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Rahel Anne Bailie
Works at Intentional Design Inc.
Attended Concordia University
Lives in Oakham, UK
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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ Tech & design stuff  - 
 
A former client pinged me to ask about best practices for populating UI strings with content. I have seen quite the hodge-podge of methods over the years, and wondered what good practices are out there. Here are the options I've heard/seen to date:
Worst option: Developers enter some text on their own.

Second-worst options: 
Marketing comes up with some text and gives it to the developer to enter.
UX comes up with text and give it to the developer.

Middle-of-the-road options (but not terribly efficient): 
UX comes up with text and stores it in [one or more] resource files that the developers use to suck the text into the UI
TechComm comes up with text and stores it in [one or more] resource files that the developers use to suck the text into the UI

Best option:
TechComm manages the UI text in a CCMS/HAT, which keeps the content coordinated with all the rest of the help content, and exports to an area where the text can get sucked into the UI

What are the variations you've seen and what do you consider best practice?
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Michael Andrews's profile photo
2 comments
 
Does anyone else have experiences with UI text - such as text as a 'variable'?  It's an important topic that doesn't get sufficient attention.  Sometimes it may seem we are at the mercy of our tools, or how a project is structured.  But microcopy is important, and there are ways to customize tools to give one more control.  Share your experiences on this area, successful or challenging. :)
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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ Tech & design stuff  - 
 
I recently wrote two posts about the folly of managing content as data. Now, +Don Day has contributed a guest post on rendering content from the repository. 
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Matt Barger's profile photoMichael Andrews's profile photo
 
Very clever use of database acronym CRUD to talk about textual content.  Using the term "rendering" is also interesting, since it is so closely associated with graphic representation, and not substantive aspects of content.

I would love to see more on read/render as it relates to non-textual content.  For example, are there things one can do with images or video that allow user adaptation or presentation neutrality?
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Rahel Anne Bailie

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Very excited to receive my copies yesterday. Let the sharing begin!
 
 
Hey, content strategists (and future content strategists and maybe-I'm-a-content-strategists and I-think-I'm-in-love-with-a-content-strategists). The new book by +Scott Abel and +Rahel Anne Bailie has arrived. 

Scott says, "Early birds can order their copies of 'The Language of #ContentStrategy' today! The book was produced using structured XML and a wiki. In fact, we created multiple deliverables (print, web, eBook) from a single source."
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Sascha Stoltenow's profile photoLisa Trager's profile photo
 
Can't wait to get my copy!
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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ Structuring & modeling  - 
 
Can you manage content the same way you manage data? Or is this a recipe for disaster? First of two parts on the topic.
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Nino Rapin's profile photoMichael Andrews's profile photo
 
Hi Rahel, Hope your father is ok.

Glad to see you address an interesting and increasingly important topic.  I've reach the conclusion that people can make an artificial distinction between data and content, and as a result tend to dismiss interesting content as being "just data."

Data can either be raw data (not meaningful) or factual data (meaningful to humans).  Meaningful content can be generated entirely from data, such as good interactive visualizations of data.  Obviously such data needs a content container to provide a context.

Content can also embed data, and content can imply data (relationships and meaning, via semantic web or text mining).  Relational databases are not the only way to manage data.

Look forward to your further discussion.
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Rahel Anne Bailie

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When technology becomes the confounding force

In under two weeks, I will be going to the UK for a year-long contract, to work on a complex and exciting content strategy project. As part of the ritual of leaving behind, albeit it temporarily, a community of 20 years, I decided to have a get-together, a chance to see all of my friends and colleagues before I head out. I created a guest list, put it into some software, created an invitation, and sent it out. A couple of weeks later, I noticed that more people than not hadn't viewed the invitation yet. What happened?

A few phone calls later, I discovered that many of the "regular" folk (I.e. not working in technology) had not realized that they had a tabs feature in gmail. The invitation had been route to the Social tab, and there it languished, along with unread notices of meet-ups and events. The idea that new features can be rolled out, without preparation notice, and without taking into account what we'd call the change management piece, has become the new pain point. People work on muscle memory. Click here, type that, move the mouse over there...and one day it doesn't work. The user is awakened from their auto-pilot wondering what they were doing, and what they were looking for.

A local UX practitioner told me a story about a library site that listed links on how to get into various webmail sites: Yahoo, Hotmail, AOL, etc. during. Revamp, the IA suggested that this page be removed. The library staff protested vigorously; it seems that thousands of patrons only know how to get to their webmail by going to the library site and clicking on "their link". I don't suggest that the UX never be changed for he better - I happen to love the tabs - but I do think we need to have a better grasp of the consequences for our full range of users before disrupting their workflows, and find multiple ways to communicate those changes to our audiences.

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4 comments
 
I haven't been to Corby in over 15 years.  Last time I was there I was teaching RS Components developers Enterprise Java.
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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ General repartee  - 
 
Last chance to register for the webinar I'm presenting (thanks for inviting me, soap!) on Content Strategy in a Content Economy.
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+SoapconfPage/posts 

(Posting in general because I don't see an Events category)
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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ General repartee  - 
 
I can't remember in which category I put part 1, but here is part 2: managing content in the manner it deserves. (I promised it for end of January, but life got in the way.)

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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ Tech & design stuff  - 
 
Although NPR socialised the COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere) acronym, the concept has been around for a couple of decades. There are two basic COPE variants, which work in very different ways. I gave a Lightning Talk at Together London this week, where I raced through the differences and application for each type in five minutes.

https://www.slideshare.net/rahelab/content-first-cope-made-easy
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2 comments
 
There was video made. Whether mine is one of the 11 presentations that gets edited for the site, I don't know. You'll have to ask +Jonathan Kahn or +Richard Ingram about that. But I did put my verbal presentations in the notes of each slide, so you can follow along. You just have to imagine my voice and intonation.
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O'Reilly has a sale on XML Press Books. If you haven't bought the book that Noz and I wrote yet, here's your chance to get it at a discount.
http://shop.oreilly.com/category/publishers/xml-press.do
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Destry Wion's profile photoCynthia Hartwig's profile photoRahel Anne Bailie's profile photoSally Bagshaw's profile photo
6 comments
 
See, everybody is a creative director on social media. You want that cover to pop since the info inside
is terrific. That's my beef :-)
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We've written about the ROI of content strategy. This agency takes it a step further. Is the role of content strategy to support innovation? It's an interesting extension of the ROI argument. If innovation distinguishes a brand from its competitors, then the organization needs a way to efficiently and effectively repurpose the right content, at will, to support that innovation. You can read James Riley's article in The Huffington Post: http://goo.gl/j1qPJ8
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Destry Wion's profile photoScott Abel's profile photoRahel Anne Bailie's profile photoP Bradley Robb's profile photo
4 comments
 
Thanks for sharing, Rahel. The argument about innovation is how I sell content strategy to clients. My latest gig is with one of the world's biggest publishers of newspapers, magazines, and books (they also play in television, news, cable and digital media advertising). They don't care about anything other than ensuring that they innovate in an effort to protect profits, 90% of which, for most divisions of the company, come from advertising. If advertisers (customers) are not producing content and generating their own traffic, they become competitors. That's ultra scary for folks who make their living selling access to audience. Content-driven innovation is the primary focus, followed by innovation that strips away unnecessary steps in the production process. The time they plan to save will be used for (drum roll) innovation!
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People
In her circles
339 people
Have her in circles
712 people
Adrian Kingwell's profile photo
Brian Kirby's profile photo
Eugene Farber's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Develop content strategies, UX, CM consulting
Employment
  • Intentional Design Inc.
    Develop content strategies, UX, CM consulting, 2002 - present
  • City of Vancouver
    Senior Content Strategist, 2011 - 2012
  • Intel, Trillium, LSS BC, Philips Electronics
    2000 - 2002
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Oakham, UK
Previously
Niagara Peninsula - Wainfleet, ON - Montreal, QC - Vancouver, BC
Story
Tagline
Content strategist by day. Techno-gran by night. Picky always.
Introduction

Integrator of content strategy, requirements analysis, information architecture, and content management to increase ROI of product lifecycle content. Supporter of content structure and standards. Founder of Intentional Design, Fellow of the Society for Technical Communication, accredited Cognitive Edge practitioner.  Co-producer of Content Strategy Workshops. Co-author of Content Strategy: Connecting the dots between business, brand, and benefits.

Education
  • Concordia University
Basic Information
Gender
Female
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rahelab
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• • •
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This is a chain of stores with beautiful things. And it's within a couple of hours of the Canadian border. In the stores, they accept Canadian credit cards. But online? I tried to place an order of almost $500, and after spending 1.5 hours picking out stuff, couldn't use their online checkout. (I have a US address to ship the order to.) What kind of store does such a myopic thing? Soured me on the entire experience.
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
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