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Ralf Haring
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Ralf Haring

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"But what does it all mean, Basil?" A helpful guide to trolling terminology.
The patron saint of internet warriors breaks down every type of troll.
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Ralf Haring

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Spin all the degrees!
Snowboarder Billy Morgan becomes the first person to land an 1800 degree spinning jump, on the slopes in northern Italy.
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#oldworldproblems

"The only problem was the toilet. Sewage kept backing up. So Mr. Faggiano enlisted his two older sons to help him dig a trench and investigate. He predicted the job would take about a week. If only. “We found underground corridors and other rooms, so we kept digging,” said Mr. Faggiano, 60. His search for a sewage pipe, which began in 2000, became one family’s tale of obsession and discovery. He found a subterranean world tracing back before the birth of Jesus: a Messapian tomb, a Roman granary, a Franciscan chapel and even etchings from the Knights Templar. His trattoria instead became a museum, where relics still turn up today."
As he tried to find a sewage pipe, Luciano Faggiano dug his way past a Messapian tomb, a Roman granary, a Franciscan chapel and even etchings from the Knights Templar.
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I wish I found something half so interesting while working on our septic lines.  All I've found were some nice chunks of petrified wood and obsidian.  
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Ralf Haring

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They need to make more of these!! /ded
Fitspiration quotes are meant to get you to work harder, exercise harder. But like all other things, they do tend to get overboard. Reddit user evelee started off a thread showing how well the quotes worked with inspiration to get drunk. A few other redditors chimed in, and the thread turned pretty hilarious. Take aContinue Reading…
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Ralf Haring

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Remarkable how silly these debates seem 30 years later:

"Yes, there are a lot of people who would like to be able to work on a computer at home. But would they really want to carry one back from the office with them? It would be much simpler to take home a few floppy disks tucked into an attache case."

http://www.nytimes.com/1985/12/08/business/the-executive-computer.html
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Have them in circles
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Ralf Haring

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"It used the easy-to-crack passwords of "admin," "abcde," and "shoup" to lock down its Windows administrator account, Wi-Fi network, and voting results database respectively, according to a scathing security review published Tuesday by the Virginia Information Technologies Agency. ... The weak passwords—which are hard-coded and can't be changed—were only one item on a long list of critical defects uncovered by the review. The Wi-Fi network the machines use is encrypted with wired equivalent privacy, an algorithm so weak that it takes as little as 10 minutes for attackers to break a network's encryption key. The shortcomings of WEP have been so well-known that it was banished in 2004 by the IEEE, the world's largest association of technical professionals. What's more, the WINVote runs a version of Windows XP Embedded that hasn't received a security patch since 2004, making it vulnerable to scores of known exploits that completely hijack the underlying machine. Making matters worse, the machine uses no firewall and exposes several important Internet ports."
Virginia decertifies device that used weak passwords and wasn't updated in 10 years.
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I'm in the midst of fighting a server (metaphorical) fire at work right now, and I have to say this lifted my spirits. At least I can say "Well, at least I'm not as incompetent as the engineers at Advanced Voting Solutions". That, and a couple of glasses of wine, really helps take the edge off :)
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Goosebumps.
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Ralf Haring

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The only winner from the existence of this taboo is employers.

"“One thing we see a lot is that pay is set in your last company,” Joelle Emerson, leader of a strategy firm that works with tech companies to promote diversity, recently told Fast Company. “If you were being treated unfairly at your last company, that’s just going to follow you throughout your career." At the age of 27, I know I’m extremely lucky to have only needed two jobs to erase my initial (non)negotiation—for others, it could take many more years, even decades, to make up for wages lost, due often to circumstances outside of their control."
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"In Germany, women’s affairs minister Manuela Schwesig is pushing for a law that would force companies to “publish salary structures,” according to The Guardian. The kind of transparency championed by Schwesig may be too still radical for the majority of American companies, but that doesn’t mean we’re out of options."
We—women and minorities, and men too—need to get over the antiquated hang-ups about salary secrecy.
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+David Dickens  "1) the employee is right about how much they are worth"

If the employee is performing the same work as someone else and not being paid the same (or in the same neighborhood), they are right about being worth more as already determined by the employer who hired the other employee at that level.

"2) the internal salary structure should be more influential in determining compensation than the local labor market"

This whole thing is mostly in reference to intra-company dynamics, but if it spills over and increases inter-company competition, good.

"3) that there are no other reasons to work for an employer than the size of your paycheck"

Salary is not the only factor, but it is almost always an extremely significant factor. Among employees at the same company, with other non-salary benefits presumably being near-identical, it's an even more important comparator.

"4) the employer can afford to match salary expectations"

If they can't afford to match salary expectations across the board and the employees are fine with that, there is no problem. If they're not fine with it, then that's a shame and they'll likely have problems as employees (rightly) leave. If they can for some people but not others while pleading poverty, that's a problem. Employees should know, so they can call them on their bad behavior and leave if necessary.

Employers should not have the leverage to exploit some employees' inability to negotiate as well as others. It's a morally repugnant thing to do to take advantage of that weakness. That particular part of their toolbox should be forcibly excised.
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Ralf Haring

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Always remember it's a miracle any computers actually work at all.
Lea Kissner originally shared:
 
Spoiler: the chairman in this story is not wrong, but the problem is hilarious. This is my favorite kind of debugging: take various random bits of information and put them together to open the heavens and shine the light of enlightenment upon the brokenness that resides within the system.

I was working in a job running the campus email system some years ago when I got a call from the chairman of the statistics department.

"We're having a problem sending email out of the department."
"What's the problem?" I asked.
"We can't send mail more than 500 miles," the chairman explained.
I choked on my latte.  "Come again?"
"We can't send mail farther than 500 miles from here," he repeated. "A little bit more, actually.  Call it 520 miles.  But no farther."
From: Trey Harris Here's a problem that *sounded* impossible... I almost regret posting the story to a wide audience, because it makes a great tale over drinks at a conference. :-) The story is slightly altered in order to protect the guilty, elide over irrelevant and boring details, ...
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Ralf Haring

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Here, you can see some apes waging war and genocide on some other apes.

The Gombe community had been a united single group until about 1971 when the chimps split into two factions – one based in the north, the other based in the south. Scientists believe the death of the group’s strong leader, Leakey, may have prompted the start of the discord. A large chimp, Humphrey, became the alpha male after the death of Leakey, but Humphrey was weak and faced pressure from two brothers from the south – Hugh and Charlie. Some of the chimps followed Humphrey while others sided with Hugh and Charlie until gradually, the two groups stopped socializing with each other altogether. Before long, for reasons we may never comprehend, the Kasakela community decided they wanted Kahama’s territory – and they began a coordinated, violent campaign to get it.

(Via +Yuriy Akopov.)
The violence began on January 7, 1974 when a party of six males from the southern Kasakela tribe brutally attacked and murdered Godi, a young male member of the northern Kahama tribe. Over the next four years, all six males from the Kahama tribe would be killed by the Kasakela. Female Kahama tribe members suffered similar fates – one was murdered, two went missing and were never found, and three were kidnapped, beaten, and raped by the Kasakela. ...
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And people doubt we're related.
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Ralf Haring's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Clean Up Google Music [De-Instant Mix/Radio]
chrome.google.com

Google Music includes auto-generated Instant Mix/Radio Station playlists that cannot be removed.

De-Radio Station Google Music
chrome.google.com

Google Music includes auto-generated Radio Station playlists that cannot be removed.

G+ Hide Posts
chrome.google.com

Allows hiding posts on Google+ without permanently muting them and removing them from all future search results.

G+ Show All Pages
chrome.google.com

The G+ tab strip contains a Pages button. Only three of a user's pages are accessible when you hover over this button.

De-Instant Mix Google Music
chrome.google.com

Google Music includes auto-generated Instant Mix playlists that cannot be removed.

G+ Show Saved Searches
chrome.google.com

The G+ main page would be slightly more useful if the saved searches were available right above the trending topics.

G+ Lightbox - Hide Maximize Icon
chrome.google.com

The G+ lightbox contains a maximize icon that obscures the image and never completely fades out.