Profile

Cover photo
Richard Heilbrunn
Worked at Enlightened Society
Attended Daily
Lives in Fishers, Indiana
285,300 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube
Story
Introduction
Shambhala Warrior, ManYana Buddhist Pilgrim , studying in the lineage of Chogyam Trungpa and Sakyong Mipham, Buddhism, Meditation, Mindfulness, Enlightened Socitey
Bragging rights
married, 2 kids, 1 dog, 1 cat
Education
  • Daily
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Work
Occupation
Sitting
Employment
  • Enlightened Society
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Fishers, Indiana
Previously
Salzburg - Detroit - Phoenix - Boulder - Goa

Stream

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
annie bodnar originally shared to buddhism ~ dharma:
 
excellent primer on the teachings of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche
Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche takes us through Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche's comprehensive presentation of the three-yana journey.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The open path is a matter of working purely with what is, of giving up altogether the fear that something may not work, that something may end in failure. One has to give up the paranoia that one might not fit into situations, that one might be rejected. One purely deals with life as it is.

~Chögyam Trungpa
View original post
3
1
Steve Robbiano's profile photo
Add a comment...

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
THE POWERFUL SEED OF GENTLENESS

When we look into ourselves, we tend to fixate on our neurosis, restlessness, and aggression. Or we might fixate on how wonderful, accomplished, and invulnerable we are, but those feelings are usually superficial, covering up our insecurities.Take a look.There is something else, something more than all that.We are willing: willing to wait, willing to smile, willing to be decent. We shouldn’t discount that potential, that powerful seed of gentleness.

— Mindfulness in Action: Making Friends with Yourself through Meditation and Everyday Awareness by Chögyam Trungpa www.shambhala.com/mindfulness-in-action.html
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
MEDITATION: AN INTIMATE RELATIONSHIP

Meditation is one of the main tools we have to develop and practice mindfulness. It is a way to look at ourselves scientifically, so that we can see our psychological situation precisely. Meditation practice is not an exotic or out-of-reach approach. It is immediate and personal, and it involves an intimate relationship with ourselves. We are often critical of ourselves to the point where we may become our own enemies. Meditation is a way of ending that quarrel by making friends with ourselves.

— Mindfulness in Action: Making Friends with Yourself through Meditation and Everyday Awareness by Chögyam Trungpa www.shambhala.com/mindfulness-in-action.html
View original post
5
Add a comment...

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Eating with Awareness

When you eat with awareness, you find that there is more space, more beauty. You begin to watch yourself, to see yourself, and you notice how clumsy you are or how accurate you are. You notice the way you pick up your fork and knife, and the way you put the food in your mouth. When you practice awareness, everything becomes majestic and good. You begin to see that you have been leading a different kind of life in the past. You had the essence of mindfulness already, but you hadn’t discovered it. So when you make an effort to eat mindfully ... you find that life is worth much more than you had expected.

~Chögyam Trungpa
3
Add a comment...

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
One of the great masters of mind training, lojong in Tibetan, said that one of the most marvellous qualities of the mind is that it can always be transformed.

If you understand this then whatever you go through, you don’t take it so solidly. Whatever happens, you’re not stuck blaming others or blaming yourself. You take responsibility because you realize it’s just your mind.

The Buddha said that all fear and anxiety come from a mind that’s untamed. And President Roosevelt said, during the Great Depression, ‘The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.’ Buddha said something even more profound. He said that there is nothing to fear except our own untamed mind.

What we need to do is tame or transform our mind. In fact happiness and suffering are up to us because the mind is the creator of everything. If you transform your mind you will transform your own perceptions and your experience. I have seen this many times in many of my students.

Through meditation, through the practice of loving kindness and compassion, through prayer and devotion, and most importantly through nature of mind, you can transform your mind.
~Sogyal Rinpoche, Sydney, 7 January 2015
2 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
annie bodnar originally shared to buddhism ~ dharma:
 
excellent primer on the teachings of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche
Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche takes us through Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche's comprehensive presentation of the three-yana journey.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Check out the new project from Waylon Lewis of elephantjournal.com fame. Waylon puts forth not only his thoughtful and interesting looking first book, but also the birth of a new opportunity for authors to get their books published, while keeping up to 50% of the profits, as opposed to traditional 10%. Watch the video and read more...
Waylon Lewis is raising funds for Things I would like to do with You: the Book. on Kickstarter! I founded elephantjournal.com. Now I've written my 1st book. Next, let's create an indie book company that pays writers right.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Think of the moment of death as a strange border zone of the mind, a no-man’s land in which, on one hand, if we do not understand the illusory nature of our body, we might suffer vast emotional trauma as we lose it, and on the other we are presented with the possibility of limitless freedom, a freedom that springs precisely from the absence of that very same body.

When we are at last freed from the body that has defined and dominated our understanding of ourselves for so long, the karmic vision of one life is completely exhausted, but any karma that might be created in the future has not yet begun to crystallize.

So what happens in death is that there is a “gap,” or space, that is fertile with vast possibility; it is a moment of tremendous, pregnant power where the only thing that matters, or could matter, is how exactly the mind is. Stripped of a physical body, the mind stands naked, revealed startlingly for what it has always been: the architect of our reality.
View original post
4
1
Donna DeVane's profile photo
Add a comment...

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
DEDICATE THIS EXPERIMENT TO OTHERS

We can begin anything we do—start our day, eat a meal, or walk into a meeting—with the intention to be open, flexible, and kind. Then we can proceed with an inquisitive attitude. As my teacher Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche used to say, “Live your life as an experiment.”

At the end of the activity, whether we feel we have succeeded or failed in our intention, we seal the act by thinking of others, of those who are succeeding and failing all over the world. We wish that anything we learned in our experiment could also benefit them.

—The Places that Scare You by Pema Chödrön www.shambhala.com/books/buddhism/pema-chodron/the-places-that-scare-you-1.html
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
What really matters is not just the practice of sitting but far more the state of mind you find yourself in after meditation. It is this calm and centered state of mind you should prolong through everything you do. I like the Zen story in which the disciple asked his master:

“Master, how do you put enlightenment into action? How do you practice it in everyday life?”
“By eating and by sleeping,” replied the master.
“But Master, everybody sleeps and everybody eats.”
“But not everybody eats when they eat, and not everybody sleeps when they sleep.”

From this comes the famous Zen saying, “When I eat, I eat; when I sleep, I sleep.”

To eat when you eat and sleep when you sleep means to be completely present in all your actions, with none of the distractions of ego to stop you from being there. This is integration.
View original post
4
Add a comment...

Richard Heilbrunn

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Sometimes I tease people and ask: “What makes you so adamant that there’s no life after death? What proof do you have? What if you found there was a life after this one, having died denying its existence?”

Those of us who undertake a spiritual discipline—of meditation, for example—come to discover many things about our own minds that we did not know before. For as our minds open more and more to the extraordinary, vast, and hitherto unsuspected existence of the nature of mind, we begin to glimpse a completely different dimension, one in which all of our assumptions about our identity and reality, which we thought we knew so well, start to dissolve, and in which the possibility of lives other than this one becomes at least likely. We begin to understand that everything we are being told by the masters about life and death, and life after death, is real.
View original post
3
Add a comment...