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Richard Heilbrunn
Worked at Enlightened Society
Attended Daily
Lives in Fishers, Indiana
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Richard Heilbrunn

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Richard Heilbrunn

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How hard it can be to turn our attention within! How easily we allow our old habits and set patterns to dominate us! Even though they bring us suffering, we accept them with almost fatalistic resignation, for we are so used to giving in to them. We may idealize freedom, but when it comes to our habits, we are completely enslaved.

Still, reflection can slowly bring us wisdom. We may, of course, fall back into fixed repetitive patterns again and again, but slowly we can emerge from them and change.
—Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, chapter 3
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Richard Heilbrunn

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THE TEACHER CREATES THE SITUATION

In terms of transmission, in order to avoid charging up the ego, it is necessary to ask some external person to give you something, so that you feel that something is given to you. Then you don’t regard it as your wealth, which he or she is giving back to you, but as something very precious of his or hers. So one must also be very grateful to the teacher. That is a great protection against the ego, since you do not look on the awakened state as something discovered within yourself, but as something which someone else has given you. In reality, the transmission is simply discovered within oneself. All the teacher can do is to create the situation.

—Meditation in Action by Chögyam Trungpa http://www.shambhala.com/meditation-in-action-3.html
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Richard Heilbrunn

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Nothing has any inherent existence of its own when you really look at it, and this absence of independent existence is what we call “emptiness.” Think of a tree. When you think of a tree, you tend to think of a distinctly defined object; and on a certain level it is. But when you look more closely at the tree, you will see that ultimately it has no independent existence.

When you contemplate it, you will find that it dissolves into an extremely subtle net of relationships that stretches across the universe. The rain that falls on its leaves, the wind that sways it, the soil that nourishes and sustains it, all the seasons and the weather, moonlight and starlight and sunlight—all form part of this tree.

As you begin to think more and more about the tree, you will discover that everything in the universe helps to make the tree what it is; that it cannot at any moment be isolated from anything else; and that at every moment its nature is subtly changing. This is what we mean when we say things are empty, that they have no independent existence.
—Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, chapter 3
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+Richard Heilbrunn , That is it !! The air that comes in to nourish me is being given and shared by my loving plants ! My air is taken by these loving plants ! We are so closely related that if we destroy one , the other will be destroyed too ! Same goes with all the other elements , be it water , sunlight and more ! Thank you for your wonderful post . 
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The source of the effort to confirm our solidity is an uncertainty as to whether or not we exist ~~~ Chögyam Trungpa #trungpa 
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Absolutely. One cannot deny that all of our common experiences are through the vantage point of the mixture of form, feelings, perceptions, mental formations, and consciousness. Using mental formations in a way that breeds more confusion is unskillful, whereas Using the unarguable process to remove confusion is skillful. The path as a reference point is skillful in bringing one to the subtlest state, where one can then let go of states altogether.
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In Tibetan, the word for “body” is lü, which means “something you leave behind,” like baggage. Each time we say lü, it reminds us that we are only travellers, taking temporary refuge in this life and this body. In Tibet, people did not distract themselves by spending all their time trying to make their external circumstances more comfortable. They were satisfied if they had enough to eat, clothes on their backs, and a roof over their heads.

Going on, as we do, obsessively trying to improve our conditions, can become an end in itself, and a pointless distraction. Would people in their right mind think of fastidiously redecorating their hotel room every time they checked in to one?
—Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, chapter 2
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Richard Heilbrunn

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The Buddhist meditation masters know how flexible and workable the mind is. If we train it, anything is possible. In fact, we are already perfectly trained by and for samsara, trained to get jealous, trained to grasp, trained to be anxious and sad and desperate and greedy, trained to react angrily to whatever provokes us. In fact, we are trained to such an extent that these negative emotions rise spontaneously, without our even trying to generate them.

So everything is a question of training and the power of habit. Devote the mind to confusion and we know only too well, if we’re honest, that it will become a dark master of confusion, adept in its addictions, subtle and perversely supple in its slaveries. Devote it in meditation to the task of freeing itself from illusion, and we will find that with time, patience, discipline, and the right training, the mind will begin to unknot itself and know its essential bliss and clarity.
—Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, chapter 5
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Perfectly timed post, +Richard Heilbrunn.  Thanks for sharing.
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Richard Heilbrunn

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Despite all our chatter about being practical, to be practical in the West means to be ignorantly, and often selfishly, short-sighted. Our myopic focus on this life, and this life only, is the great deception, the source of the modern world’s bleak and destructive materialism. No one talks about death and no one talks about the afterlife, because people are made to believe that such talk will only thwart our so-called progress in the world.

If our deepest desire is truly to live and go on living, why do we blindly insist that death is the end? Why not at least try to explore the possibility that there may be a life after? Why, if we are as pragmatic as we claim, don’t we begin to ask ourselves seriously: Where does our real future lie? After all, very few of us live longer than a hundred years. And after that there stretches the whole of eternity, unaccounted for. . . .
—Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, chapter 2
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You are focused on the single most critical question for people today. Why are we here, if this life is all there is? Materialism blinds true sight into what's important; it turns out the light to other possibilities; and, it puts self ahead of love for others. Pride in place of wisdom turns out the light. Without light we can't see. 
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Richard Heilbrunn

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When we see other’s good qualities, devoid of inner discomfort, bliss smiles in our heart. This is the profundity of sympathetic joy. ~~~ Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche http://goo.gl/2KcK7D
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Just as the ocean has waves, and the sun has rays, so the mind’s own radiance is its thoughts and emotions. The ocean has waves, yet the ocean is not particularly disturbed by them. The waves are the very nature of the ocean. Waves will rise, but where do they go? Back into the ocean. And where do the waves come from? The ocean.

In the same manner, thoughts and emotions are the radiance and expression of the very nature of the mind. They rise from the mind, but where do they dissolve? Back into the mind. Whatever rises, do not see it as a particular problem. If you do not impulsively react, if you are only patient, it will once again settle into its essential nature.

When you have this understanding, then rising thoughts only enhance your practice. But when you do not understand what they intrinsically are—the radiance of the nature of your mind—then your thoughts become the seed of confusion. So have a spacious, open, and compassionate attitude toward your thoughts and emotions, because in fact your thoughts are your family, the family of your mind. Before them, as Dudjom Rinpoche used to say: “Be like an old wise man, watching a child play.”
—Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, chapter 5
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Story
Introduction
Shambhala Warrior, ManYana Buddhist Pilgrim , studying in the lineage of Chogyam Trungpa and Sakyong Mipham, Buddhism, Meditation, Mindfulness, Enlightened Socitey
Bragging rights
married, 2 kids, 1 dog, 1 cat
Education
  • Daily
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Work
Occupation
Sitting
Employment
  • Enlightened Society
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Fishers, Indiana
Previously
Salzburg - Detroit - Phoenix - Boulder - Goa