign is an array of black and white dots which has the appearance of this sentence. However the receiving computer (presumably the bank) doesn't have to understand the visual dots because such signed documents always come with an accompanying computer friendly structure which converts to the image in a well defined mechanical way. The signed document comes with an accompanying solution to the problem of determining its meaning.
It is important to sign a picture rather than "text", because it removes questions about how the text was rendered, and as we see it works just as well.
The signing device is only intended to be used for important things, or to create a temporary delegation to some more practical computer system which will sign as needed to act on the network within that delegation.
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What can we make of google's offer to host every photo and video for free? The advertising targetting value can hardly be worth it. Maybe they've got a secret way of storing write-once read-only data very cheaply. But one can't help thinking that the benefits for the Intelligence services will be huge...
Will I be using it? Certainly. Nothing of interest to anyone in my photos.
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Olgarchy has a win
The linked story is mostly the story of how the would-be oligarchs in the fossil fuel industry hijacked the US nuclear regulatory commission for a time. My feelings about the super-rich are ambivalent. Without the huge wealth disparities of the time I don't think we could have had the Renaissance or the Enlightenment. Without the efforts of the super-rich today I don't think humanity can achieve its destiny of saving this planet and moving beyond it. The triumph of the United States comes from the creative tension between the very rich on the one hand, and democracy and the rule of law on the other. Oligarchy by itself leads to stagnation and so, in a different way, does highly egalitarian democracy because the ordinary voter hates change.
http://atomicinsights.com/tale-of-two-chinas-one-surging-forward-one-retreating/
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Very nice video. We need a positive vision for the future to run against the end-of-progress visions run by the anti-nuclear coalition of Greens and the fossil fuel lobby. Rewilding the world has to be a big part of that. We can only do it with lots of cheap energy.
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Robert Smart

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As of 43.0.2357.65 (beta channel) my LG Chromebase actually works. I.e. it no longer blows away nearly every open tab I'm not looking at because its running out of memory. 2gb should be enough to run a browser. [I used to handle 50 users on a DECsystem-10 with 1.25mb of memory (256K 36-bit words). No graphics of course.]
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Hmm, well could it be some extensions or addons possibly going rogue and using up more resources?
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While the US is considering a more confrontational approach to China, Australia has a macho PM who may well think that war will suit his agenda.
http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2015/5/15/china/engagement-containment-shifting-strategy-china
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[update: there have been some unconvincing denials about the B1s in Australia]
America seems increasingly agitated about the rise of China (e.g. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-05-15/united-states-sends-b-1-bomber-aircraft-to-australia/6471528 and https://plus.google.com/+AndreasSchou/posts/3wXu9QGfHh2).
Meanwhile anti-Japanese feeling is strong in China, while America and Australia are backing Japan. What are we (Australia) doing in the middle of this? It would be nice to link up with less macho (but still nuclear armed) friends: http://grampsgrumps.blogspot.com.au/2015/05/canzuk-to-canzewsi.html.
The US is beefing up its military assets across Asia, with Australian bases soon to host some of its most formidable strategic weapons.
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Robert Smart

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Unfortunately the Internet spreads lies faster than the truth. That's why we need a 4th arm of government that is elected and funded independently, has near-judicial power of investigation, to investigate facts relevant to public policy. A key job is to identify people trying to mislead. A key mechanism for misleading is the misleading question. Here the Internet's other grump gives us the run down. Training kids to detect lies is important.
http://www.thegrumpyprogrammer.com/2015/06/questioning-questions.html
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A small-game fallacy occurs when game theorists, economists, or others trying to apply game-theoretic or microeconomic techniques to real-world problems, posit a simple, and thus cognizable, interaction, under a very limited and precise set of rules, whereas real-world analogous situations take ...
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As the world drifts towards war in the far east and the middle east, Australia has the worst possible prime minister to make rational decisions in Australia's interest.
http://theconversation.com/abbott-prefers-to-stay-on-the-high-moral-ground-in-a-war-mired-in-murkiness-42337
Tony Abbott was asked on Monday whether, if the United States increased its troop numbers in the fight against Islamic State (IS) Australia would consider boosting its commitment.
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Reading the comment section of
https://mathematicswithoutapologies.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/univalent-foundations-no-comment/ is a bit like being a mouse hiding behind a rock watching angry elephants stomping around. Nobody ever mentions the secret reason for computer checked mathematical proofs. When the next Ramanujan comes along with some amazing insight, he doesn't need to find some Hardy to look at his stuff. He just sends the proof off to the automatic checker and it rings a metaphorical bell, just like when an amateur astronomer sees a new supernova, and bingo he's famous.
"No Comment" was Jacob Lurie's reaction when the panel of Breakthrough Prize laureates was asked, at last November's Breakthrough Prize Symposium at Stanford, what they thought of the "prospects fo...
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Scientists are finally looking at the benefits of sunlight beyond vitamin D production. Hear Dr Lucas from ANU:
http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/blog/vitamin-d-podcast-07-dr-robyn-lucas/#
Why does the interviewer repeat his point about vitamin D being a marker for sun exposure? I think his point is this: If we see that people with higher levels of vitamin D have better health then it might not be because of the vitamin D, it might just be because they have been getting more sunlight (or more exercise as Dr Lucas says).

It is shocking that governments don't spend more money on health related research that Big Pharma is not interested in.
Dr. Robyn Lucas shares her view on potential beneficial effects of sunlight beyond vitamin D production with Dr. Cannell.
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Thorium: An Alternative Source Of Energy?
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Commodities Analysis by Adam Taggart covering: . Read Adam Taggart's Commodities Analysis on Investing.com.

Mathematics Rising » Beauty, Passion and Computation
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I listened to a couple of interviews with Gregory Chaitin on the Closer to Truth website. They may have been part of TV episodes that I have

Claims of misuse of ‘hopefully’ etc make my blood boil, literally
theconversation.com

Recently on The Conversation, Baden Eunson argued that the current uses of “hopefully”, “literally” and “begs the question” were prime examp

Misty Adoniou
theconversation.com

There are a few key pieces of grammatical knowledge that can make an immediate difference to the quality of children’s reading and writing.

Food Irradiation Can Save Thousands of Lives Each Year | ANS Nuclear Cafe
ansnuclearcafe.org

Excellent report, Lenka. I would only add that having the “label” on irradiated foods causes anxiety in the radiophobic demographic, which i

Cheap Nuclear -- UC Berkeley's Per Peterson Pursues Radical New Design w...
thebreakthrough.org

What is the best design to make next generation nuclear reactors safer and cheaper? That's the question everyone from Bill Gates to the Chin

White paper leaves carbon questions unanswered
www.smh.com.au

Economists and environment groups have rounded on the Abbott government’s Direct Action climate change policy after key details of its centr

Tom Wigley: Why nuclear power may be the only way to avoid geoengineering
bos.sagepub.com

Next Section Abstract In this interview, climate scientist Tom Wigley says that waiting to take significant action on climate change makes i

How we know so much about asteroids…#ARKYD
www.planetaryresources.com

We know more about asteroids, than the Earth beneath our feet.

Modeling Financial Instability
www.debtdeflation.com

This paper will be published in a forthcoming book on the crisis edited by Malliaris, Shaw and Shefrin. In what follows, I derive a correcte

"Energy in Australia" book
bravenewclimate.com

Graham Palmer, a regular BNC community member, has published a new book. It is titled "Energy in Australia: Peak Oil, Solar Power, and Asia'

Schneier on Security: Consumer Manipulation
www.schneier.com

Consider, first, confusion by design: Las Vegas casinos are mazes, carefully crafted to draw players to the slot machines and to keep them t

OPUS 500: A retrospective
thonyc.wordpress.com

This is, and I don’t really believe it myself, the five hundredth post here at the Renaissance Mathematicus. This is generally regarded as a

What made Canada become a country with the highest incidence of inflamma...
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Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (which includes both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease [CD]) emerged and dramatically increased in the

The Venn Diagram of Christmas Traditions
crispian-jago.blogspot.com

I love Christmas. I love everything about it, apart perhaps from the predictable fundamental Christians bleating on about the so called War

nice place, good coffee.
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