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Raphael “Speedy” Ndem
Works at The Doctors Laboratory
Attended University of Westminster
Lives in London
14,071 followers|3,045,826 views


Never really felt the novelty for obvious reasons so I'm off. Until there's a motive to return, you can find me in the world of Ingress.
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You can find me in da lab...
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How to Read a Medical Research Paper

Biomedical research is a field that touches all our lives at some point or another. Through it, we have identified new ways to prevent, diagnose, or treat most of the diseases that affect us. As such it is unsurprising to come across people who have various opinions about the accuracy of these discoveries. By confusing large-scale data with personal anecdotes, by mistaking peer-reviewed research with pseudoscience, the waters are made muddy until even undecided fence-sitters become needlessly skeptical thanks to the "well we must teach the controversy!" stories.

All this has led to an unprecedented epidemic of anti-science rhetoric, where overwhelming scientific consensus is regarded with suspicion. Vaccines, genetically modified food, diet, nutrition, chemotherapy, vitamins, supplements, acupuncture, 'cupping' (thanks Michael Phelps)...the list is endless. Matters aren't helped when newspapers overhype findings to increase circulation or clicks - CANCER CURE FOUND or DIABETES VACCINE SORTED or TRUMP MANIA CURED (I wish) or whatever.

So how do you decide for yourself, without being misled by snake-oil salesmen trying to sell their latest elixir or inexperienced journalists trying to get more clicks? Unfortunately academic jargon means reading the original research paper isn't easy unless you have a science background. Assuming the paper isn't behind a paywall and you actually get your hands on a copy, how do you begin to make sense of it? How do you know whether it's legit, so to speak?

It's all the more heartbreaking when patients, who have so much at stake, can end up endangering their health because of false promises. Open access research means more people can access research papers, but that doesn't necessarily mean the research itself is accessible.

Today I stumbled across an awesome, interactive, free to use website that guides people through the process of reading a scientific paper. It teaches you the things you should look out for, such as;

Is the paper peer-reviewed?
Who carried out the research?
Who funded it?
Was it reviewed by an ethics committee?

If it's paid for by a tobacco company and it says smoking doesn't cause lung cancer then you should rightly be very suspicious!

It also teaches you the difference between a review or meta analysis vs an individual study, and whether it's good for basing decisions on. It even goes on to explain clinical studies, and how you should evaluate them before deciding actually no, organic kale juice can't cure cancer...

Check it out -
21 comments on original post
Raphael “Speedy” Ndem's profile photo
All comments on OP pls.
Amazon Dash now available in London... looks like it's off to a great start.
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My friends and colleagues who I've tried to explain Ingress to for the last nearly 4 years are now teaching me how awesome an augmented reality game is because they play Pokémon Go.

Thanks +Niantic Project

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When you take a step out of your own lives just for a moment to see the bigger picture...
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Hosted a talk on the Roche Modular Pre-Analytics & cobas p 612, and the implications of not addressing pre-analytical errors. Smashed it 😎

Do what you love & love what you do.
Guus Janssen's profile photo
Gratz! Wow, your a real scientist man!
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Mr Robot: S2 E10 - Hidden Process

I need the soundtrack playing in the last 10 minutes of the episode.

Also, nice little Watch_Dogs plug.
Christian Caldwell's profile photoRaphael “Speedy” Ndem's profile photoRyan Martin's profile photo
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When all of ploos is frustrated and bothered. Everyone logout, and we'll reconvene tomorrow.


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+Keyan X​ I love the switch from Android to Sound on this one.

Basically, a good DAC + Amp could mean the difference between having great sound from your headphones, and having the gods of audio licking your eardrums.

If you're into sound, this might be for you.
Sometimes you need an Amp to really appreciate your headphones, or a DAC to get the quality your deserves. Well the Element by +JDS Labs Inc is the best of both, check out my review below!
There are a lot of factors that come into getting the best experience out of music, from the type and style of headphones you use, the source of the audio, and the actual music file itself. To get the best, you'll want to look into an external DAC, like The Element.
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Keyan X (Khaoszr)'s profile photoRyan Martin's profile photo
Cheers +Keyan X​. I'm kind of torn between open back or not since looking into them after your reply. They're obviously not something that would be used in public but if I was to get some then my V-Moda's won't go to waste. Then again my sound set up at home means I don't need any headphones for home use. 
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I'd play this
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Conversation with +Andrea Ndem

Me: the match is on, I should put it on the tv
Her: it's just football
Me: it's the [Euro] finals, everyone watches it
Her: who cares, I'd rather play Fallout 4.

Instantly reminded why I married her.
Jim Preis's profile photo
Long term marriage hint: SHE married YOU. ;-) j/k Hello +Raphael Ndem . Hope this message finds you well!!!
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Raphael's Collections
Laboratory Scientist - Gamer - Android & Tech - Music & Sound Engineering

Interests & Hobbies
  • Always with Headphones (Sony)
  • Android, Ubuntu (Gnome) & Windows
  • Basketball
  • Biomedical Science
    • Clinical Chemistry
    • Haematology
    • Immunology
  • Gaming (Android, PS3 & PC)
  • Life Sciences & Technology
  • Music
    • Genres - Hip hop, R&B, Soundtracks
    • Composers - Swizz Beatz, Stargate, Hans Zimmer
  • Light & Sound Engineering
  • Sarcasm & Humour
I share public, limited and community posts, links, images and videos relating to any of the above.

Feel free to message me or preferably hit me up via Hangouts.
  • University of Westminster
    MSc Biomedical Science, 2008 - 2009
    Dissertation titled "Reliability of bioinformatics tools for the prediction of trans-membrane regions of proteins".
  • University of Westminster
    BSc Biomedical Science, 2004 - 2007
    Dissertation titled "Comparison of a number of bioinformatics tools used for the prediction of secondary structures in proteins".
Basic Information
Looking for
Other names
RalphakaSpeedy, Speedy.
Collections Raphael is following
Advanced Medical Laboratory Assistant, Sound Technician, ScienceSeeker Editor
Clinical/Medical Research, Audio/Sound Engineering
  • The Doctors Laboratory
    Associate Practitioner, 2015 - present
    Supporting the Biomedical Scientists in the Clinical Biochemistry department carrying out a range of laboratory and scientific tests to support the diagnosis and treatment of disease, performing the routine diagnostic analytical work of the department via the operation and maintenance of pre and post analytical instrumentation.
  • The Doctors Laboratory
    Medical Laboratory Assistant, 2014 - present
    Receiving, identifying and preparing all routine and urgent samples and request forms entering the department, and organising their despatch to the Clinical Biochemistry, Haematology, Microbiology, Immunology and Referrals departments.
  • ScienceSeeker
    Photo Editor, 2011 - present
    Managing and updating the photos featured on the homepage, and improving the site's social media presence through Google+.
  • Amateur Theatre
    Sound Technician, 2008 - present
    Setup and running of audio (and occasionally lighting) equipment for Theatre in the Square, Incognito Theatre, and Mathew Dickinson productions in North London, and for Theatre in the Square productions at the Minack Theatre in Cornwall.
  • Royal Brompton Hospital
    Trainee Biomedical Scientist, 2004 - 2004
    Assisted laboratory staff with day-to-day duties which predominantly included specimen preparation for distribution to the appropriate departments, and storage as required. Logged patient details into a computer system utilising IT skills and attention to detail.
  • Harefield Hospital
    Trainee Biomedical Scientist, 2003 - 2004
    Assisted the Clinical Biochemistry laboratory staff with daily duties mainly involving sample processing and storage, and packaging as required for delivery to other hospital departments.
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Cairo - Rabat - Abuja - Dublin
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