Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Robert Anstett
711 followers -
We do not stop playing because we grow old, We grow old because we stop playing.
We do not stop playing because we grow old, We grow old because we stop playing.

711 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment

Post has shared content
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
A friend is an enemy pointed in the right direction.

--wise old Martian saying I just made up

#amwriting
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Good news everyone,

We've released Google+ Exporter, an application that helps you to export your Google+ feeds (profile, pages, collections, communities, including all comments) to Wordpress eXtended RSS file.

Another available option is to export all posts published to profile, pages, collections, and communities to JSON file, including all comments!

Export up to 3000 posts with our free version.

I would love to know your opinion, suggestions or requests. Thank you!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Short test video for presentation.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Have you any Dreams you like your self....

Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
"It's a common expression to say that your brain is full. Although the brain doesn't literally fill up, in recent years researchers have discovered that the brain does sometimes push out old memories in order to take up new ones.

Now, a team at Scripps Research has shown for the first time the physiological mechanism by which a memory is formed and then subsequently forgotten. The research, which was done in fruit flies, looked at the synaptic changes that occur during learning and forgetting. The investigators found that a single dopamine neuron can drive both the learning and forgetting process. The study was published in Cell Reports.

"We believe this system is set up to remove memories that are unimportant and not necessarily supposed to last a long time," says first author Jacob Berry, Ph.D., a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Neuroscience on Scripps Research's Florida campus. "I find it elegant that all of this is done with the same neuron. Our paper highlights exactly how this is achieved."

To study memory in flies, the insects are conditioned to associate a particular odor with an electric shock. Once they've been trained, scientists observe that they subsequently avoid that odor, which confirms that the memory has been made. By monitoring the activity of neurons in the brain before and after the conditioning process, scientists can get an inside look at the physiological underpinnings of memory formation.

In earlier work, the Scripps Research team showed that there are specific dopaminergic circuits that are involved in both the formation of memory and the removal of memories. In the current study, the investigators used imaging techniques to look at the process in more detail. They discovered that when a behavioral memory is degraded, the cellular changes made during the learning process are reversed by the same dopamine neuron that helped form the changes in the first place".

Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The revised SI units that define our world:


The second is the time taken for a certain number of transitions in the state of a caesium 133 atom, which happens at a fixed frequency of 9,192,631,770 Hz


The metre is the distance travelled by light in a specific fraction of a second, defined using the speed of light in a vacuum of 299,792,458 metres/second


The Kelvin is the unit of temperature, defined using the Boltzmann constant for the energy of particles of gas at a given temperature, set at: 1.380 649 × 10–23 Joules/Kelvin


The kilogram is a quantity of mass, defined using the Planck constant set at: 6.626 070 15 × 10–34 Joules-second


The ampere is a flow of current, quantified using the elementary charge of electrons set at: 1.602 176 634 × 10–19 Coulomb


The candela measures light intensity and is defined using the constant Kcd: the brightness, per Watt, of monochromatic radiation at a specific frequency (540 × 1012 Hz) — namely 683 lumen/Watt


The mole is a quantity of atoms or particles, defined by the Avogadro constant set at: 6.022 140 76 × 1023 mol–1

https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2018-11-16/the-definition-of-the-kilogram-is-about-to-change-heres-why/10502194
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The light from Barnard's Star oscillated over a 233-day period, indicating the star was moving in a moderate ellipse at very roughly 1 meter per second. Think on that for a moment: That's a slow walk! Yet, from nearly 60 trillion kilometers away, it could be detected.

https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/big-news-a-planet-for-barnards-star-the-fourth-closest-star-to-our-own?fbclid=IwAR1EZVlQlQJo7XV1zqXmv6cvT9ANxCuw7Rw5zi7hmfumtAKXD69M1e8jMu8
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
“But for the 25,000+ other satellites in low-Earth orbit, there is no controlled re-entry coming. Earth’s atmosphere will take them down, extending far beyond the artificial edge of space, or Kármán line, that we typically draw. If we were to cease launching satellites today, then in under a century, there would be no remaining trace of humanity’s presence in low-Earth orbit.

Sputnik 1 was launched in 1957, and just three months later, it spontaneously de-orbited and fell back to Earth. The particles from our atmosphere rise far above any artificial line we’ve drawn, affecting all of our Earth-orbiting satellites. The farther your perihelion is, the longer you can remain up there, but the harder it becomes to send-and-receive signals from here on the surface. Until we have a fuel-free technology to passively boost our satellites to keep them in a more stable orbit, Earth’s atmosphere will continue to be the most destructive force to humanity’s presence in space.”

On October 4th, 1957, the world changed forever with the launch of Sputnik 1. One of the common questions that astronomers get asked is whether we can still see it or not. The answer surprises most people: not only can’t we see it, but it crashed back to Earth just 3 months after launch, before the United States even launched its first successful satellite: Explorer 1. Moreover, the reason this happened wasn’t due to any technical flaw or malfunction, but due to the simple physical fact that Earth’s atmosphere doesn’t end where we erroneously and arbitrarily define the “edge of space” to be. Instead, atmospheric drag affects all satellites in low-Earth orbit, and will eventually take down everything from the International Space Station to the Hubble Space Telescope.

Come find out how this works, and learn why over 95% of everything we’ve ever put in space is doomed to come back to Earth by the century’s end.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded