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Robert Kern
Attended California Institute of Technology
Lives in Cambridge, UK
206 followers|9,232 views
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2013 was the year I discovered how to take PhotoSphere panoramas with my phone. This thing loves churches.
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Kilchum castle has a magic window to cartoon world in photo 9. I want to go there. Thanks for sharing.
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One step closer to Chickenasaurus. I love the future.
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Fascinating experiment, but what a wretched piece of science reporting! The reporter confuses signalling changes (what seems to have really been done), DNA manipulation, and species evolution. Anyone know of a decent commentary on the paper? (Or the paper itself, for that matter?)
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Bat-pollinated flowers specifically shaped to reflect echolocation sounds effectively.
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Certainly corn would not make it, and wheat would be sub-optimal because the heads no longer "explode", don't know any others offhand.
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Suitable home defense option in England?
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No indication of the kind of steel they're using. Not even a Rockwell hardness number. Extra charge for "heat treated" eyeroll They might even be...stainless....

But thanks to your post +enki wa is now asking me to source a wakizashi from the master blacksmith in Japan that forged my knives.
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Robert Kern

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Look to the skies! No seriously, if you have a "decent-sized telescope", try to get a peek at a nearby supernova!

It occurs to me that I don't really know what scale his "decent-sized telescope" is calibrated against given that he has worked on the Hubble. Oh well!
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Wouldn't that make it 25 Million years and one day old? ;)
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This is a long time overdue.
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Yes, both, and yes. So it's not quite the same as what they're proposing here.
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I don't have nearly the music theory background necessary to truly appreciate this, but I'm glad that there are people who do.
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I should show this to my gf, she is a music theorist 
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For the field free region, here is an example of using a superconductor to shield modest fields:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092145260401083X

The disadvantage here is that one is using a superconductor with a rather low transition temperature. There is work being done in the neutron scattering community to use high temperature superconducting films to do the shielding. There is an alternative technique in which mu-metal is used to try to trap flux from outside fields (the shielding is not as good as with using a superconductor, but it doesn't require cryogens :>). I'm not sure what advantages would be offered by this proposed shield using a FM/SC for these use cases.

Now, there is another neutron scattering measurement which is done called "spin echo" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutron_spin_echo) in which a polarized neutron interacts with a sample (magnetic or non) and we measure how the precession of the neutron is effected by its interaction with the sample to learn about dynamics in the material. The technique is very sensitive to stray magnetic fields and even cranes moving overhead. The problem is that in the same facility, there are often experiments being run with 11 Tesla magnets--even though the falloff from fringing fields is steep, it is still a problem--so, we have people who have been working on trying to sense and actively cancel those stray fields (it's cheaper than shielding the other instrument)--it sounds to me that this would be the target application of this new shielding technique--if our active cancellation weren't perfect, we could use this to shield the remaining stray fields--but again, what the advantage would be over just using a superconductor or mu metal is not clear. You could also imagine using it when you wanted say for example shield magnetic materials from being detected...

Now, these are static applications--suppose you had a dynamic field (for example in a radio wave), could you shield the magnetic component of the wave? Would there be any use in doing so?
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It's 2011. This should be a punchline of a tasteless joke, not a headline.
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People
In his circles
149 people
Have him in circles
206 people
Mike Fletcher's profile photo
Robin T's profile photo
Douglas Pettway's profile photo
Eric Jones's profile photo
Rob Futrick's profile photo
Parth Buch's profile photo
Michael Liszka's profile photo
Hilary Mason's profile photo
Education
  • California Institute of Technology
    Geophysics, 1999 - 2003
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Gender
Male
Work
Occupation
Software Developer
Employment
  • Software Developer, present
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Cambridge, UK
Previously
Austin, TX
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