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Realm of History
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The future lies in the past
The future lies in the past

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Also known as Quetzalcoatl, Kukulkan was worshiped as the great ‘feathered serpent’ god in the pantheon of Aztecs, Toltecs and the Mayans. The major deity (often taking the form of a mythical dragon-like entity) seems to have played a multifaceted role while practicing his ‘godly’ business. To that end, Kukulkan was the god of creation, the sire of both the Morning and Evening Star, the protector the craftsmen, the rain-maker, the wind-blower and also the fire-bringer. Interestingly, both the Mayans and the Aztecs were not too keen on solar eclipses (given the sacredness of the sun), as such their mythic traditions used to depict such rare scenarios with the Earth Serpent swallowing the great Quetzalcoatl. Furthermore, as opposed to their cultural penchant for human sacrifices, Kukulkan was supposedly not fond of such bloodthirsty practices.

#dragons #mythical #mythology #folklore
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The historical significance of the Battle of Marathon cannot be overstated, with this pivotal encounter setting the stage for the Greco-Persian wars that continued for over five decades, circa 5th century BC. In many ways, the engagement set an example of how tactical surprises could undermine the greatest of armies; and as such proved that the ‘underdog’ Greeks could defend against the sole superpower of the time – the mighty Achaemenid Empire. Interestingly enough, this major battle was also one of the rare combat scenarios of the period in mainland Greece that didn’t actually involve the warlike Spartans.

#Marathon #battle #Greek #Persian #ancient #history
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Many ancient armies used some variants of the corselet armor because of its general effectiveness against melee weapons. The Scythians were no exceptions, though they did modify some elements of the conventional corselet by arranging the metal (or leather) bits in a ‘fish scale’ like pattern. These scales were usually arranged in a meticulous manner so that one metal bit could cover around one-third (or half) of the adjacent bit, thus resulting in an overlapping pattern. This overlapping technique was also repeated along the rows, thereby protecting the stitching and holes. And since we brought up stitching, these scales were affixed to a softer leather base with the help of animal tendons and leather strings.

#scythians #scythianwarfare #militaryhistory #ancienthistory

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Proto-Indo-European (PIE) language is the hypothetical reconstruction of the modern ancestor of Indo-European languages, thus possibly pertaining to the root of around 445 spoken languages including Spanish, English, Hindi, and Russian. However, given the lack of any written record of this ‘mother’ language, PIE has been reconstructed by using methods of historical linguistics. Now since we brought up history, while there is no general consensus, PIE was possibly spoken by a group of ancient people residing in the Pontic–Caspian steppe area, north of Black Sea. But again (possibly) due to series of historical episodes (like migrations), many of the speakers became isolated from each other, thus causing divergence in the languages they spoke. The hypothetical date of this divergence pertains to around 3500 BC.

#languages #europeanlanguages #history #ancient

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The oldest case of manufacturing and supplying of goods or services directly pertains to the very history of economy (derived from Greek οίκος – ‘household’ and νęμoμαι – ‘manage’). Accordingly, economy is a major parameter of a complex, developing society – so much so that it can be perceived as a crucial scope that has led to innumerable invasions, wars, raids, trading and even exploration all throughout the course of human history. Suffice it to say, the acquisition of goods and luxury items have always played its paramount role in societal affairs of humanity.

#ancienthistory #ancient #products #expensiveproducts
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The Great Pyramid of Giza still remains the oldest yet largest of the trio of imposing structures in the Giza Necropolis. Interestingly, it is also the oldest among the Seven Ancient Wonders of the World, and yet showcases a relatively intact form – as a testimony to the engineering skills of the Ancient Egyptians. According to a short documentary put forth by the Smithsonian Channel, Jacquelyn Williamson, a Harvard University Egyptologist, the stone surfaces of the structure were nigh polished to perfection with a range of abrasives like sandstone, brick and fine sand.

#pyramid #Giza #GreatPyramidofGiza #ancienthistory
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In August 2016, the archaeological world welcomed the scanning of the Venus of Dolní Věstonice, the 29,000-year old ceramic statuette of a woman that was originally discovered in 1925 at the Paleolithic site south of Brno, in the Czech Republic. And now historians have been able to unravel some of the hidden features of the oldest known ceramic artifact, with the aid of a 3D microscope (possessed by Brno’s FEI Technological Institute) for the detailed scanning process. One of the primary features they were able to unravel related to the structural section of the prehistoric object. To that end, as opposed to multiple two-three segments of clay, the scientists found out that the Venus of Dolní Věstonice was adroitly crafted made from a single piece of clay.

#artifact #ancienthistory #ceramic #archaeology
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When we talk of the Conquistador, the subjective discussion tends to either take a damning route or present an idealizing status. But beyond the controversial colonial heritage left behind by these medieval group of swashbucklers, there is no denying the military resourcefulness of the Spanish Conquistadors (or Conquistadores, ‘conquerors’ in Spanish) – in a very brief age that barely spanned three decades till the mid 16th century. So, without further ado, let us apply the objective lens of history and take a gander at eleven incredible things you should know about the Spanish Conquistadors.

#Spain #Conquistador #Aztecs #Americas #military #history
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Like many great cities of history, Ur started out as a lowly village in the Ubaid Period of Mesopotamia, close to circa 4th millennium BC. However by virtue of its ‘convenient’ location by the Persian Gulf, nearby to the point where the great rivers Tigris and Euphrates met, the settlement emerged as a major trading hub of the region (by the Bronze Age), with its commercial networks connecting realms as far as India. And while the current location of Ur is further inland due to millennia of silting of both the rivers, the historical legacy of the great Mesopotamian city is still prominent, as can be gathered from the impressive (half restored) remnants of the Ziggurat of Ur which housed the shrine of Nanna.

#Mesopotamia #Ur #ancient #history #Sumer

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When it comes to the Giza Pyramids, our first thoughts tend to relate to the sheer size of these massive structures, further complemented by their preciseness in alignments. But this time around, archaeologists have come across the more ‘humane’ side of affairs linked to the scope of these monumental specimens. To that end, researchers from the Ancient Egypt Research Associates (AERA) were able to identify two 4,500-year old houses near the Giza Pyramids – corresponding to the time when the Pyramid of Menkaure (the smallest of the three pyramids) was under construction.

#Giza #pyramid #GizaPyramids #Egypt #AncientHistory
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