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Richard Gadsden
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Richard Gadsden

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So nice to see Ashley win one after the way she got creamed by Scags and Felicia Day on the Resistance episode.
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Richard Gadsden

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For +Mick Fealty in particular

Interesting article on Protestants learning Irish in East Belfast

http://m.aljazeera.com/story/2014423132641709630
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That's Linda, widow of David Ervine... and an example of real cultural leadership on the ground...
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See if you can beat my time of: 45:11 #DrWhoDoodle
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Richard Gadsden

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Eric Idle...
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I don't like the title of this.

It's not a religion, it's science.

I prefer the ringing words of the last paragraph:

"Science is that narrow realm of knowledge that, in principle, is universally accepted. I embarked on this analysis to answer questions that, to my mind, had not been answered. I hope that the Berkeley Earth analysis will help settle the scientific debate regarding global warming and its human causes."

I assume there is a paper headed for peer-review, and hope that these results turn out to have been accurately represented in the newspaper article.
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LOL
In 2008 on this day smooth-talking Captain Willard ("Mitt") Romney performed the final duty of his "twenty" by organizing the security detail for the Republican Presidential Debate on the Moon. With the population of the base approaching the magic thirty thousand target required for a consideration of Statehood, the Lunar Primary had initially focused on the political issue of recognition. But the financial crisis had forced an explosive new item...
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Richard Gadsden

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Tim O'Reilly originally shared:
 
Before Solving a Problem, Make Sure You've Got the Right Problem

I was pleased to see the measured tone of the White House response to the citizen petition about #SOPA and #PIPA

https://wwws.whitehouse.gov/petitions#/!/response/combating-online-piracy-while-protecting-open-and-innovative-internet

and yet I found myself profoundly disturbed by something that seems to me to go to the root of the problem in Washington: the failure to correctly diagnose the problem we are trying to solve, but instead to accept, seemingly uncritically, the claims of various interest groups. The offending paragraph is as follows:

"Let us be clear—online piracy is a real problem that harms the American economy, and threatens jobs for significant numbers of middle class workers and hurts some of our nation's most creative and innovative companies and entrepreneurs. It harms everyone from struggling artists to production crews, and from startup social media companies to large movie studios. While we are strongly committed to the vigorous enforcement of intellectual property rights, existing tools are not strong enough to root out the worst online pirates beyond our borders."

In the entire discussion, I've seen no discussion of credible evidence of this economic harm. There's no question in my mind that piracy exists, that people around the world are enjoying creative content without paying for it, and even that some criminals are profiting by redistributing it. But is there actual economic harm?

In my experience at O'Reilly, the losses due to piracy are far outweighed by the benefits of the free flow of information, which makes the world richer, and develops new markets for legitimate content. Most of the people who are downloading unauthorized copies of O'Reilly books would never have paid us for them anyway; meanwhile, hundreds of thousands of others are buying content from us, many of them in countries that we were never able to do business with when our products were not available in digital form.

History shows us, again and again, that frontiers are lawless places, but that as they get richer and more settled, they join in the rule of law. American publishing, now the largest publishing industry in the world, began with piracy. (I have a post coming on that subject on Monday.)

Congress (and the White House) need to spend time thinking hard about how best to grow our economy - and that means being careful not to close off the frontier, or to harm those trying to settle it, in order to protect those who want to remain safe at home. British publishers could have come to America in the 19th century; they chose not to, and as a result, we grew our own indigenous publishing industry, which relied at first, in no small part, on pirating British and European works.

If the goal is really to support jobs and the American economy, internet "protectionism" is not the way to do it.

It is said (though I've not found the source) that Einstein once remarked that if given 60 minutes to save the world, he would spend 55 of them defining the problem. And defining the problem means collecting and studying real evidence, not the overblown claims of an industry that has fought the introduction of every new technology that has turned out, in the end, to grow their business rather than threaten it.

P.S. If Congress and the White House really want to fight pirates who are hurting the economy, they should be working to rein in patent trolls. There, the evidence of economic harm is clear, in multi-billion dollar transfers of wealth from companies building real products to those who have learned how to work the patent system while producing no value for consumers.

P. P.S. See also my previous piece on the subject of doing an independent investigation of the facts rather than just listening to the appeals of lobbyists, https://plus.google.com/107033731246200681024/posts/5Xd3VjFR8gx
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Richard Gadsden

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I believe there are outdoor escalators in Hong Kong.
This evening, we took a little walk up Castle Steps, towards the Moorish Castle Estate as we had seen a tower with a clock from the Morrison’s carpark last week. We wondered what it was, and where, so off we went investigatin...
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Richard Gadsden

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You want a 20c coin too.  Four coins.
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A thought about HTTPS.  What about a browser extension that marks all cookies as SSL-only (by default, with an exceptions list)?  You wouldn't be able to log in to any website that didn't implement an HTTPS-only version of the site, unless it's on the exceptions list.

You'd still be able to visit sites that don't require authentication, but you'd be permanently anonymous when they're not doing HTTPS.
As the year draws to a close, EFF is looking back at the major trends influencing digital rights in 2012 and discussing where we are in the fight for free expression, innovation, fair use, and privacy...
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Richard Gadsden

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Can I vote for this guy, please?
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Drug warriors often contend that drug use would skyrocket if we were to legalize or decriminalize drugs in the United States. Fortunately, we have a real-world example of the actual effects of ending ...
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Have him in circles
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po8crg
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Geeky Lib Dem, works in Manchester
Anything I say is my opinion.  Everyone else can have their own.
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Stood for Parliament for a real political party.