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Richard DeVaul
Works at Google
Attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Lives in Menlo Park, CA 94025
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Richard DeVaul

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Wow.  Once again confirming that our idealized representations of digital machines do not correspond to physical reality... some times in really interesting and dangerous ways.  Given the complexity and density of modern semiconductor devices it's quite likely that there are many variations of this "non-ideal machine" exploit waiting to be found... and it is possible that in some cases they may even be deliberately introduced vulnerabilities.  
 
"“Rowhammer” is a problem with some recent DRAM devices in which repeatedly accessing a row of memory can cause bit flips in adjacent rows. We tested a selection of laptops and found that a subset of them exhibited the problem. We built two working privilege escalation exploits that use this effect. One exploit uses rowhammer-induced bit flips to gain kernel privileges on x86-64 Linux when run as an unprivileged userland process. When run on a machine vulnerable to the rowhammer problem, the process was able to induce bit flips in page table entries (PTEs). It was able to use this to gain write access to its own page table, and hence gain read-write access to all of physical memory."
Posted by Mark Seaborn, sandbox builder and breaker, with contributions by Thomas Dullien, reverse engineer [This guest post continues Project Zero’s practice of promoting excellence in security research on the Project Zero b...
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Hmm... Sounds like most ECC isn't enough. Yikes.
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Very well said by a true pioneer in the field.
 
Who would pay US$3995 ($8,986 today) to own a early prototype of a consumer device that could only be used for 30 minutes?  I don't know, but someone did this week, March 1984, 31 years ago.    Seems ludicrous, except that  the device was the Motorola DynaTAC 8000X, the first commercially available cellular phone.  That day, some unknown consumer started living in the future, as today there are billions of users.

The wearable computing devices we see today are making similar history.  Some are already wildly successful - even if they are going unremarked.  The LG Tone Pro-style around-the-neck bluetooth stereo headphones are on several best seller lists on Amazon, and I rarely walk around in public without seeing a pair.  Other, more experimental devices like Google Glass have shown that the public "gets it," even if the price tag is more like that of the $9000 DynaTAC than the Diamond Rio (the first commercially successful wearable MP3 player, sold at $291 in today's money).   With numerous technological pieces finally falling into place to make wearables feasible for business and consumers (not the least of which, widespread deployment of low power Bluetooth and low latency cellular networks), I expect to see a wave of products, some of which will really change our lives in the next decade.

As many of you know, this journey has been very personal for me and various teams of enthusiasts.   This year is the 25th since I started trying to make a wearable computer that I could use in my everyday life - for note taking, augmented memory, music, navigation, messaging, health/fitness, augmented reality, social collectives, and basically everything people do on a laptop or smart phone these days.  During that time, two thoughts have really inspired me:

1) "Time makes more converts than reason."  Thomas Paine

and

2) The best way to invent the future is to live in it (with nods to Alan Kay, Abraham Lincoln, and my colleague Gregory Abowd)

Here's to hoping that soon more people will be inventing the future with us by wearing it.
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This is really incredible. Think about the complexity required at the gate level to do the controls for this automaton were it done with digital logic and DACs. And yet, 11 strings and seven cams are all that are required. Amazing.
 
approximately 200 years ago Hisasige Tanaka, the first president of Toshiba,  built this awesome automata! It uses cams with strings to fire actual tiny arrows - the video is 8 minutes and includes computer animation of its inner workings.

(the important bits have English subtitles)
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Stunning!  The grasping, notching, and releasing of the arrow is pretty unbelievable.  I would not have thought that would work!
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Yesterday Dana and I tried snowskating for the first time. This is my very first time stepping on to a snowskate, as captured on video by Dana.

Snowskating is skateboarding on snow, with a monoski on trucks instead of wheels. It has all of the challenges of snowboarding with all of the challenges of skateboarding. It is hard, but lots of fun.

I have a lot of video of Dana captured through Glass that I will be sharing shortly. 
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OK, G+ community.   I need your help.

Complicated holiday cooking is coming up.   I'm looking for an android or iOS app that will help me keep track of multiple parallel timed processes, ideally using voice control as I will likely have hands full with cooking stuff.  Imagine I've got a bird roasting, eggs poaching, veggies steaming, and bread baking.  I want help to know when to check in on each of these.  Also, I want to be able to use this app to record how long things actually take so I know better in the future.  

Requirements:  I should be able to set multiple named timers, easily add increments of time to a specific timer if things aren't done, and stop timers early.   I should have the ability to do this through interactive voice command or through touch, or some combination thereof.   The app should remember how long things take.   If I start a "bake pizza 450" timer and initially set it for 10 minutes but it actually takes 8 minutes (I stop the timer early) or 15 minutes (I add five and let the time expire) it should record that result.  And when I start a new "steam broccoli" timer it should use the last n times I've done the steam broccoli process to suggest a default timer duration, and the variance on those times to suggest a good early time for me to check in before the steam broccoli timer expires.

Any suggestions?  And yes,  I could write this myself but I don't really want to spend the cycles to do it if there is something good already out there.
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Sand timer on android, if you're willing to keep a note elsewhere about which color is what thing. It's got nine.

Simple Timer claims to do it but I haven't used it.
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A nice article about the future of skateboarding as transportation, featuring my Google [x] colleague +Colin Sebern.  It's also a great discussion of the history of skateboarding in San Francisco.
Standing 6 feet, 6 inches tall, with a barrel chest and legs like tree trunks, Colin Sebern almost exceeds the size limit for his electric...
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Richard DeVaul

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Proud to be a sponsor of Borderlands Books, in the SF Mission district on Valencia.  Borderlands recently announced they were going to close, but the community stepped up and they are staying in business as the unique community resource of independent SF bookstore/cafe that they are.  
Kim Abreu 542. Arienne Adamcikova 655. Jonathan William Adams 132. John Joseph Adams 515. Cassie Alexander 545. Jonathan Alloy 143. Erik Alm 273. Zac Appleton 235. Nabil Arnaoot 647. Matthew Arning 409. Ben Arrington 334. Kris Ashley 267. Joel Aufrect 644. Fredrika Baer 330. Sean Baeza 216 ...
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Ais does great stuff.  I have one of her drawings on my desk right now.  Check out the Borderlands show if you get the chance.  Full disclosure:  Ais is a close friend and also a very talented artist.  
 
Borderlands Show
Still life with windex and picture. Because I'm hanging my show tomorrow! At Borderlands Cafe next to the famous science fiction and fantasy bookstore of the same name! My house is a giant mess! So many art! Show will be there for a bit under a month!  Bord...
Still life with windex and picture. Because I'm hanging my show tomorrow! At Borderlands Cafe next to the famous science fiction and fantasy bookstore of the same name! My house is a giant mess! So many art! Show will be th...
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Richard DeVaul

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Heh.  I remember proposing our original 100 day duration target, saying something like "100 days is conservative given our expected gas diffusion rate.  Once we reliably get to 100 days, 150 or even 200 should be no problem."  That was before I grew to appreciate how hard long-duration stratospheric ballooning was, but it's nice to see the (naive) prophecy coming true.  Great work, Loon team.  :)
 
After a record-breaking 187 days aloft, we have recently landed the Project’s longest duration balloon in one of our Argentinian recovery zones.

That’s a long time! Enough time to hard-boil 33,660 eggs, or 134,640 if you like your yolk runny (doesn’t include eating time), or listen to Elton John’s “Rocket Man” just over 61,000 times. In the same time it took the Earth to complete half of its annual orbit of the sun, our record-breaker managed to circumnavigate the globe 9 times, enduring temperatures as low as -75c (-103 F) and wind speeds as high as 291 km/h, soaring to a maximum height of 21km and drifting over more than a dozen countries across 4 continents.

Having been in the air for just over 3 months we decided to put the balloon through its paces, making a series of altitude changes on its last circumnavigation to test our ability to fly north out of southern latitude bands. The test was successful and we managed to turn up to the Northern tip of Australia where we were able to access a much slower wind stream going in the opposite direction and sending our balloon lazily back over to South America. Finally, we brought it back into its original southern latitude band to swoop in and land in one of our Argentinian recovery zones for collection.

Recovery operations are now underway to bring the balloon back to the lab so the team can analyze this magnificent specimen and learn as much as possible about what makes such long durations possible, building these learnings into our future long-duration fleets before putting the record-breaker through our recycling process. We think that this balloon has definitely earned its retirement!
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By way of my old friend +Arun Sannuti, a reminder of a lost era in computer science and engineering.  It wasn't all guys -- in fact many of the most important pioneers in computing were women, from Ada Lovelace to Grace Hopper.   You can find more about Margaret Hamilton on her wikipedia page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Hamilton_%28scientist%29 
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Awesome.  In many ways Orion is very retro -- a sort of Space Shuttle/Apollo hybrid that combines the best, most conservative features of both designs.  However, if you are going to ride a rocket to orbit and beyond, conservative design is not a bad thing. Congratulations, Orion team!
 
The Orion crew module splashed down in the Pacific Ocean approximately 600 miles southwest of San Diego at 11:29 a.m. EST. Flight controllers have reported that the spacecraft is in a stable configuration. The recovery team from NASA, the U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin will perform initial recovery operations, including safing the crew module and towing it into the well deck of the USS Anchorage ahead of its return to U.S. Naval Base, San Diego and then on to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Orion launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida this morning at 7:05 a.m. EST.

The uncrewed flight tested many of the riskiest events Orion will see when it carries astronauts and provided critical data to improve the spacecraft’s design and reduce risks to its future crews. Orion orbited the Earth twice, reaching a peak altitude of 3,604 miles during its trip. Orion’s flight test is a critical step on NASA's Journey to Mars.

Image credit: NASA
#Orion #OrionLaunch #NASA_Orion #NASA #Space #JourneyToMars
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Education
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Media Arts and Sciences Ph.D., 1999 - 2004
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Media Arts & Sciences M.S., 1997 - 1999
  • Texas A&M University
    Architecture B.E.D., 1989 - 1994
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
mad science! romance! poorly chosen taglines!
Introduction
Hi.  I'm the Rich DeVaul who does innovation leadership at Google [x].  I've also worked for Apple, co-founded a tech startup called AWare and did wearables stuff as part of my Ph.D. work at MIT in the late '90s and early '00s.  I'm a Black Rock Ranger, a serious amateur cellist, and some-time fire performer. I ride skateboards a lot, surf and snowboard, and climb rocks and ice when the opportunities present themselves. 

If you are looking for someone of the same name that does psychiatry and medicine you are probably looking for my dad.
Bragging rights
Leader of the Google [x] Rapid Evaluation Team,, Founder and chief technical architect, Google [x] Project Loon, Black Rock City Ranger and Sandman lead
Work
Occupation
Engineer, Scientist, Innovation Professional.
Employment
  • Google
    Rapid Evaluation Team Leader, Chief Technical Architect of Project Loon, present
    Special projects development, Google [x]
  • Apple
    Senior Prototype Scientist, 2010 - 2011
  • AWare Technologies
    CTO, 2004 - 2010
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Menlo Park, CA 94025
Previously
Mountain View, CA 94041 - Somerville, MA - College Station, TX - Ames, IA - Morgantown, WV - Houston, TX - Baltamore, MD
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