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Ramya Kandregula
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Ramya Kandregula

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Interesting 3 yrs!
 
Nokia and Apple: A tale of two companies.

Nokia came to cellphones from being a paper mill. Apple came to cellphones from a history of computing. Both went through a few iterations, but at some point, early 2007, they were both almost at the same point.

Nokia on top of the ladder full of success in Phones, owning the market (and perhaps feeling invincible). Apple launching its foray into phones with one phone. Apple still has just the one. It is amazing to see what that one phone has done to the company. 

Apple's in red, Nokia's in blue. It is astonishing to think that the lines only started diverging in Q2 2009. Just. Three. Years. Ago.

#evolution   #innovation   #creativedistruction   Graph: http://goo.gl/hVk5Z
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Reconsideration Requests questions answered !
Eric Enge originally shared:
 
Just released this new interview:http://stonet.co/oLK54F. New information on reconsideration requests!
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So true!!!!!
Avinash Kaushik originally shared:
 
Here's why it is stunningly silly to argue if Google Analytics is the right tool for Enterprises, or that Omniture is or WebTrends:

Only 22% of companies have a strategy that ties data collection and analysis to business objectives. Down from 25% last year.

The problem is not the tool. The problem is you and me and our management.

[Source: Econsultancy Online Measurement & Strategy report http://goo.gl/OGscu ]
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Labels. Advanced Topics (52); AdWords (8); Analytics API (27); Announcements (82); Back to Basics Series (28); Beginner Topics (40); Business Insights (48); Code and Configuration (33); Custom Reports...
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Sweet !!! Woot!!! Woot!!!
Matt Cutts originally shared:
 
This is important: Google has been able to detect a large number of computers infected with a specific piece of malware. If you go to Google and do a search (any word will do) right now, check to see whether you get a "Your computer appears to be infected" warning at the top of the search results. If you see the message, you need to clean up the infection from your machine.

We're trying this as an experiment to alert and protect consumers that we believe have infected machines. Please share this widely.

Added: This is malware that's specific to Windows. Remember to do an actual search (any search will do) and check the top of the search results page; don't just go to the home page.
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Ramya Kandregula

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Larry Page originally shared:
 
We are in the middle of our quarterly earnings call right now. Here are the remarks I just gave. One key stat: Over 10M Google+ users!

-Larry
----------
Good afternoon everyone--thanks for joining us today

It’s exciting to be on the call today and to share directly with you the progress we have made in my first quarter as CEO

As you will have seen from our press release we had a great quarter--with revenue up by 32 per cent year on year and a new record for quarterly revenue at over $9 billion!

We have substantially increased our velocity and execution this quarter--a key goal of mine since taking over as CEO

It’s why I created a new, product focused management structure--with a clear leader responsible for each product area

This new management team is working together fabulously … and has already achieved a lot in just three months

First we launched Google+ to field trial invitation only

Our goal with Google+ is to make sharing on the web like sharing in real life, as well as to improve the overall Google experience
Circles let you choose with precision who you are sharing with. Not surprisingly this has been very well received, because in real life, we share different things with different people.
Hangouts allow for serendipitous interactions. Like in real life when you run into a few friends. It gives you seamless and fun multi user video and it’s really amazing!

Last quarter, we launched the +1 button in search results and ads--enabling users to recommend stuff they liked, and have those recommendations show up in the search results of people they know

This quarter, we released +1 buttons to the entire web, and many sites like Huffington Post, the Washington Post and Best Buy have added +1 buttons

Google+ is still only in field trial with limited access as we scale the system
Users have to be invited, sign up with a profile in order to use it

However, the growth on Google+ has been great--and I’m excited to release some new metrics for you today
Over 10M people have joined Google+
Great achievement for the team

There’s also a ton of activity
We are seeing over 1 billion items shared and received in a single day

Our +1 button is already all over the web
It’s being served 2.3 billion times a day

So while we have a lot of work still to do, we are really excited about our progress with Google+

Google+ is also a great example of another focus of mine--beautiful products that are simple and intuitive to use and was actually was one of the first products to contain our new visual redesign.

We also launched that beautiful, consistent and simpler design on our home page, Gmail and calendar with many more products soon to come.

Greater focus has also been another big feature for me this quarter--more wood behind fewer arrows

Last month, for example, we announced that we will be closing Google Health and Google PowerMeter

We’ve also done substantial internal work simplifying and streamlining our product lines

While much of that work has not yet become visible externally, I am very happy with our progress here

Focus and prioritization are crucial given our amazing opportunities

Indeed I see more opportunities for Google today than ever before

Because believe it or not we are still in the very early stages of what we want to do

Even in search … which we’ve been working on for 12 years there have never been more important changes to make
For example this quarter we launched a pilot that shows an author’s name and picture in the search results, making it easier for users to find things from authors they trust.

Of course when we started doing search, people thought we were crazy--they said there was no money to be made in search over and above a bit of banner advertising

Most new internet businesses have had the same criticism

Fast forward to today--it feels like we are watching the same movie again in slow motion

We have tremendous new businesses being viewed as “crazy”
Android
We actually have a new metric to report of 550,000 Android Devices activated a day!
That’s a HUGE number even by Google’s standards
Chrome
It’s the fastest growing browser
With over 160 million users

People rightly ask how we will monetize these businesses?

And of course I understand the need to balance the short term with the longer term needs because our revenues and growth serve as the engine that funds our innovation

But our emerging high usage products can generate huge new businesses for Google in the long run, just like search
And we have tons of experience monetizing successful products over time

Well run technology businesses with tremendous consumer usage make a lot of money over the long term

I think about our products in three separate categories

First, there is search and our ads products, the core driver of revenue for the company. Nikesh and Susan are going to talk more about ads later in the call

Next, we have products that are enjoying high consumer success--YouTube, Android and Chrome. We are investing in these in order to optimize their long-term success

Then we have our new products--Google+ and Commerce and Local. We are are investing in them to drive innovation and adoption

Overall, we are focused on long term absolute profit and growth, as we have always been--and I will continue the tight financial management we have had in the last two years, even as we are making significant investments in our future

I would like to finish on our people

Great companies are no greater than the efforts and ingenuity of their people

So continuing to hire the best, keeping them happy and well rewarded is crucial to our future

Many of you will be interested in hiring--whether we hired a few hundred more or less than you expected this quarter. But we will optimize headcount for the long term and the opportunities we see

So I’m happy with the investments we’ve made in people, though we’re probably even a little ahead of where we need to be with headcount growth at the edge of what is manageable now

It is easy to focus on things we do that are speculative (e.g., driverless cars) but we spend the vast majority of our resources on the core products. We may have a few small speculative projects happening at any given time, but we’re very careful stewards of shareholder money -- we’re not betting the farm on this stuff.

All of us at Google want to create services that people across the world use twice a day … just like a toothbrush!

And we strive to make those services beautiful, simple and easy to use

That way we can provide huge benefit to the world

We have made a good start but we are at only 1 per cent of what’s possible … Google is just getting started … and that is why I am here--working hard to lead this company to the next level
Thank You. And again, we had a great quarter.
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sweet!
Nelson Bradley originally shared:
 
Ninja of the Month for July: Business Ninja
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lol....cool one.
Have her in circles
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Did anyone see this before ???
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three adds from one site? weird

Ramya Kandregula

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Tom Anderson originally shared:
 
5 Things I Learned at MySpace that Could Help Google+ (Reprinted from Techcrunch Post http://tcrn.ch/pl6LR3)

This is just a guess, but I'd bet money that +Vic Gundotra and +Bradley Horowitz probably feel like their heads are going to explode. Anyone on the G+ team who really cares about G+ is probably getting very little sleep, and are annoying their friends and family with their one-track G+ minds. There's been such an amazing amount of feedback, the Google+ team can't help but be overwhelmed--and what we see is just on the site and in the press. Imagine what's coming into that 'send feedback' inbox that's at the bottom of every G+ page?

At MySpace I tried to digest that "inbox" and "community" by myself, and that worked pretty well for a few years. It was a little easier back then, but today's G+ users are an entirely different breed. There are a ton of early adopters, technologits on G+ -- and they've all been through the social networking ringer before. G+ users are offering powerpoint slideshows, illustrated screen mockups and long-winded essays on what needs to happen. There is genuine, high-quality thinking going on in the "free advice" that G+ is receiving from the global community. How can the G+ team cut through the noise and decide what's important? (Especially when there's some really high quality noise being directed Google's way.)

Here's a few things I'd do right now, if I were Google.

1) Start seriously courting the journalists, tastemakers, and celebrities that are using and/or pontificating about G+. This doesn't mean Google should ignore "regular" user feedback, or even that Google should do what the triumverate says they should do. It just means they should have a real, personal relationship with those people. During MySpace's run-up, journalists continually got their facts wrong about MySpace. They wrote story after story about how Facebook was bigger than MySpace when in truth Facebook wasn't even 1/10th the size of MySpace.

Why? Because the journalists' Ivy League educated children were using Facebook, and journalists have deadlines and other things to think about. If you get to know people, they think of a real human being when they write those stories, and they care a little more. I don't want to say people are "sheep," but if the general Internet population believes G+ is happening and here to stay, then they'll committ the time to try it out. Popular opinion is the biggest "filter" for most people--they don't have to try something if they've already been told its not cool. Popular opinion is the ultimate "social search" if you will. (This doesn't just apply to user counts (G+ hits 20 million!), of course. Popular opinion will shape every aspect of people's G+ perception.)

2) Exhaustively think through the privacy issues and tie up any loose/ends that G+ has on this front. I've seen multiple people share their phone number with me without knowing it. They may not be wanting to share other things as well, though those things have been less obviously private. I'd make sure that people understand how their posts can be shared/reshared, and how their other Google accounts (profile, Gmail, docs) and content (Youtube, Picasa) are connected to G+. I don't believe Privacy is a real issue to most people, but most people think it is a real issue to them. As thus, it plays a big role in pscyhological justification for defecting from competitors. "Safety" hysteria destroyed MySpace in the press. It got MySpace banned from schools, Apple stores, and by well-meaning parents who had been terrorized by what they were reading. Privacy advocates have tried to destroy Facebook and Google in the past. You need the best PR person in the world on your team, Google, but even more so, you need to make sure the software doesnt give the privacy hounds something to be rightfully angry about.

3) Move Google's top analysts (probably focused on monetisation right now) onto the Google+ project to form a skunk works team. Mine the data about G+ usage like it's Gold, because it truly is the future of Google's long-term revenue and profit growth. (And I actually don't think there'll ever be advertising on Google+, theme for another article.) Facebook was really good at understanding their onboarding process, knowing what key activities led to later usage (adding x number of friends, putting up a picture and getting a response, etc.) Google needs to closely track users who are not adopting the service, those that are, and try to understand what type of user is the one that is ahead of the curve--identify the user who is illustrating the future "common" use case through their pioneering activity. G+ needs to understand all three types of users and develop a plan for each of them.

4) Hire the best product executors & visionaries in the world, something that clearly has not been Google's forte in the past. (In fact, it seems that some good ones have left, because they felt they weren't valued at Google. http://tcrn.ch/qoP2jJ ) I'm not referring to run of the mill product managers and UI developers or "social media experts," but rather that rare breed of people who have demonstrable experience leading users down the path to internet nirvana. Google has the engineering talent and ability to scale the G+ service (more valuable than people understand, right now, I think). But does Google have the product people? Google's technical infrastructure will allow them to do things that other social sites could not do--in fact, they're already doing that. They need product visionairies who can understand that. Though I love G+, some parts of G+ are really a mess right now, and two that are incredibly important at this stage are in need of much work: onboarding & photos.

5) There must be one ring to rule them all. One leader making decisions. Maybe that's person is already in place at Google; I don't know the internal hierarchies within the company. But the leader himself, and every employee must understand who this is. Making a website is similar to making a movie--hundreds of people work on it, one person makes the final decision, and they make them every minute of the day. I use the LOTR analogy because there may be 12 extremely important product people (point #4). But someone needs to make the decisions. And to further that analogy, if the ring goes bad, the Hobbits need to throw the ring in Mt. Doom and find a new leader. OK maybe this analogy doesn't work, but you get the point. All the opinions and analysis will paralyze anyone who is not up to the task. That person has got to bring it all together and make decisions based on his gut and understanding of the overall companies mission. No that leader won't always get it right, but the clarity achieved and time saved is crucial. The Internet moves at lightning speed. If you mess up, a resolute leader can iterate and fix. This is worthy of its own dissertation, and Randall Stross makes and extend this point about Steve Jobs/Apple vs. Google right here: http://nyti.ms/mQfNve

You learn a lot when you mess up. I messed up a lot, so these are just a few of the things I learned. These lessons can be applied to any startup, so good luck everyone. I'm hoping to see you all make your mark on this world.
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Ididn't know this .... brilliant !
Matt Cutts originally shared:
 
Did you know that you can search on Google using an image? There's even an extension for Chrome so you can right-click on an image and search for similar images: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/dajedkncpodkggklbegccjpmnglmnflm

Here's what an example set of search results looks like: http://goo.gl/7330s
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IPs :-)
Avinash Kaushik originally shared:
 
Are you seeing "funny IP addresses" in your referring urls report in your analytics tools? It could be Internal IP addresses. So how do you know which IP is internal?

Here's a simple insightful explanation from my friend John Marshall...

First you should know that IP addresses come in two types: internal and public. You can recognize an internal IP because it starts with 192.168 or with 10 or 172.16-31. The internal IP identifies a machine on your network, but not the wider internet. The IP gets transformed to your network's public IP as requests go in and out of your router.

Your internal IP is like your first name. It identifies you to people near you. Thus it's not valid to take an internal IP and research it. It's the equivalent of going to the police and saying that 'David' is a criminal. Too many Davids, not specific enough.

Your public IP identifies you (or at least your company) to the big wide world in a more precise way. It's like your first name and last name. Tell the police that 'david smith' is a criminal and they have more precise information.

If you want to know your public IP, use www.whatsmyip.com . You'll find it's the same for all machines on your network, FYI. It might be worth researching more about public, internal IPs and NAT routing. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network

#nowyouknow
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