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Richardson Pest Solutions - Pest Control St. Louis
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Richardson Pest Solutions of St. Louis, MO, has been in the pest control business since 1972, creating a legacy in St. Louis of reliable, dependable service that gives their customers a sense that they will do what they say when they say it.  Chuck Richardson believes that showing up on time to appointments is the start of this. 
"All of our appointments, from the free estimates and quotes to the removal of pests, including termites, carpenter ants, odorous house ants, brown recluse spiders, and any other pest that's invaded your home, are made on a time.  We don't give you a range, we don't show up late.  We show up when we say we will and do the job you're hiring us to do."
This dedication to making sure that customers don't waste their time waiting around like the appointments that many local companies make. These companies give a time range for the pest control professional to arrive, leaving the homeowners and office workers waiting, unable to leave, for hours.  Chuck Richardson and Richardson Pest Solutions believe that your time is important, and hasn't ever seen the point in making an appointment that is inconvenient to the customer.
Richardson Pest Solutions of St. Louis, MO covers the entire St. Louis and St. Charles areas, giving the service that their 32 years in service can provide.  This experience makes them the best choice for any pest removal in St. Louis, from ants and termites to brown recluses and animals.  Contact them today at 314-649-7378 in St. Louis or 636-387-2400 in St. Charles to setup an appointment for a free inspection and free quote on how to proceed in ridding your home of pests today, and visit www.richardsonpestsolutions.com today for more information.

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Termite awareness, in St. Louis, needs to start NOW.  Finding the little buggers and making sure that they stay out of your home is as important as any home improvement project that you can undertake this spring.  But how can you make sure that you are finding and getting rid of these wood munching menaces?  Call a professional, National Pest Management Association verified pest control expert like Chuck Richardson of Richardson Pest Solutions.  Chuck has been exterminating pests in St. Louis since 1972, and can find and remove termites from your home or business with no fuss.  They also have a damage guarantee, giving you peace of mind that your home will be fine in their care.

How do you know that you have termites?  There are a few signs that indicate that it's time to call in the professionals.  You'll start to see the swarmers, or workers, piled up near windows and lights.  When you see swarmers inside the house, you're already experiencing an infestation that will only get worse as time goes on.  Seeing them outside isn't great either, as it indicates that they are near, and you need to "batten down the hatches" to try to keep them out.  Also, when you start to see wings piling up outside, it's time to call.  Swarmers discard their long, travel wings when they find the place that they want to reproduce.  Finding discarded wings shows you that they have picked your home or business, and that you need help.  This is a place where cobwebs can help you, as it is a place where the wings often catch, and are discarded.  Damaged wood is the third, and most obvious sign.  Any wood that is in contact with soil is ripe for termite infestation, as they will use this as a point of ingress, and then eat your home.

The importance of this time of the year for homeowners CANNOT be overstated.  Finding these signs before they turn into major infestations is the key to keeping swarms of termites from damaging your home or business, and costing you thousands in repair costs.  This is the only chance you'll have to spot them before they become a major headache and call a pest control professional.  In St. Louis, MO, call 314-649-7378 or 636-387-2400 and visit www.richardsonpestsolutions.com today for more information on termites, ants, raccoons, squirrels, and all of the other pests that Chuck Richardson can keep out of your home and business.

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By Chuck Richardson
Most people understand the basics about ants.  They live in anthills, they're highly socialized, and they steal your food.  Also, they have been known to ruin a picnic.  However, this information just scratches the surface of the fascinating world of ants. 

Grzegorz Buczkowski, a Purdue University research assistant professor of entomology, has discovered that odorous house ants, the main species that you'll see in your home in St. Louis, have colonies that grow larger and more complex in cities than they do in forests, which is their native habitat.  In a forest, they live in colonies of around 50 with one queen, but they become enormous "supercolonies" in urban areas, with over 6 million workers and up to 50,000 queens. 

"This is a native species that's doing this," said Buczkowski in the journal Biological Invasions. "Native ants are not supposed to become invasive. We don't know of any other native ants that are outcompeting other species of native ants like these."

Odorous house ants tend to live in hollow acorn shells when they are found in forests.  The name odorous comes from the coconut or rum-like smell that emenates from them when they are crushed.

In locations that are a combination of urban and natural, ie a park, Buczkowski said he observed colonies of about 500 workers with a single queen. He believes that it's conceivable that as the ants move closer to urban areas, they will have easier access to food, shelter and other resources. "In the forest, they have to compete for food and nesting sites," Buczkowski said. "In the cities, they don't have that competition. People give them a place to nest, a place to eat."

Buczkowski said understanding why the supercolonies form could lead to better control of the pests in homes, as well as ensuring that they don't outcompete beneficial species.

Future studies on odorous house ants will include studying the ant's genetics and trying to understand the effects of urbanization of odorous house ants.

For more information on how to rid your home of odorous house ants, carpenter ants, and other pests in St. Louis, MO, visit www.richardsonpestsolutions.com today, and call 314-649-7378 or 636-387-2400 to schedule a free inspection and estimate!
Reach the author at info@richardsonpestsolutions.com

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By Chuck Richardson
Researchers, scientists, pest control experts, and pretty much anyone who's heard of a termite knows that termites eat wood.  Well, technically, they eat the cellulose in the wood, but that's not important.  The important thing to us today is, how do these guys digest it?  There must be a way that these homewreckers turn hard, fibrous wood into digestible content that sustains them as they burrow deeper and deeper into your St. Louis home.

The process begins with a community of very unique microbes that live in the guts of the termite.  They are truly a community, and every one has a part to play in a complex, multi-step process.  One of the known steps involves using hydrogen to turn carbon dioxide into organic carbon, which is called actogenesis, but it isn't known what microbes do exactly what.  However, California Institute of Technology, (Caltech) has discovered a bacterium, previously unidentified, that lives on the surface of a larger microorganism in this microbe community.  This newly discovered neighbor may be the cause of actogenesis.

"In the termite gut, you have several hundred different species of microbes that live within a millimeter of one another. We know certain microbes are present in the gut, and we know microbes are responsible for certain functions, but until now, we didn't have a good way of knowing which microbes are doing what," says Jared Leadbetter, professor of environmental microbiology at Caltech, where much of the research was performed. He is also an author of a paper about the work published the week of September 16 in the online issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

This important discovery may lead to new ways to combat Termites in your home, as a better understanding of the issues involved in the process of digesting your home may give rise to new ways to treat at-risk wood and building materials, that may be able to repel these home-invading insects at the source, before they can do permanent damage to your home.

For more information on how to remove termites from your St. Louis home, visit www.richardsonpestsolutions.com today and call 314-649-7378 or 636-387-2400 to make an appointment with a St. Louis Pest Control Expert.
Reach the author at info@richardsonpestsolutions.com

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By Chuck Richardson
Many pest control experts can find an entranceway chewed by a rodent.  They chew through wood and drywall easily, and gain access to your St. Louis home via these chewed holes.  However, these aren't the only ways that rodents can get into your home. 

One would think that your home's foundation would be a place that rodents would have a heck of a time accessing.  It's solid concrete (either blocks or bricks) and for Pete's sake, rodents can't chew through that.  However, foundations aren't permanently set in exactly the same place.  They settle, move, and creak and crack.  As the mortar deteriorates, cracks appear between blocks/bricks that rodents are quite adept at sneaking through.  Contractors are also a major contributor to this issue, as they will create huge holes in the foundation to run cables, and often will not patch them, as they don't believe that people will ever see them. 

Any foundation inspection starts with a full walk-around of the building, with careful attention paid to any cracks that may lead to ingress into your home, looking for damage around vents, conduits, and cables that create these breaks.

Some tips to remember:

All pipes and utility lines need to be sealed at choke points to keep rodents from getting past.  These include water lines, cable, phone, and electric. 
Check the crawlspaces and basement vents
Rats will burrow beneath shallow foundations, so look for the telltale burrow marks.  They'll also use this to access via plumbing.
Look for dryer vents and air conditioning vents that may not be sealed properly to the wall.  This is an easy egress point.

For more information and to schedule a free inspection or free estimate, visit www.richardsonpestsolutions.com today and call 314-649-7378 or 636-387-2400 to speak to a St. Louis Pest Control Expert.

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By Chuck Richardson
Raccoons are very smart animals.  They know where to find food, they know where to get into your home, and they can find a way into the hidden spaces in your home, living in your attic and crawlspaces.  This is especially bad during the winter months, when they seek shelter and will nest in your home, tearing up your insulation and walls.  This can also lead to physical problems.

An unfortunate elderly woman in Massachusetts is undergoing rabies shots after a rabid raccoon sauntered into her home, slept on her bed, and attacked her violently.

From NECN:

The raccoon, according to animal control, walked into the home on Hersey Street through a small cat door.

Hingham Animal Control Officer Leslie Badger says the raccoon then, "made it's [sic] way up onto the bed and then curled up and went to sleep."

"It got into bed, and she thought it was her cat and started petting it," said a neighbor who knows the victim well.

At that point, animal control says the raccoon attached itself to the woman's face and started to attack her.

Unfortunately, the woman was scratched and bitten by the raccoon pretty violently, and suffered wounds to her hands and face.  She is recovring at home, and has to undergo the extremely unpleasant series of rabies shots.  The raccoon was euthanized after testing positive for rabies.

This illustrates the danger in having these animals in the house.  If you hear scratching in the attic or other noises that aren't the usual noises of your home, visit www.richardsonpestsolutions.com today and call 314-649-7378 or 636-387-2400 to schedule an appointment with a St. Louis Pest Control Expert.

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By Chuck Richardson
Most people understand the basics about ants.  They live in anthills, they're highly socialized, and they steal your food.  Also, they have been known to ruin a picnic.  However, this information just scratches the surface of the fascinating world of ants. 

Grzegorz Buczkowski, a Purdue University research assistant professor of entomology, has discovered that odorous house ants, the main species that you'll see in your home in St. Louis, have colonies that grow larger and more complex in cities than they do in forests, which is their native habitat.  In a forest, they live in colonies of around 50 with one queen, but they become enormous "supercolonies" in urban areas, with over 6 million workers and up to 50,000 queens. 

"This is a native species that's doing this," said Buczkowski in the journal Biological Invasions. "Native ants are not supposed to become invasive. We don't know of any other native ants that are outcompeting other species of native ants like these."

Odorous house ants tend to live in hollow acorn shells when they are found in forests.  The name odorous comes from the coconut or rum-like smell that emenates from them when they are crushed.

In locations that are a combination of urban and natural, ie a park, Buczkowski said he observed colonies of about 500 workers with a single queen. He believes that it's conceivable that as the ants move closer to urban areas, they will have easier access to food, shelter and other resources. "In the forest, they have to compete for food and nesting sites," Buczkowski said. "In the cities, they don't have that competition. People give them a place to nest, a place to eat."

Buczkowski said understanding why the supercolonies form could lead to better control of the pests in homes, as well as ensuring that they don't outcompete beneficial species.

Future studies on odorous house ants will include studying the ant's genetics and trying to understand the effects of urbanization of odorous house ants.

For more information on how to rid your home of odorous house ants, carpenter ants, and other pests in St. Louis, MO, visit www.richardsonpestsolutions.com today, and call 314-649-7378 or 636-387-2400 to schedule a free inspection and estimate!
Reach the author at info@richardsonpestsolutions.com

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