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Raina R.
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Raina R.

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RUNLITES Gear Review

New running gear is always fun for me to test, especially when it's something useful!

I received these running lights, called RunLites, a couple of months ago and now that the days are getting short, I have finally been able to put them to the test a few times!


They're designed like a glove, but with a light inside that fits into a pouch, secured with Velcro. The lights are rechargeable (with one cord that splits into two chargers) and have two different settings, one for high and one for low. All you have to do to turn them on is firmly press a button on top of your hand...

(to read full review, please follow the link)
running safety gear review ofRunLites rechargeable running gloves
14
Clinton Hammond's profile photoBra Brad's profile photoFranz Critchlow's profile photoRaina R.'s profile photo
6 comments
 
+Franz Critchlow Thanks Franz! It feels kind of like being a space alien wearing these to run in! The fleece gloves would be nice for winter if you get snow. Be careful out there!
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Raina R.

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Mildred's Trail Dash ~ Double win!
Life is full of surprises. The good ones are worth holding on to- which is why I still post in my blog from time to time!

Summer schedules have made getting in any long runs hard for me to do. Similarly, I haven't been able to get to the track often, or even maintain a base suitable for doing any significant speedwork. Despite all of those excuses, sometime a girl needs some excitement, which is why I decided to enter a smaller local race that was held July 9th.

Mildred's Trail Dash is a fundraiser for the Mildred Kanipe Memorial park in Douglas County (Oakland), Oregon. The park includes almost 1,100 acres of land, including pastures, creeks, rolling hills, orchards and forests. Historical structures include a turn-of-the-century schoolhouse, a farmhouse, and outbuildings.

The park has run into some financial difficulty since county officials recently determined that all county parks have to prove themselves financially self-sufficient or be shut down and sold or logged to cover the operating costs. The location is a little out of the way for me, but I always enjoy coming to the park and would be very sad to see it shut down. I was happy to help by running!

With my husband working the 4 pm to 4 am shift, I had to figure out what to do with my kiddos if I was to race. My oldest quickly decided he wanted to race too. We talked about whether he wanted me to run with him and whether he'd be OK with me running a 9k while he did a 5k. He was fine with different distances, so that was settled.

My middle son (9) decided to stay home and watch documentaries while dad slept. The youngest (7) wasn't sure what to do! Five kilometers on the road is a long way for him still, and this was on a trail with mud!

I put in a last minute phone call at the park and asked if my youngest could be a "helper" at the race. The woman who answered was SO kind and offered to stay with him and find some jobs for him to do so that the oldest and I could each run at our best efforts.

Before we started the race, the race director, Mike McCarty, briefed all the runners about the courses (the 9k and 5k). As he spoke, it started to rain heavily. After a few days in a row of this, it was going to be a muddy adventure!

Finally we all lined up at the start line. For the first time, I had one of my sons next to me at "go" time! And we were off...

About 400 meters into it there were three men ahead of me and I saw my son just behind my right shoulder. I tried to huff some advice to him, "Don't try to stay with me! You have to pace yourself. There's a lot of race to run!"

"I think I can hold this pace, Mom," was his reply.

What can you say back to that in the middle of a race? I didn't want to demoralize him and figured he'd have to learn his own 5k lesson.
I just said "OK."

Another 400 meters and I saw the top 3 males missed the trail and took a wrong turn. I let them know, and they quickly scampered back down to the singletrack.

We started the first big hill and things started to get really fun! There was enough mud that NObody was going fast. I passed the first mile marker and felt like I was working for it, but wasn't dying yet, which is good when you are racing 9k. I had lost sight of my son, but could still see the #2 and #3 runners when we weren't weaving through trees!

After clearing the top of the hill, there was a nice downhill stretch which was LOTS of fun in the rain. Slippery rocks, mud, wet grass and cows in the middle of the trail, all added to the excitement! I was grateful to have my Adidas Terrex Agravic shoes with the super-grippy lugs. My kiddo though.. he was wearing a pair of road Asics from track season.

At the bottom of the hill there was a turn followed by a sign for the 5k/9k split. I knew there was a woman not too far behind me, and I just tried to keep my effort level up. I am glad I have kept in decent hill shape and done the few track workouts I have done in the last month!

We all kept following the orange flagging and markers until reaching the next volunteer. She was standing in front of a flagged area and ushered us up the hill. I wondered why the marking were behind her, but having never done the 9k, just took her directions to go right. Up the next hill we went, through trees and ferns and mud, past signs with no words on them-- unless you looked backwards. I kept getting closer to the 3rd male, but couldn't quite catch him!

Finally, we were running downhill trough similar terrain, except muddier and straighter. Then I started to see a few runners running the opposite direction on the same loop. Apparently we had been asked to go the wrong way, but slower runners had done the course before and knew where to go. When we passed the volunteer again, she had moved out from her spot and everyone was running the loop clockwise, even though the first 5 ran it counter clockwise! I kept apologizing telling people I was told to go that was as I passed them.

Little by little I could see the third male getting closer. We had a final uphill and I thought maybe I should not go full blast, so I could have a bit more for the downhill. When I reached the top we were shoulder to shoulder.

It was a bit awkward running side by side.. I hoped to have a bit more leg speed, but he picked up his pace. I kept with him..until the last 600 meters. When we reached the pond and the finish line was in sight, he dropped me like a hot rock! This proves one of my sayings to be true: Never get in a sprint with a teenage boy. (I lose every time!)

As I crossed the footbridge to the last few yards, I saw something that made me smile. This young man:


My son was waiting next to the finish line when I crossed at (42:43 on the Garmin- NOT a great 9k time for me, but a good one for the conditions and the course loop reversal!).

He also shared the news that he had placed first male in the 5k! I was so surprised, thinking he might have faded and walked the last mile, but I guess he used a combination of walking the uphills and running as hard as he could to earn a solid placement.

"One girl passed me on the hill, Mom. I think she was in high school," was his report of the race.

I told him that was OK, and that he did GREAT. I couldn't have been more proud!

After catching my breath and giving my oldest son a BIG hug, the next task was to find my seven year old. He was casually walking around the pasture area with Deb,, taking 645 photos of the peacocks that roam the park entrance.

Deb told me he had been super helpful! This was the best news. I had been a little worried he might not have had a good time. A few days later when he received a letter in the mail, he was so surprised (and my heart was touched). It was a note thanking him for his help, and rewarding him with some cards for free french fries at McDonald's. What a score!

We had to stay for the awards, and my oldest was thrilled at receiving a special water bottle as well as a gift card to Subway sandwiches. I got a matching water bottle and gift card to Denny's, which I awarded to my youngest. (He has yet to redeem it, but we will have a special lunch together soon.)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Post race thoughts:

I've never wanted to push my kids into running. If they find other passions, I will support those fully! I just don't believe you can force the love of something on someone, and I definitely want them to love what they do.. However, If I am being honest, I do hope they will each find the joy of running on their own.

This day was a turning point.
It was such a moment of pride for both of us that I can see a future where one of my kids wants to run, enough to want to run with me. If that happens, I plan to make the most of that window of opportunity for as long as I am blessed with it. The moments go by so fast.
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Sagrario Garcia's profile photoGreg Ranck's profile photoRakesh Mandal's profile photoMelvin Tolentino's profile photo
7 comments
 
Nice prizes! Are there any cash prize too? 
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Raina R.

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Mildred's Trail Dash ~ Double win!
Life is full of surprises. The good ones are worth holding on to- which is why I still post in my blog from time to time!

Summer schedules have made getting in any long runs hard for me to do. Similarly, I haven't been able to get to the track often, or even maintain a base suitable for doing any significant speedwork. Despite all of those excuses, sometimes a girl needs some excitement, which is why I decided to enter a smaller local race that was held July 9th.

Mildred's Trail Dash is a fundraiser for the Mildred Kanipe Memorial park in Douglas County (Oakland), Oregon. The park includes almost 1,100 acres of land, including pastures, creeks, rolling hills, orchards and forests. Historical structures include a turn-of-the-century schoolhouse, a farmhouse, and outbuildings.

The park has run into some financial difficulty since county officials recently determined that all county parks have to prove themselves financially self-sufficient or be shut down and sold or logged to cover the operating costs. The location is a little out of the way for me, but I always enjoy coming to the park and would be very sad to see it shut down. I was happy to help by running!

With my husband working the 4 pm to 4 am shift, I had to figure out what to do with my kiddos if I was to race. My oldest quickly decided he wanted to race too. We talked about whether he wanted me to run with him and whether he'd be OK with me running a 9k while he did a 5k. He was fine with different distances, so that was settled.

My middle son (9) decided to stay home and watch documentaries while dad slept. The youngest (7) wasn't sure what to do! Five kilometers on the road is a long way for him still, and this was on a trail with mud!

I put in a last minute phone call at the park and asked if my youngest could be a "helper" at the race. The woman who answered was SO kind and offered to stay with him and find some jobs for him to do so that the oldest and I could each run at our best efforts.

Before we started the race, the race director, Mike McCarty, briefed all the runners about the courses (the 9k and 5k). As he spoke, it started to rain heavily. After a few days in a row of this, it was going to be a muddy adventure!

Finally we all lined up at the start line. For the first time, I had one of my sons next to me at "go" time! And we were off...

About 400 meters into it there were three men ahead of me and I saw my son just behind my right shoulder. I tried to huff some advice to him, "Don't try to stay with me! You have to pace yourself. There's a lot of race to run!"

"I think I can hold this pace, Mom," was his reply.

What can you say back to that in the middle of a race? I didn't want to demoralize him and figured he'd have to learn his own 5k lesson.
I just said "OK."

Another 400 meters ahead, and I saw the top 3 males missed the trail and took a wrong turn. I let them know, and they quickly scampered back down to the singletrack.

We started the first big hill and things started to get really fun! There was enough mud that NObody was going fast. I passed the first mile marker and felt like I was working for it, but wasn't dying yet, which is good when you are racing 9k. I had lost sight of my son, but could still see the #2 and #3 runners when we weren't weaving through trees!

After clearing the top of the hill, there was a nice downhill stretch which was LOTS of fun in the rain. Slippery rocks, mud, wet grass and cows in the middle of the trail, all added to the excitement! I was grateful to have my Adidas Terrex Agravic shoes with the super-grippy lugs. My kiddo though.. he was wearing a pair of road Asics from track season.

At the bottom of the hill there was a turn followed by a sign for the 5k/9k split. I knew there was a woman not too far behind me, and I just tried to keep my effort level up. I am glad I have kept in decent hill shape and done the few track workouts I have done in the last month!

We all kept following the orange flagging and markers until reaching the next volunteer. She was standing in front of a flagged area and ushered us up the hill. I wondered why the marking were behind her, but having never done the 9k, just took her directions to go right. Up the next hill we went, through trees and ferns and mud, past signs with no words on them-- unless you looked backwards. I kept getting closer to the 3rd male, but couldn't quite catch him!

Finally, we were running downhill trough similar terrain, except muddier and straighter. Then I started to see a few runners running the opposite direction on the same loop. Apparently we had been asked to go the wrong way, but slower runners had done the course before and knew where to go.

When we passed the volunteer again, she had moved out from her spot and everyone was running the loop clockwise, even though the first 5 ran it counter clockwise! I kept apologizing, telling people I was told to go that way as I passed them.

Little by little I could see the third male getting closer. We had a final uphill and I thought maybe I should not go full blast, so I could have a bit more for the downhill. When I reached the top we were shoulder to shoulder.

It was a bit awkward running side by side.. I hoped to have a bit more leg speed, but he picked up his pace. I kept with him..until the last 600 meters. When we reached the pond and the finish line was in sight, he dropped me like a hot rock! This proves one of my sayings to be true: Never get in a sprint with a teenage boy. (I lose every time!)

As I crossed the footbridge to the last few yards, I saw something that made me smile. This young man:

My son was waiting next to the finish line when I crossed at (42:43 on the Garmin- NOT a great 9k time for me, but a good one for the conditions and the course loop reversal!).

He also shared the news that he had placed first male in the 5k! I was so surprised, thinking he might have faded and walked the last mile, but I guess he used a combination of walking the uphills and running as hard as he could to earn a solid placement.

"One girl passed me on the hill, Mom. I think she was in high school," was his report of the race.

I told him that was OK, and that he did GREAT. I couldn't have been more proud!

After catching my breath and giving my oldest son a BIG hug, the next task was to find my seven year old. He was casually walking around the pasture area with Deb,, taking 645 photos of the peacocks that roam the park entrance.

Deb told me he had been super helpful! This was the best news. I had been a little worried he might not have had a good time. A few days later when he received a letter in the mail, he was so surprised (and my heart was touched). It was a note thanking him for his help, and rewarding him with some cards for free french fries at McDonald's. What a score!

We had to stay for the awards, and my oldest was thrilled at receiving a special water bottle as well as a gift card to Subway sandwiches. I got a matching water bottle and gift card to Denny's, which I awarded to my youngest. (He has yet to redeem it, but we will have a special lunch together soon.)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Post race thoughts:

I've never wanted to push my kids into running. If they find other passions, I will support those fully! I just don't believe you can force the love of something on someone, and I definitely want them to love what they do.. However, If I am being honest, I do hope they will each find the joy of running on their own.

This day was a turning point.
It was such a moment of pride for both of us that I can see a future where one of my kids wants to run, enough to want to run with me. If that happens, I plan to make the most of that window of opportunity for as long as I am blessed with it. The moments go by so fast.
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Hey
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Nut50k trail race done!
Lots learned in this, my LONGEST run ever. The good, the bad, the beautiful.. it's in here.
I never thought it would be quite this long, or that I would enjoy it as much either!
#ultrarunning   #trailrunning  #running #runnergirl  #seenonmytrail   #ultramarathon   #furtherfasterforever   #womensrunning   #outdoorphotography   #adventurephoto   #salomoninsiders   #designedforfreedom  
When I signed up for the NUT 50k I knew that it was most likely going to be the hardest I've done. It's strange to think that now I have done as many ultramarathons as I have road marathons. If you'd asked me five year...
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+Raina R. Yes! Always! 😆
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Ragnar Cape Cod - The Journey of No Man's Van

Still not sure how I made it on this "dream team" of relay runners, I woke up bright and early Friday morning to board one of our highly decorated transport systems (rental vans).

I would be spending the next 27+ hours in this "home away from home," and living the good life, also known as Ragnar Cape Cod.

Slated as our team's 7th runner, I had 21.56 miles total to run, and would be the first runner in Van 2.
Being in Van 2 has it's perks... you get to wake up early to send off the other van and then go somewhere to wait for all of them to run their first legs!

Ragnar Tip: Enjoy your free time while it lasts!
After watching the speedy Canadian writer, Sinead, take off on leg 1, we did what any smart team would do, and headed to a nearby breakfast place.
We figured we had until 4 or 5 pm until we ran.
We were WRONG. But, we had a delicious and overfilling breakfast!

Next, after someone texted us that Van 1 was running faster than predicted, we rolled ourselves over to the next major exchange to look for our team.
I had about 45 minutes to spare and used the restroom.
Ragnar Tip: Use the restroom when there is a short line if you have the chance!

Quickly, I changed into a pair of shorts, generously supplied at the last minute by the Reebok/Ragnar store tent. This was my saving grace. I don't run well overheated!

As our team's 6th runner approached, I was excited for the hand-off. The music was great and I had a personal goal to run 7:30 pace, which for me is reasonable given legs of ~10 miles, 5 miles and 6 miles.

Often runners will keep track of kills in a relay (people they pass). I don't like to operate that way; I just try not to be passed, have FUN, and stay at my personal pace goal. After a mile or so, I caught up with a man who was the last person I could see in front of me. He mentioned that he wondered if he might be lost.
Uh oh.

Then he told me he saw a sign earlier that said right, but he thought maybe he needed to go straight.
How could I have been following this guy and not be looking for signs? Serious racing error! I didn't even glance at the map before my run. Lesson learned! You can't just follow like a sheep.
Ragnar Tip: When you Ragnar, look for the direction signs.

I asked a few boys on bikes if they had seen any other runners. The first group said "Yes".. the second group we came to said "No".
At that moment I had to make a choice, and I decided to trust the first group of kids and just keep running.

Eventually Mr. Running Lost and I found another runner, and we were back in the game. (Not without a little stress though. After looking at Strava, we apparently took a scenic route, adding a half a mile of coastline views to our 9.6 miles).

Somewhere in all of this I saw my van pulled over, and all my teammates were outside cheering for me! Applause is not needed for me to run happy, but it sure helps the team to get rallied.
Ragnar Tip: Be a team player / cheerleader.

I wondered why my first leg was long after I hit the 10 mile mark.. but I had a downhill and just kept plugging at it. When I entered the exchange corral, there was a lot of cheering from people (So NICE!), but my hand-off person was not there.
Ragnar Tip: Try to stay ahead your runner.

Stretching a bit, I just smiled and enjoyed the time outside of the van to rest. I felt sorry for Amy, who was frantically getting ready to run!

Apparently my teammates in "No Man's Van" hit traffic and got stuck trying to drive from their last cheer point to the hand-off. Something like that might bug you if you are super competitive, but this was a relay-- and it's much more important to remember you are there for the FUN.
Ragnar Tip: Be flexible and forgiving.

As we hit the exchanges and darkness fell, a new Night Ragnar emerged.
We donned our required safety gear (vests, headlamps and blinking lights) and kept the rotation going as skies filled with rain clouds.
Ragnar Tip: Embrace the elements.

Keeping in contact with Van 1 became more critical, and we made use of texting as well as whatsapp, (which the Brits and the Canadians all use), to determine how long we had until we needed to run next.

After our second major van exchange, in all of the wet darkness, we decided we were ready to eat something besides Clif bars, granola bars, peanut butter rice cakes and Nuun.

It can be a challenge to find a restaurant serving food at 9:30 PM out on the cape. We considered going into a few venues, but it was Friday night and the only places open looked to be bars.

With some discussion we passed on the opportunity for a sit-down meal and also for a potential McDonald's. We decided on Subway, but they were closing and would only make "basic sandwiches", without the veggies.

Back and forth we drove through town (which town, I am not sure), looking for someplace open, determined to get some sort of sandwiches with vegetables. We were hungry, wet, sweaty, and craving salt..

Ironically, we ended up at a gas station, buying beef jerky.

At the next exchange we were able to buy hot chicken soup, or meatless spaghetti, or egg sandwiches..without vegetables, from Boy Scouts (God bless them, every one). But at this point nobody really cared what we ate, so long as it wasn't in a plastic wrapper.
Ragnar tip: You might get hungrier than you expect and at odd hours. Buy that sub sandwich during the daytime for the 10PM munchies.

After our delicious meal, we made our way to the next major exchange where we would attempt to sleep before I started off our next series of Van 2 runs.

Upon arrival, we set up camp in a semi-quiet gymnasium. Right before unrolling our sleeping bags, we learned that the other van was making good time running, which meant that we would only have an hour or so to sleep before leaving again. I tried to be cheerful, really, as I got comfortable in my sleeping bag on the gym floor, thinking about running 5 miles in the dark rain.

Then, just as I was falling asleep, Hilary came and got me for my next run. I tried not to wake everyone else, found my reflective vest and jacket and went to the exchange (forgetting to wear my race number).
Ragnar tip: Sleep is a luxury you won't need for a few days.

I was there a few minutes before I saw the Van 1 crew. Lindsay and her crew were always smiling as they waited for their last runner, and it was a boost to get me out the chute.

Night time running doesn't bother me, but in the rain it is essential that I have contact lenses in, which I did. The Ragnar turn signs were easier to see in the dark because of their lights. The rain let up, making it a comfortable running temperature; and, the darkness at 12:40 AM gave me the adrenaline needed to crank out my fastest miles for the race.

Runner by runner we handed off the slap bracelet baton, until the sun was coming up over the horizon. At the next major exchange, we sent off Van 1 and then took our van to do something I hope every Ragnarian gets to experience: we saw the sun rise as a team.
Ragnar Tip: Go see that sunrise together. You won't regret it!

Riding along with my teammates and watching them run revealed a lot about these new-found friends. Emma could hold a wicked-fast pace and had just finished running London Marathon. Amy was pretty quiet, but made everything look easy. Monica was great with maps and finding the next place. Laura always wore a smile, despite some knee pain that really intensified in the last leg. Hilary was a great driver and would be running the longest run of her life to date!

We drove ahead to the next exchange and looked for a chance to sleep and eat. It was a beautiful morning at the regional school we parked at. After some lovely breakfast sandwiches, A few people went in the gym to sleep, while I joined a few teammates in the van. There were a few hours to pass, but I wasn't sure how many. Knowing I had to run next made it hard for me to fall asleep, though I did try.

At 8 am it was warm enough to wear shorts and short sleeves outside, so I put on my sunglasses and prepared to run my last leg. As I "warmed up" I got a few funny looks and even a comment.

At this point most runners felt pretty trashed for running hard twice over some very hilly legs. The rollers were my biggest surprise of the Ragnar Cape Cod course, but thankfully I have been doing a lot of hill training and long runs.

As we neared Provicetown, the view really started to take on the classic "Cape Cod" look. It's hard not to be distracted by breathtaking seascapes that go on for miles!

Waiting for the very last hand off. Wish we could have stayed longer!
Now we were really feeling the sun and doing our best to help each teammate finish strong. Hilary, whose longest run ever had been 6 miles, ran in the final 10 mile leg for our team. I was inspired.

Due to some misunderstanding regarding the finish line shuttle, (and perhaps over-zealous cheering), we managed to miss being at the finish line to run in with her. Luckily the Van 1 runners were there to do the honors, 27 hours 45 minutes 58.6 seconds after we started our adventure, making us the 27th coed mixed team, but the first all women's team IF we had entered that division.

Shortly after Hilary finished, some of us walked, (and some of us hobbled), our way from the parking lot up the hill to the finish line at the Pilgrim monument.

Clam chowder, quinoa salad and (for some of us) beer, have never tasted so good as they did Saturday afternoon, sitting in Provincetown with my teammates.

In reflection, Ragnar Cape Cod all went by so quickly. But I have no doubt the memories will last for a lifetime. If you ever get the chance to do a Ragnar Relay, I hope you'll take it.

Thanks again for the opportunity, +Reebok !

#relay  #running #runnersworld #womensrunning   #ragnarrelay   #ragnarCapeCod  
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247 viz's profile photoRaina R.'s profile photoGreg Ranck's profile photo
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Great reading +Raina R. . I enjoy the running adventures so make sure to post more. They are fun to read. Take care and enjoy !!
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Raina R.

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Such a great time at Eel lake with new running friends yesterday : 6 miles of dirt and smiles!!
#theSUNcameout #itsRAININGagaintoday
#garminvirb #newtoy @garminoutdoor #trailrun #ultratrail #trailrunningviews 
See this Instagram photo by @seenonmytrail • 375 likes
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I envy not only the scenery but the fact you can run outside in shorts ... lol.... stay well +Raina R. . OI'm glad it was a good day.
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Raina R.

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The South Coast running club in Coos bay / North Bend, Oregon, puts on several top-notch races. In the past I have found that although they are not chip timed, they are accurate, well staffed, and fun to participate in. The S...
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Thanks +Rain Days !
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Raina R. changed her profile photo.

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Fantastic Raina.
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Raina R.

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A Decent Running App for the Track?!
When I got to the track today, I realized I forgot my Garmin.
(Rookie mistake, I hope NEVER to do again!)

After I googled running tracking apps, I saw +Runner's World Magazine had a few suggestions. In a short time I found one that not only could be manually lapped, but could also export to Garmin connect and Strava (and a whole list of other sites!).

Full post here: http://www.smalltownrunner.com/2016/06/a-decent-running-app-for-track.html?m=1

Do you use a watch or an app to run?
Have you ever ran a track workout with an app? Which is your favorite?

#running #fitness #app #runningtechnology #workout
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Just did the math for clarity. 10 years (since 2006) with Nike+. Prior to that, I used the Garmin Forerunner GPS watches since 2003. Looking at 13 years strapped to a electronic tracker.
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Raina R.

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Never underestimate your ability to do great things. A person can get pretty far on a little bit of dreaming and a whole lot of willpower. 👊🏼👊🏼💗

Wishing you the best of adventures this weekend!
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You are inspiring! F4F?
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192 miles, 12 runners, 2 vans!
Reebok Ragnar Cape Cod was unforgettable.
52
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Chris Bernard's profile photoWilliam Bowers II's profile photoRaina R.'s profile photo
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+William Bowers II Someone could organize something.. somewhere..? haha! Which state, though? Or maybe I run to the edge of oregon and pass it off in California or Washington, or idaho, or nevada...
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Raina's Collections
Story
Tagline
Runner, believer, wife & mom of 3 boys.
Introduction
Passionate about running and LIFE. 

Here on G+, I post my best photos from my time on the trails, road and track.

Occasionally, I post some pretty random stuff, for instance:
  • pictures of mushrooms, 
  • squirrel massage, 
  • reviews of running gear, shoes, and outdoor products (one or two a month)
  • running data and maps, or 
  • things I find too funny or important not to share! 
Anything is fair game!!!  

I am very active socially, and you can also find me on Instagram and Twitter, though I occasionally take a break and hide under a rock,

Sometimes I miss things O_o ... 
If you are a runner and have me circled, please be so kind  to leave me a comment or mention me in a post about running (mine or yours!) so I can put you in my "RUNNING" circle. 

Bragging rights
I have changed a diaper one-handed and ran a 50k, but not at the same time.
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Relationship
Married
Work
Employment
  • smalltownrunner.com
    Running Blogger, 2010 - present