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Reihan Salam
Works at National Review
Attended P.S. 160
Lives in Brooklyn, NY
2,536 followers|16,878 views
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Reihan Salam

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It's happening. It's really, really happening. This logo is courtesy of +Rosten Woo.
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Nice
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Reihan Salam

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Highways, fireplaces, and Christmas trees.
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Hmm. Sounds like Iron & Wine, Will Oldham and Swedish Depression Pop in a blender. I like it.
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This is very interesting.
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I always wonder about your reading list because you seem to pull up a large variety of good stuff.
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As Jared Diamond points out in Guns Germs and Steel (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0393061310/), humans caused ecological damage, particularly large animal extinctions, long before the Mesopotamian agriculture revolution. GGS also claims that human agricultural productivity were contributing factors to the decline of arrable land in areas where farming has existed the longest. The great cedar forests of Syria, the hanging gardens of Babylon, even the Fertile Crescent itself; Diamond gives as examples of societies over-leveraging their natural habitats' ability to support large populations and a society's inability to comprehend when such an over extension has taken place. A point that he explores further in the even better book Collapse (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0143117009/). Both are excellent books. Full of conjecture, to be sure, but great reading and backed up by interesting archaeological analysis of what our ancestors left behind.

Thank you for sharing.
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Reihan Salam

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My latest column is an optimistic interpretation of the debt deal.
Op-Ed: Tea party turnaround. Debt deal marks landmark shift from the welfare state as usual. By Reihan Salam Tuesday, August 2, 2011. From a distance, the story of modern American conservatism looks l...
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Justin, of course I don't mean to come after you personally; and from your further explanation in that post I think we agree more than was apparent earlier. Your point about NGDP is well taken; but as I usually think to myself when I'm reading similar arguments by Scott Sumner, I think it's too strong of an assumption to say that the central bank is controlling NGDP just because it could. Like him, you're right to say that the bank could manage the problem if it wanted to; but my rejoinder is - it isn't. Which means that under these conditions, fiscal policy is not neutral. The Fed, as far as I can tell, is only targeting nominal interest rates, not NGDP; which means that fiscal policy can and should be effective in going the rest of the way to target. And from your position on spending cuts I think you agree.

With repect to entitlements, I think the problem is much less serious. Social Security is relatively on target and could be balanced with modest adjustments, such as the removal of the payroll tax cap or mild means-testing (not necessarily the best options, but just to illustrate the range of possibilities). Medicare/Medicaid is the main driver of spending growth, and that's mostly due to uncontrolled costs in the greater medical sector - not poor budgeting. I would support the forced saving model (in the Singaporean style) if health insurance was taken out of the picture, since I think that system hides and distorts costs quite badly; however, given that we have an insurance culture already, I think a more feasible path would be the expansion of Medicare to all citizens. The premiums of the young would be sufficient to cover the costs of the elderly; it's my belief that lowering the Medicare eligibility age would, at all points, improve the solvency of the system. In addition, greater bargaining power would help control the growth of underlying costs.
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Reihan Salam

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Op-Ed: Don't call it racism. The left's labeling of conservatives as biased is flat-out wrong. By Reihan Salam Friday, August 19, 2011. The other day, Ed Schultz, host of MSNBC's “The Ed S...
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David: on the culture element, I agree. There are lots of attractive things about the past, but also a great many of those advantages were restricted to white males. We have to develop a new social structure to account to for the inclusion of women and minorities. Nostalgia in this sense is culpably-racist to the degree that it identifies specifically with the white-maleness of the time, and it is non-culpably-racist to the degree it identifies with social institutions that were a byproduct of that white-maleness.

Also, on free trade: Krugman (http://goo.gl/xGNNv) specifically links to Rodrik (http://goo.gl/zsP1E), who says:

"In particular, since scale economies are not compatible with perfect competition, we find ourselves in a second-best world with all kinds of strange possibilities. Opening up to trade can leave some countries worse off, and in general trade-distorting policies like tariffs and subsidies can make individual countries better off. So be careful how you describe the world we live in..."

Same lesson - free trade is generally good, but often specifically bad, and this is understood by top trade theorists like Krugman. Read the Keynes piece I linked to earlier for more, if you haven't already.
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I could try. Learning the theremin at the moment. 
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(Via John M.)
In 1961 the US pledged to send man to the moon. In 2010 the Constellation Program, meant to return man to the moon, was ended. This is the aftermath.
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Entirely plausible. It wouldn't be the first time.
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"Conservatives also tend to think that loosening monetary policy is a kind of intervention in free markets, and therefore to be suspicious of it. But this is an error. Professor Hendrickson points out that in a system of free banking, with competitive note issue rather than a central bank, the desire for profit and the need for solvency would lead to the supply of banknotes roughly equaling the demand. In a fiat-money regime such as the one under which we, for better or worse, live, a central bank’s withholding of a sufficient supply of money is just as much of an intervention in the economy as its overproduction of it." -- Ramesh Ponnuru
April 6, 2011 4:00 AM. Not Enough Money From the Apr. 4, 2011, issue of NR. 'To economists reading this essay in 2010, perhaps the most remarkable single fact to note about monetary policy at the ...
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It's not just conservatives, though. Everyone thinks that, more or less. Sometimes I wonder if the reason so many people like the gold standard is that it was relatively easy to understand.
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Oh, I've been waiting for this alright.
Josh Levin originally shared:
 
The day you haven't been waiting for, but might have considered maybe, possibly waiting for if you knew it was coming: Day 1 of my "Big Man, Little Countries" travel series on Slate. Today: Andorra. Tomorrow through Friday: Monaco, San Marino, Liechtenstein ... and still more Liechtenstein!
PRINTDISCUSSE-MAILRSSRECOMMEND...REPRINTSSINGLE PAGE. FacebookDiggRedditStumbleUponCLOSE. When we think of a place like Andorra, if we big-country folk think of it at all, all that comes to mind is it...
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I'm horribly biased, having lived there and loved it, but I am sad to not see Luxembourg on the list. I suppose it just isn't small enough.

Cool project, though!
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Thanks to Dan Foster for sending me this gem of a photograph.
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Have him in circles
2,536 people
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Joseph D'Angelo's profile photo
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Work
Occupation
Cultural Worker
Employment
  • National Review
    present
  • Reihan Salam
    Sole Proprietor, present
  • R Street Institute
    Fellow
  • Economics 21
  • The New Republic
  • The Council on Foreign Relations
  • The New York Times
  • NBC News
  • The Atlantic
  • The New America Foundation
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Brooklyn, NY
Previously
New York, NY - Ithaca, New York - Cambridge, Massachusetts - Washington, DC
Story
Introduction
I'm really hoping Google will open the social graph. Also: I like to read. 
Education
  • P.S. 160
  • P.S. 179
  • I.S. 201
  • Stuyvesant High School
  • Telluride Association Summer Program
  • Cornell University
  • Harvard University
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Pritu