Profile

Cover photo
Restoring The Landscape With Native Plants
204 followers|34,263 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

 
My latest Houzz article profiles leafcutter bees:
With approximately 4,000 bee species in North America, the opportunities for observing bees in the garden are endless. Leafcutter bees (Megachile) are charismatic bees and commonly appear in urban and suburban gardens. Their antics will likely brighten your day: Females often scoot across flowers laden with pollen, collecting it on their undersides as their abdomens turn bright orange or yellow, depending on the pollen from the flower they just v...
1
Add a comment...
 
My article this month at Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens:
We often base our model on how bees nest, forage, and communicate on the honey bee. Honey bees nest in large, social colonies whereas most native bees have solitary nests, and the majority of nativ...
1
1
Ron Taylor's profile photo
 
Very imformative article about ground nests 
Add a comment...
 
Cleaning up our gardens too soon and removing all the plant debris and leaves can have a detrimental effect on beneficial insect populations over winter. When habitat and food for beneficial insects are not supplied in our gardens and landscapes, pest populations such as aphids, mealybugs, whiteflies and psyllids can get out of control. By leaving fallen leaves in the perennial garden and perennial plant growth from a given growing season in plac...
2
Add a comment...
 
My latest Houzz article profiles American bladdernut, Staphylea trifolia:
The delicate branches of American bladdernut (Staphylea trifolia) are covered with clusters of nodding white flowers in spring. This underutilized, shade-tolerant, native shrub (small tree) is ideal for woodland understories, shade gardens and foundation plantings. Flowering before most dogwood (Cornus spp) and Viburnum spp, this shrub also fills an important niche in the spring, providing forage for pollinators just emerging from their nests or...
1
Add a comment...
 
Oodles of bright blossoms and an easygoing nature make this woodland plant a welcome addition to a shady garden
1
Add a comment...
 
This week, June 16-22, 2014 is National Pollinator Week. Pollinator Week was initiated and is managed by the Pollinator Partnership. From the Pollinator Partnership website: "Seven years ago the U....
1
4
HostasDirect, Inc.'s profile photoIDeal Garden Markers's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
204 people
Flowers coloring's profile photo
Kevin Campbell's profile photo
Oslo Hudlege's profile photo
Wendy Campbell's profile photo
Matt Townsend's profile photo
台灣花蓮觀光資訊網站's profile photo
Ecosystem Gardening for Wildlife's profile photo
Keri Palma's profile photo
Mary Scanlon's profile photo
 
For Houzz last month, I wrote about small carpenter bees and how you can provide nesting sites for them in your landscape:
Unlike domesticated, managed honey bees that nest in human-made hives, most wild bees are solitary (they don’t nest in a colony) and need appropriate nesting sites in our gardens and landscapes. The majority of wild bees nest in the ground; the minority are cavity nesters. Attracting ground-nesting bees to your garden can be difficult, but attracting small carpenter bees is quite easy, because they nest in plant stems. Small carpenter bees get th...
1
Add a comment...
 
Cuckoo bees are named after the European cuckoo bird that lays its eggs in the nests of other birds. A North American example would be the brown-headed cowbird that lays its eggs in the nests of ot...
1
Add a comment...
 
Learn about this interesting wasp that hunts flies:
There are endless opportunities to discover something new in your wildlife garden or local park. Remember to take the time to sit quietly and observe what's going on around you. More often than not...
1
Add a comment...
 
Beneficial Insect Profile - Lacewings
Brown lacewing larva As the last remaining leaves fall from the trees, I start to think about all the beneficial insects that are seeking shelter under the leaf litter or attached to plant stems for the winter. With leaf blowers dominating the suburban land...
2
Add a comment...
 
#nativeplants   
Wild lupine puts on an outstanding, colorful display from May to June in the northern U.S. states (earlier in the southern ones). It also fills an important void left after the first wildflowers finish blooming in the woods and before the prairies and meadows come alive in midsummer. Look for large female bees visiting the flowers for pollen; the pollen that they collect is combined with nectar from other flowers and stored in their nests to feed...
2
Add a comment...
 
Ground-Nesting Bee Profile ~ Unequal Cellophane Bee, Colletes inaequalis
The Unequal Cellophane Bee is typically the earliest Colletes species to emerge in the spring in our area. This spring, I found several aggregations of nests on south-facing slopes at a local park. Females began excavating nests as early as the third week o...
1
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
204 people
Flowers coloring's profile photo
Kevin Campbell's profile photo
Oslo Hudlege's profile photo
Wendy Campbell's profile photo
Matt Townsend's profile photo
台灣花蓮觀光資訊網站's profile photo
Ecosystem Gardening for Wildlife's profile photo
Keri Palma's profile photo
Mary Scanlon's profile photo
Story
Tagline
Landscape Restoration | Native Plants | Wildlife | Photography |
Introduction
Official Google+ page for the Restoring The Landscape With Native Plants blog, www.RestoringTheLandscape.com