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Rebecca Seitz
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We're excited to start discussions with the Phoenix area to bring Google Fiber there. Share this graphic to let your neighbors know the news. Learn more and sign up for updates: http://goo.gl/AqL6me
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Comet ISON Outburst: Taken on Friday Nov. 15
Copyright: Damian Peach
http://www.damianpeach.com/ison.htm
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The Fairy of Eagle Nebula
Image Credit: The Hubble Heritage Team, (STScI/AURA), +European Space Agency, ESA, +NASA
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130929.html

The dust sculptures of the Eagle Nebula are evaporating. As powerful starlight whittles away these cool cosmic mountains, the statuesque pillars that remain might be imagined as mythical beasts. Pictured above is one of several striking dust pillars of the Eagle Nebula that might be described as a gigantic alien fairy. This fairy, however, is ten light years tall and spews radiation much hotter than common fire. The greater Eagle Nebula, M16, is actually a giant evaporating shell of gas and dust inside of which is a growing cavity filled with a spectacular stellar nursery currently forming an open cluster of stars. The above image in scientifically re-assigned colors was released in 2005 as part of the fifteenth anniversary celebration of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope.
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Today is a big travel day - leaving the Arizona to come back home to New Zealand.  This is third trans-pacific flight in one week!  

Here's a photo from yesterday of the amazing pool that has ever-changing-colors under the water at the +Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North  -- that place rocks!
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M2-9: Wings of a Butterfly Nebula
Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, +NASA, +European Space Agency, ESA - Processing: Judy Schmidt
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130915.html

Are stars better appreciated for their art after they die? Actually, stars usually create their most artistic displays as they die. In the case of low-mass stars like our Sun and M2-9 pictured above, the stars transform themselves from normal stars to white dwarfs by casting off their outer gaseous envelopes. The expended gas frequently forms an impressive display called a planetary nebula that fades gradually over thousand of years. M2-9, a butterfly planetary nebula 2100 light-years away shown in representative colors, has wings that tell a strange but incomplete tale. In the center, two stars orbit inside a gaseous disk 10 times the orbit of Pluto. The expelled envelope of the dying star breaks out from the disk creating the bipolar appearance. Much remains unknown about the physical processes that cause planetary nebulae.
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I don't generally subscribe to fortune cookies, but I got one tonight that essentially sums up my entire approach to life. It was kinda eerie.
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