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Raymond Pirouz
Works at Paul Merage School of Business
Attended Art Center College of Design
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Raymond Pirouz

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Recently launched http://soc.raymondpirouz.com (as my alternative to using Twitter to share ideas longer than 140 characters) so come check it out!
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Raymond Pirouz

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Posted this at my tumblr:
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I like AMC's The Pitch. I may use Episode 101 (45-minutes long; you can watch it online) as a video case in a future class.

http://www.amctv.com/the-pitch/videos/season-1-sneak-peek-the-pitch
Watch The Pitch season 1 sneak peek in its entirety for free on AMCtv.com: Two agencies compete in a battle to find the next big…
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The YouTube Creator Playbook is really awesome.
YouTube Creator Playbook. Welcome to the first edition of the YouTube Creator Playbook! We're excited to provide Partners and creators with a new resource that compiles important tips, best practi...
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Yet more Google goodness you'd never know about unless you took the time to look. I like the attention Google seems to be putting into their latest initiatives -- in terms of overall aesthetics and consideration of user experience. A definite step up.
with Google. Forward thinking and rooted in data, Think Insights offers you a one-stop shop for consumer trends, marketing insights and industry research. Stay updated and join the conversation: Think...
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The Business Value Behind Social Media: 1 hour long, but that's what it takes to pump out a bunch of useful content. Good stuff throughout, worth watching.
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Raymond Pirouz

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Oh yeah #ifihadglass I would definitely wear them to class (& my students would think me bad-ass or quite possibly a big dork, which I am).

Am I bold? (check, I'm also bald if that helps).
Am I creative? (check, I can spell creative with a "K" and it still kommunicates).
Do I have $1500 to blow? (why indeed I do, so say I).

What are you waiting for, +Project Glass ? Send me a "you have been selected" email and I'll come pick it up in NYC with my cool $1500.
 
Seeking Glass Explorers: goo.gl/PbKWr

Last year we showed Glass to the world for the first time - we jumped out of airships, crashed New York Fashion Week and even took a ride on the subway. It’s been an exhilarating journey so far and there’s a lot more to come, but we can’t go it alone. We’re developing new technology that is designed to be unobtrusive and liberating, and so far we’ve only scratched the surface of the true potential of Glass.

Now we want you to get involved and that’s why today we’re expanding our Glass Explorer Program. We’re looking for bold, creative individuals who want to join us and be a part of shaping the future of Glass. Glass is still in the early stages, so we expect there will be some twists and turns along the way. While we can’t promise everything will be perfect, we can promise it will be exciting. 

We’d love to make everyone a Glass Explorer, but we’re starting a bit smaller. So, if you want to be one of the first Explorers, go to www.google.com/glass/start/how-to-get-one to find out how. 

#ifihadglass
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One of my earliest Google+ posts was about my perception of the tool and its lack of customization options for post content. It's unfortunate, now that I've revisited the platform after a long time away, to see an overall redesign that completely ignores my ability to format my posts as I see fit. I still can't easily style content (bold still requires stars around words, come on Google). I can't drag and drop multiple photos and videos between paragraphs of text? I can only add one link? It's not like Google isn't putting engineering man/woman power behind this tool. It's still not done.
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In order for Google to 'figure out what it wants to be when it grows up' (as Steve Jobs advised +Larry Page) Google must first determine what it is -- more important now than ever due to its latest +Project Glass initiative which I believe doesn't deliver on the true promise of Augmented Reality. At this stage of its life, it is beneath Google to launch any more unrefined flops -- it must get this right, and I hereby provide my feedback in the hope that +Sergey Brin, +Babak Parviz, +Steve Lee and +Sebastian Thrun can put it to good use:

Google's Core & Potential

At its core, Google is the library card catalog of hyperlink accessible human knowledge. No, it's not the library, nor is it the librarian. It's a library card catalog whose value is in directing people to information they are actively seeking online. Of course, Google's genius (resulting in its majority source of annual revenue) was in discovering how to monetize search and discovery with no cost whatsoever to the seeker of information. At its core, Google's service offering is brilliant in its simplicity and even more brilliant in its business model.

At its core, Google is the library card catalog. Google's potential is to evolve -- in the near term -- to the librarian's assistant; a HUGE evolutionary step. The library card catalog is a self-service solution lacking the richness, sophistication and contextual cross-reference intelligence (semantic web combined with artificial intelligence -- HAL, not Siri) only a gifted and caring librarian's assistant can deliver (no human librarians will be harmed). In the long term, Google's potential is to be the librarian's assistant to the digital/virtual as well as the physical world. This next evolutionary step is where Google takes what it has done by making itself indispensable to the online experience and applies it to the real-world experience, and this is where augmented reality comes in. Imagine a WWW without a search engine -- all of the content would be there, but fragmented and largely undiscovered -- very similar to what the physical world is like at the moment. Google will ultimately (or -- should ultimately) do for the physical world what it has done for the digital world, and that achievement will truly be revolutionary and aligned with Google's core reason for being. An intelligently framed, articulated, planned and executed augmented reality strategy will unlock the next level of human evolution and usher in a new age of innovation and unimaginable opportunity. This is how Google needs to grow up.

Why Augment Reality?

Before one sets out to augment reality, one must ask why it should be done -- if at all. Reality is context-poor by default. We humans shape our reality by creating meaning (yes, we literally create it from nothing), telling stories and associating feelings, thoughts or other labels to people, things, places and so on. At its most fundamental level, augmenting reality would enable us to quantify our qualitative existence, bringing science together with art to make magic -- the promise of alchemy finally within reach. Augmenting reality (done the right way) will lead to a profound increase in the quality of life for humans who will have instantaneous, contextually relevant real-world access to more information than all other generations before -- combined.

Forget the Hype -- Begin at the Foundation

The first step in determining how to deliver a compelling AR experience won't be to wonder what level of transparency the overlay screen should be for the oversized 3D travel route map. The first step will be in determining how Google will go back to its roots & discover innovative ways to begin collecting data about every place and thing people may come to experience during their course of life on Earth. Offering an AR device that only works on some things and not others is not worthy of launch -- it's worthy of discussion, which I believe Google has rightfully invited. The AR device needs to have the ability to scan terrain and objects and be able to identify object shapes in order to assist in the identification process. The AR device needs to be an input device first and foremost, before it can be considered at all for output. Therefore, Google needs to focus on the kind of technology required to scan real-time, real-world scenery and provide real-time feedback based on object ID. I know Google is already doing similar research with other projects, but it would have to be combined with hard core hardware research, innovation & investment. On the UX front, there is no reason at all for any more than 1/2 of the user's overall viewport to EVER be cluttered unless the user is not in motion and has indicated a 'full screen' preference. There is still plenty of time for UX design, but now is a good time to begin refining those UIs.

A Basic Use Case Scenario

When I look at a table with a few magazines and a coffee mug, the ideal AR device will identify the table as a table (making a determination that an object with 4 legs in the context of a room would most likely be a table -- it might ask me if it is a table when I visually select it. If I say no, it would let me identify what it was and this process would work very much like Wikipedia <-- Crowdsourcing would be a natural way to take stock of all objects in the physical world). If, in fact, the table is identified as such and I visually select it, I could determine what brand it is (if the data exists, if not I could offer it for approval, etc). When I look at the magazines, the AR device identifies the covers and offers digital versions for me to browse (if I so choose and/or if available) or basic information about each magazine (based on what the publisher has shared and/or what others have shared, including reviews, etc.). When I look at the coffee mug, the AR device scans the mug dimensions and because it has a scale built in (synchronized upon initialization and constantly updating based on my field of vision -- like the human eye, not a small task) it builds a 3D model of the mug if its shape does not exist in the database and lets me know how many ounces it can serve. If the mug is branded, I can discover where to purchase said mug, etc.

Start Deep & Work Your Way Up to Superficial

It's ok to be superficial, but it's better to start deep -- get to the root of what made Google what it is today. Google made it easy for people to discover things online by -- first -- taking stock of all things online. AR will be no different. Google will need to dig deep into the capabilities afforded by present-day technology and it may even need to invent (or spearhead the invention of) the next generation of technology for it to do what is required. Google will need to build a search engine for real life. It's not supposed to be easy, but the right path rarely is. Google AR must be about enabling anyone who wears it to elevate their human experience (but in a deep, meaningful and transformative way) -- and life as we know it will never be the same again.
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Thanks Kristian. Here are my thoughts regarding your counter-argument:

1. It charges advertisers to gain access to your eyeballs. Yes, but what comes first? It can't charge advertisers until it has our eyeballs. What I wrote above is how Google gets way more eyeballs than it ever thought possible by going beyond fad & superficiality. :)

2. I'm not saying Google went too far. If anything, I'm saying they didn't go far enough! They need to dig way deeper. They've only scratched the surface and are wearing blinders (multi-level pun intended).

If I pick on Google it's because I know they can do WAY better given the amount of brain power and potential they have over there. I expect more, and yes, agree it's a good investment. ;)
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All fruits, vegetables (and everything else for that matter) require a similar RPG treatment/thematic approach.
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Yeah we moved in the Summer of 2010!
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A fantastic story and 'modern-day' business case. Google needs to do more of this because there are many small pockets of 'long tail success' throughout its vast platform.
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I like the Google stories. Being in the dental field - that looks like a good product. I will have to check it out! :)
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I really like the new (and forward looking) Augmented Reality video by Layar.
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Yes exactly -- I use this type of content in class to enhance lectures.
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Author, consultant & lecturer helping things make sense at the intersection of design, technology, commerce and culture.
Introduction

Raymond Pirouz is an author, consultant & lecturer practicing at the intersection of design, technology, commerce & culture.

Raymond was originally inspired by the juxtaposition of science, technology, design and business while working at the Product Assurance Office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where he interfaced with senior JPL engineers to develop milestone reports on high profile space missions. It was at JPL in 1993 where Raymond was first introduced to the internet and Mosaic -- the graphic web browser. Soon thereafter, Raymond attended the Art Center College of Design, graduated with honors, worked as an interactive advertising art director and twice earned the Pioneer Direct Marketing Award. Raymond then wrote his first book and launched a consultancy where he worked with brands like Adobe, American Century Mutual Funds, Caltech, Cathay Pacific, Honda, NASA/JPL, Panasonic, Toyota, USC, Virgin Records and others. An e-Learning pioneer, in 1998 Raymond developed a two-year curriculum in design and taught it to an online student body. Before transitioning to teach and consult full-time, Raymond served as Director of Marketing at lynda.com, a subscription-based online publisher of video training material for teachers, students and creative professionals working with digital media.

Raymond has authored three books and his work has been featured or cited in publications as well as in the popular press. Raymond has served as a judge for design and advertising competitions, spoken at a number of conferences, sat on panels and taught at UCLA Extension, the Art Center College of Design, the Paul Merage School of Business at UC Irvine, the Master of Digital Experience Innovation (MDEI) program at the University of Waterloo | Stratford and the Ivey Business School at Western University.

Raymond continues his consulting practice, drawing on insights at the intersection of design, technology, commerce and culture.

Bragging rights
Worked at NASA/JPL, authored a few books, contributed to a few more and passionate about sharing knowledge with those interested in learning. Interviewed by Google Think Insights: http://www.google.ca/think/articles/perspective-raymond-pirouz.html
Education
  • Art Center College of Design
    Graphic & Packaging Design, 1994 - 1996
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Occupation
Author, Consultant & Lecturer
Skills
Design Management, Design Strategy, Design Driven Innovation, Branding, Experience Design (XD), User Centered Design, Internet/New Media/Digital Marketing, Entrepreneurship, Virtual Worlds, e-Learning
Employment
  • Paul Merage School of Business
    Marketing Lecturer, 2008 - present
    Teaching Marketing on the Internet (MBA).
  • Raymond Pirouz
    Consultant, 2004 - present
    Drawing on insights at the intersection of design, technology, commerce and culture.
  • Ivey Business School at Western University
    Marketing Lecturer, 2010 - 2015
    Teaching Marketing Core (undergrad), New Media Marketing (undergrad & MBA) and Design Driven Innovation (undergrad).
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Male