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Rob England
Works at Two Hills Ltd
Attended Victoria University of Wellington
Lives in Porirua, New Zealand
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...don't follow the glib and facile advice you find on the internet
 
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I'm prepared to entertain the possibility but it should be treated as the
exception.

P.s. I'm surprised nobody has picked me up on the self-referential
contradiction of this advice.
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And so the DevOps backlash continues....

FGS read the comments. Gold.

"in a start-up company the developer(s) had to play sysadmin too, all-too-often they don't really know much beyond the basics, and so you really don't want one, say, tweaking HugePages in sysctl.conf, or planning SAN or VM Farm expansion for the next web project, or lots of other things. Similarly, I refuse to dig any deeper in code beyond the simply Python tweak or the obvious fix/workaround, since I only know enough to be dangerous when it comes to all of the dependency chains, not to mention all of the subtle gotchas in all of the codebases I work with "
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Nailed it
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Hound these people. Shame them. Talk up. Don't take any crap. 
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Suddenly I get it: US patriotism.
This will seem like the blindingly obvious to most of you but I just twigged to why the USA is so nationalistic.  Every time I go there I'm struck by the flags everywhere (and the overt jingoism and militarism).
I was in the hydronic thinking booth this morning when it came to me why places like NZ aren't like that: we have one culture and one country.  The USA doesn't.  What do Alabama, California, and New Hampshire have in common other than that flag? (Not even a common language). 
It also explains uniting against a  common enemy...
Obvious really but I never thought of it before.  I'll be a bit more sympathetic in future 
(but only a bit!)
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Einstein once said, "I do not share the crusading spirit of the professional atheist whose fervor is mostly due to a painful act of liberation from the fetters of religious indoctrination received in youth."  I think it's common to converts, to religiosity, non-religiosity, or otherwise, to take up the flag of their chosen way of life with "fervor".  A whole lot of Americans were born elsewhere and came to America by choice.  And even those who were born here have parents, grandparents, or great-grandparents who were born somewhere else.  It's part of our national narrative!  We're a nation of converts, fundamentalists for our way of life.

I count myself as one of those fundamentalists.  I think America is great.  We're not the the only great country in the world, but we have something special.  Despite having such a diversity of ethnicity, ideology, culture, language, national origin, etc, etc, etc... we have our basic national identity, and the ideology of freedom and acceptance that is fundamental to it.

I think maybe that's what you're seeing.  A lot of people understand that about America, like you said, but it's rarely made explicit.
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I actually really like the idea, especially on a micro exercise level. Sounds like a great way to settle a stalemate in a client workshop. My skepticism is where the author argues for use in the corporate macro context.
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Heh. I've had a few people point this out to me, +Rob England. I am a pretty hardcore fan of bacon, but I think I'd have to draw a line on this!!! LOL

Thanks for the pointer to it ;-)
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If unscientific beliefs only impact the believer, I can live with it. We defend their right to believe.

When a woo belief impacts their children it is hard to stand aside and watch. Occasionally society steps in. E.g. when medical treatment is withheld by the parents.

When it impacts the children of others including our own newborn babies we do nothing. We even defend their right of choice. Why does society even tolerate anti-vaccination groups. These coalitions of the ignorant are a threat to our wellbeing and our grandchildren. They are the pinnacle of selfish stupidity and superstition and they are killing children they don't even know.

Why is that permitted? 
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This is pretty low, even for CNN. Why not mock a few Native American customs and see where it gets you? 
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I have a hunch, which I can't prove, that true innovation ONLY happens through serendipity. Someone is puzzling about X and they incidentally see Y and they realise in a serendipitous flash that X+Y=something new.
Therefore planning for, funding, seeking, or - god forbid - requiring innovation is pointless and stupid.
Sure you can create fertile ground for innovation. You can create a rich soup and simmer it, and you may get new life forming or you may just get soup.

Come on some of you philosophy grads help me out here...


Thanks +Aprill Allen for provoking that thought.






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I would agree with +Robert Fedoruk but would go even further to say that planning is also an option. By putting in place a framework to accept new concepts and take them forwards you can increase the chances of innovative ideas firming into something tangible.

The key is to make sure that fertile ground does exist and more importantly that someone/something isn't actively blocking innovation as radical thinking requires a very open-minded audience for it to progress past the drawing board.
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Work
Occupation
IT consultant and commentator, author
Skills
Writer, Speaker, Consultant. Content creation, provocateur, advice, improvement, behavioural change, process design, training.
Employment
  • Two Hills Ltd
    IT consultant, commentator, author, 2006 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Porirua, New Zealand
Previously
Melbourne, Australia - Christchurch, New Zealand - Hong Kong - Sydney, Australia - Dunedin, New Zealand - Invercargill, New Zealand - Waitomo, New Zealand - Waitangi, New Zealand - Wellington, New Zealand
Story
Tagline
IT commentator, consultant, author, "The IT Skeptic"
Introduction
Rob England is an independent IT management consultant and commentator based in Wellington, New Zealand. Rob is an internationally-recognised thought leader in IT Service Management (ITSM). He is a published author of several books and many articles. He is best known for his controversial blog and alter-ego, the IT Skeptic (blog, Google+). 

Awarded itSMF New Zealand's inaugural ITSM Champion for 2011. 
Best speaker  itSMF New Zealand national conference 2011. 
Credited in the acknowledgments as a contributor to the 2011 edition of the ITIL core book Service Strategy.  
The IT Skeptic won the popular vote for best "IT consultant and analyst" blog in the UK Computer Weekly IT Blog Awards 2010

Rob is an IT Certified Professional (ITCP).  

He is a member of the Information Systems Audit and Control Association, the IT Service Management Forum, the NZ Institute of IT Professionals (an accredited Member), and the NZ Skeptics.

More profile here

Bragging rights
I buy and sell books, toys, cars & houses online. My business, mail, docs & photos are in the cloud. My virtual friends outnumber the real. I G+ and email my son in the next room. I don't use Facebook.  I've had more houses in Minecraft and Second Life than I have in the real world.   OMG I'm a 21stC digital boy
Education
  • Victoria University of Wellington
    Operations Research
  • Massey University
    Adult Education
  • University of Canterbury
    Electrical Engineering
  • University of Otago
    Engineering intermediate
  • Bayfield High School
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Robin England