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Robert Hirsch
Works at Shandor Engineering
Attended Mostly RPI
Lived in New York
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Robert Hirsch

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Good vid. But disappointed the he specifically mentions that the government is responsible for maintaining the three tier system, but then bends over and still lauds the very masters he is trying to call out. He calls out that the economic stratification is as it always was, that our blood is all the same color but then raises the "black lives matter" flag.
 
Matthew Cooke video on history of racism in the U.S., and poverty.
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I'm afraid you lost me. How does "black lives matter" have more import than "all lives matter"?
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To start with, forcing people to do things is always bad policy.

Secondly, you think people are not voting because they can't get to it? 1/3 of the population is either not voting for a major party or not voting at all. They will simply vote for Donald Duck.

http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/obama-talks-transformative-idea-mandatory-voting
Is mandatory voting in the U.S. an idea whose time has come?
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If we force the living to vote, will we allow the dead to sit it out?
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Robert Hirsch

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This cucumber plant did great when I started it and quickly got three gorgeous cukes. After the third the cukes started being curly and the leaves started losing the deep green.

It still has flowers and baby cukes on it but it sure looks sad.

I gave it food. It's watered. I tried eggshells for calcium. Any ideas what I'm missing with this?

Or is the plant just done? Planted June.
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Aerate the soil, add nitrogen?
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Robert Hirsch

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what the? What? Does he understand where gays come from?
 
Rep. Louie Gohmert explains study placing gay men on island would prove that nature favors heterosexual marriage, calls for impeachment of SCOTUS judges.
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+Noel Yap "Whether something is natural has no bearing on whether it is right or wrong or good or bad."
Exceptions just prove the rule, right?
I think so. : )
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Robert Hirsch

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Seems that everything is hackable. So is automated weaponry an advantage or a weakness?
 
Hackers Can Disable a Sniper Rifle—Or Change Its Target

PUT A COMPUTER on a sniper rifle, and it can turn the most amateur shooter into a world-class marksman. But add a wireless connection to that computer-aided weapon, and you may find that your smart gun suddenly seems to have a mind of its own—and a very different idea of the target.

At the Black Hat hacker conference in two weeks, security researchers Runa Sandvik and Michael Auger plan to present the results of a year of work hacking a pair of $13,000 TrackingPoint self-aiming rifles. The married hacker couple have developed a set of techniques that could allow an attacker to compromise the rifle via its Wi-Fi connection and exploit vulnerabilities in its software. Their tricks can change variables in the scope’s calculations that make the rifle inexplicably miss its target, permanently disable the scope’s computer, or even prevent the gun from firing. In a demonstration for WIRED (shown in the video above), the researchers were able to dial in their changes to the scope’s targeting system so precisely that they could cause a bullet to hit a bullseye of the hacker’s choosing rather than the one chosen by the shooter.

“You can make it lie constantly to the user so they’ll always miss their shot,” says Sandvik, a former developer for the anonymity software Tor. Or the attacker can just as easily lock out the user or erase the gun’s entire file system. “If the scope is bricked, you have a six to seven thousand dollar computer you can’t use on top of a rifle that you still have to aim yourself.”

Since TrackingPoint launched in 2011, the company has sold more than a thousand of its high-end, Linux-power rifles with a self-aiming system. The scope allows you to designate a target and dial in variables like wind, temperature, and the weight of the ammunition being fired. Then, after the trigger is pulled, the computerized rifle itself chooses the exact moment to fire, activating its firing pin only when its barrel is perfectly oriented to hit the target. The result is a weapon that can allow even a gun novice to reliably hit targets from as far as a mile away.

But Sandvik and Auger found that they could use a chain of vulnerabilities in the rifle’s software to take control of those self-aiming functions. The first of these has to do with the Wi-Fi, which is off by default, but can be enabled so you can do things like stream a video of your shot to a laptop or iPad. When the Wi-Fi is on, the gun’s network has a default password that allows anyone within Wi-Fi range to connect to it. From there, a hacker can treat the gun as a server and access APIs to alter key variables in its targeting application. (The hacker pair were only able to find those changeable variables by dissecting one of their two rifles and using an eMMC reader to copy data from the computer’s flash storage with wires they clipped onto its circuit board pins.)

In the video demonstration for WIRED at a West Virginia firing range, Auger first took a shot with the unaltered rifle and, using the TrackingPoint rifle’s aiming mechanism, hit a bullseye on his first attempt. Then, with a laptop connected to the rifle via Wi-Fi, Sandvik invisibly altered the variable in the rifle’s ballistic calculations that accounted for the ammunition’s weight, changing it from around .4 ounces to a ludicrous 72 pounds. “You can set it to whatever crazy value you want and it will happily accept it,” says Sandvik.

Sandvik and Auger haven’t figured out why, but they’ve observed that higher ammunition weights aim a shot to the left, while lower or negative values aim it to the right. So on Auger’s next shot, Sandvik’s change of that single number in the rifle’s software made the bullet fly 2.5-feet to the left, bullseyeing an entirely different target.

The only alert a shooter might have to that hack would be a sudden jump in the scope’s view as it shifts position. But that change in view is almost indistinguishable from jostling the rifle. “Depending on how good a shooter you are, you might chalk that up to ‘I bumped it,’” says Sandvik.

The two hackers’ wireless control of the rifle doesn’t end there. Sandvik and Auger found that through the Wi-Fi connection, an attacker could also add themselves as a “root” user on the device, taking full control of its software, making permanent changes to its targeting variables, or deleting files to render the scope inoperable. If a user has set a PIN to limit other users’ access to the gun, that root attack can nonetheless gain full access and lock out the gun’s owner with a new PIN. The attacker can even disable the firing pin, a computer controlled solenoid, to prevent the gun from firing.

One thing their attack can’t do, the two researchers point out, is cause the gun to fire unexpectedly. Thankfully TrackingPoint rifles are designed not to fire unless the trigger is manually pulled.

In a phone call with WIRED, TrackingPoint founder John McHale said that he appreciates Sandvik and Auger’s research, and that the company will work with them to develop a software update to patch the rifle’s hackable flaws as quickly as possible. When it’s ready, that update will be mailed out to customers as a USB drive, he said. But he argued that the software vulnerabilities don’t fundamentally change the gun’s safety. “The shooter’s got to pull the rifle’s trigger, and the shooter is responsible for making sure it’s pointed in a safe direction. It’s my responsibility to make sure my scope is pointed where my gun is pointing,” McHale says. “The fundamentals of shooting don’t change even if the gun is hacked.”

He also pointed out that the Wi-Fi range of the hack would limit its real-world use. “It’s highly unlikely when a hunter is on a ranch in Texas, or on the plains of the Serengeti in Africa, that there’s a Wi-Fi internet connection,” he says. “The probability of someone hiding nearby in the bush in Tanzania are very low.”

But Auger and Sandvik counter that with their attack, a hacker could alter the rifle in a way that would persist long after that Wi-Fi connection is broken. It’s even possible (although likely difficult), they suggest, to implant the gun with malware that would only take effect at a certain time or location based on querying a user’s connected phone.

In fact, Auger and Sandvik have been attempting to contact TrackingPoint to help the company patch its rifles’ security flaws for months, emailing the company without response. The company’s silence until WIRED’s inquiry may be due to its financial problems: Over the last year, TrackingPoint has laid off the majority of its staff, switched CEOs and even ceased to take new orders for rifles. McHale insists that the company hasn’t gone out of business, though it’s “working through an internal restructuring.”

Given TrackingPoint’s financial straits, Sandvik and Auger say they won’t release the full code for their exploit for fear that the company won’t have the manpower to fix its software. And with only a thousand vulnerable rifles in consumers’ hands and the hack’s limited range, it may be unlikely that anyone will actually be victimized by the attack.

But the rifles’ flaws signal a future where objects of all kinds are increasingly connected to the Internet and are vulnerable to hackers—including lethal weapons. “There are so many things with the Internet attached to them: cars, fridges, coffee machines, and now guns,” says Sandvik. “There’s a message here for TrackingPoint and other companies…when you put technology on items that haven’t had it before, you run into security challenges you haven’t thought about before.”
Source: ANDY GREENBERG
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+Dr. Evilo a keyboard is a digital controller, not mechanical... or at least semi mechanical at most

if there are safes that have mechanical over rides for their digital locks, then im 99% sure they can do the same thing in a car ie: a self driving car can be forced into purely mechanical/manual mode when a user takes over the controls...

the only thing i will say is, by the time most people jump into the drivers seat & take over the controls you could be dead already, so there is that problem!!
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Robert Hirsch

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Hahaha. Strange, every single account of the economics I have read says something other than this economics wizard.
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Posting for me. Want to laser cut these pieces
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Human Vs. Robot: Bricklaying Robot Can Place 1,000 Bricks an Hour - Singularity HUB

'Building houses of brick is almost as old as human civilization itself, and over the millennia, we’ve perfected the art. The fastest bricklayers can mortar and place over 700 bricks an hour. Pretty fast.

But a new robot can lay bricks even faster.

Mark Pivac, inventor of the bricklaying robot, Hadrian, told PerthNow that his bot can place 1,000 bricks an hour, enough to erect the walls of a house in two days of round-the-clock work—a task that, on average, takes a human crew four to six weeks of hard labor.

The robot works a little like a 3D printer, similarly taking its cues from a digital 3D model of the structure it’s building. Instead of extruding plastic or sintering metal, it cuts bricks to size, mortars them, and precisely lays each in place using a grasper at the end of a 28 meter telescopic boom.'

http://singularityhub.com/2015/06/29/human-vs-robot-bricklaying-robot-can-place-1000-bricks-an-hour/
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I believe my next project will be a Drone Jammer (tm)

Then I will publish instruction on how you can make one.
 
I'm curious what folks think about this story.  Now technically, he's not in trouble for shooting the drone, just shooting his gun period.  I think what he did was perfectly acceptable, although I could swayed otherwise. Shooting a shotgun in the sky (at least here in NJ) could be dangerous as you might not know where the buckshot would end up.  But this was clearly an invasion of privacy.
McGruber writes: Hillview, Kentucky resident William H. Merideth describes his weekend: "Sunday afternoon, the kids – my girls – were out on the back deck, and the neighbors were out in their yard. And they come in and said, 'Dad, there's a drone out here, flying over everybody's yard.'...
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We are at that awkward point in history where camera drones are powerful enough to travel outside line of sight of their controller, yet large enough to be easily spotted.

That will end soon enough. At which point, we all get to learn that we're at that awkward point in history where it's possible to consider privacy possible.
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A note on cannabis oil

 
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Crazy
 
Fascinating. 

<quote> For decades now, I have been haunted by the grainy, black-and-white x-ray of a human skull.

It is alive but empty, with a cavernous fluid-filled space where the brain should be. A thin layer of brain tissue lines that cavity like an amniotic sac. The image hails from a 1980 review article in Science: Roger Lewin, the author, reports that the patient in question had “virtually no brain”. But that’s not what scared me; hydrocephalus is nothing new, and it takes more to creep out this ex-biologist than a picture of Ventricles Gone Wild.

What scared me was the fact that this virtually brain-free patient had an IQ of 126... </quote> 
For decades now, I have been haunted by the grainy, black-and-white x-ray of a human skull. It is alive but empty, with a cavernous fluid-filled space where the brain should be. A thin layer of brain tissue lines that cavity like an amniotic sac. The image hails from a 1980 review article in ...
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In his circles
917 people
Have him in circles
995 people
Jon Miller's profile photo
Noel Yap's profile photo
‫آبا اچ پی‬‎'s profile photo
Matthew Moynihan (The Polywell Guy)'s profile photo
JW Arlock's profile photo
Kieran Kearney's profile photo
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John Lilly's profile photo
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Communities
24 communities
Education
  • Mostly RPI
  • columbia prep
    1982 - 1986
  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    1986 - 1992
Basic Information
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Male
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Married
Story
Tagline
All your science belongs to me
Introduction
Look at that ugly mug in the picture. Now for some of you, you may have to imagine some hair on  that head. For others of you, you may have to imagine the tongue on the inside of the mouth. And for some others still, you may be more used to t-shirt, shorts and sandals instead of a tux.
Bragging rights
I recently played Dr. Katastroff in Queen Mabs Enchanted City in Troy New York. I spent a bazzilion years at RPI getting a PhD. I spent two years making creatures for movies in the 90's, woking on movies such as Hook, Radio Flyer, and Operation Dumbo Drop.
Work
Occupation
Endoplasm evangelist
Employment
  • Shandor Engineering
    Ectoplasm Manipulator, 2014 - present
  • H2Pump
    Director of Systems Engineering, 2008 - 2014
  • H2Pump
  • MTI microfuel cells
    2001 - 2004
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Previously
New York - Los Angeles - Troy NY - East Hartford CT