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Rahel Anne Bailie
Works at Intentional Design Inc.
Attended Concordia University
Lives in London, UK
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Oh, the irony - my article on the difference between content marketing and content strategy, and why content marketers need to know the difference was published yesterday on The Content Wrangler site.
Why Content Marketers Need to Know about Content Strategy. Categories: Blog, Content Engineer, Content Marketer, Content Strategist. By Rahel Anne Bailie, Content Strategist, Intentional Design rahelbailie2011. The term “strategy” is defined as “alternatives chosen to make happen a desired ...
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Peter Kelly's profile photoJoe Pulizzi's profile photoRahel Anne Bailie's profile photoDevonte Anderson's profile photo
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I think all the professions are equally valuable, and have their place. For example, I would make a terrible content marketer, and admit that freely. I think the challenge, because some of the professions are quite new, is to figure out how they all fit together to complement each other in working relationships. There can be a lot of support for content marketing if that side of the house wants to collaborate with the other side of the house, and I'm sure that will come in time. 
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If you have any love for content strategy and particularly for intelligent content, you need to read and critique this article. The woman obviously has no idea what she is talking about. (First hint: a listicle about how to create a strategy, and it's so fluffy, I can taste the sugar in my mouth right now, feh!)

Now, I left a comment and it was rejected because it was (respectfully) critical of the article. I said "This is a great post about content marketing strategy but has little to do with content strategy and nothing – and I repeat for emphasis – nothing to do with intelligent content. Classic mistake, and really degrades the complexity that goes into content strategy. Sorry to sound so harsh, but I see this all the time, and it is the first exercise that I have to run clients through to make them unlearn their misconceptions about what intelligent content is. I am really disappointed in this post."

I'm not suggesting that you be critical of the article just because I am. But I am (a) disappointed that this author is taking the Sarah Palin approach to dialogue (delete any dissenting voices rather than enter a dialogue) and (b) that she is so quickly working hard to turn intelligent content into some pablum under the content marketing rubric. I don't think it's doing any practitioner any favours!
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Leticia Mooney's profile photoRahel Anne Bailie's profile photoJoe Pulizzi's profile photoDestry Wion's profile photo
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+Joe Pulizzi I am a big fan of no comments, actually, especially when it means reducing the overhead they demand, and especially still if the comments are few and low-value to begin with. And the idea of Disqus putting ads in them now is a big turn off for me.

I think it's better to reduce both tech and human resource overhead on comments as much as you can, and make the barrier to entry as low as possible; i.e., little to no need for signing up with something to leave a comment.

For CSF articles, as example, we don't use use comments via the CMS (too much tech overhead) or some commenting system (an account barrier), rather we add a link at the bottom to the associated post in the CSF G+ page and let people rant and rave their. Of course, G+ is not everyone's cup of tea, but we find the advantages from the lower overhead far outweigh what little comes from comments in general. The barrier to access is much lower, and Google provides some pretty nice tools for moderation. It's also a lot more dev and mobile friendly that way too.

The only thing I'm thinking we should do differently is share those G+ Page posts in the community here too, because there are way more members in this community than there are following the CSF Pages, so I don't think those posts get seen as much. I need to talk to our community manager on that, but it seems sensible to me at this point.

Anyway, to each community it's own method. ;)
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Rahel Anne Bailie

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UX for Dummies has a chapter on content strategy!
 
Need help with UX for #Omnichannel? Get #UX For Dummies by @kpnichols&@D_Chesnut http://www.amazon.com/dp/1118852788/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_awdo_ … … via @amazon#UserExperience
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Rahel Anne Bailie

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Big Design has come and gone for 2014, but +Brian Sullivan and crew are already making plans for a tighter, more exclusive roster for 2015. Watch for it!
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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ Structuring & modeling  - 
 
What happens when you treat your IP as a property instead of a book.
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+Rahel Anne Bailie Great! If/when you're ready to draft something let me know. I'll give you a link that will provide more details about our editorial workflow.
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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ Tech & design stuff  - 
 
A former client pinged me to ask about best practices for populating UI strings with content. I have seen quite the hodge-podge of methods over the years, and wondered what good practices are out there. Here are the options I've heard/seen to date:
Worst option: Developers enter some text on their own.

Second-worst options: 
Marketing comes up with some text and gives it to the developer to enter.
UX comes up with text and give it to the developer.

Middle-of-the-road options (but not terribly efficient): 
UX comes up with text and stores it in [one or more] resource files that the developers use to suck the text into the UI
TechComm comes up with text and stores it in [one or more] resource files that the developers use to suck the text into the UI

Best option:
TechComm manages the UI text in a CCMS/HAT, which keeps the content coordinated with all the rest of the help content, and exports to an area where the text can get sucked into the UI

What are the variations you've seen and what do you consider best practice?
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For easier localization, UI strings should be done as variables, and the values of the variables stored in a text file. Then the text file is translated (one would hope the translator is given sufficient context), greatly simplifying the translation process. This text file can be used both by the interface code and by the documentation.
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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ General repartee  - 
 
Last chance to register for the webinar I'm presenting (thanks for inviting me, soap!) on Content Strategy in a Content Economy.
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+SoapconfPage/posts 

(Posting in general because I don't see an Events category)
Central-European technical communication community with global reach
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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ Tech & design stuff  - 
 
I just read this article about Google introducing structured snippets. Because I'm all about structure and standards, it was of interest to me. But what they're implementing seems to be based on extraction of content from tables. I wonder if this ends up penalising content that has been properly structured, and never in tables to begin with. Thoughts?
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Dear all - sorry my earlier reply rambled on.  It was a hurried reconstruction of single long response I'd previous written that someone got deleted.  

Please add your own thoughts - I think it's an important topic, and deserves more insights than I've managed to provide.
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Rahel Anne Bailie

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Good advice. Now, just finding time to write!
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Content engineering: hard core content strategy activity!
 
My entry in The Language of Content Strategy has surfaced as the term of the week. It's Content Engineering. It's a pretty Old School definition and therein, I believe, lies its merit. In other venues, I come out swinging in order to take down, in a fashion worthy of George St. Pierre, other definitions that are closer to sprinkling a little technology onto the business of content or assuming that mastery of angle brackets and style sheets will fit the bill. If people wish to venture an alternative definition to mine, I would say, again in the spirit of GSP, "Allons-y!" or "Bring it!"
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Rahel Anne Bailie's profile photoMichael Andrews's profile photoDestry Wion's profile photoJoe Pairman's profile photo
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Thanks for the mention, +Destry Wion, though I'm afraid I've neglected the G+ Content Engineering community recently! +Michael Andrews, +Joe Gollner has good answers to all those questions, and it's pretty much his definition I had in mind when I created the community. I think he coined the term "content engineering", actually. So yes, it is about the technology and the engineering principles behind the way that the technology components are put together and used.

I'd say that this applies to any content and doesn't require specific tools/markup. However, it's not what some people would have it mean: the way that writers put together sentences and paragraphs, or the way that they need to consider how content will be used in different cultures.

I think Joe Gollner has content strategy and content engineering as different but complementary disciplines, although content engineering does need to stem from a strategy of course.
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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ General repartee  - 
 
Excited to be a Customer Experience Recognition Awards judge. They say you never know your stuff till you teach it. Well, or judge it! http://awards.techwhirl.com/2014/08/28/judge-profile-rahel-anne-bailie/
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Congratulations +Rahel Anne Bailie :)
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Rahel Anne Bailie

▸ General repartee  - 
 
 
call for speakers extended until June 30th. we want to hear from you, let us know what you want to talk about.
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People
Have her in circles
858 people
Jeff Cram's profile photo
Karen Holland's profile photo
Andrew Brooke's profile photo
Verbo Lixity's profile photo
Andrew Bidese's profile photo
Liz Quigley's profile photo
Rebecca Hall's profile photo
Jarrod Gingras's profile photo
Joanna Levitt's profile photo
Education
  • Concordia University
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Other names
rahelab
Story
Tagline
Content strategies and digital strategies by day. Techno-geek by night. Picky always.
Introduction

Integrator of content strategy, requirements analysis, information architecture, and content management to increase ROI of product lifecycle content. Supporter of content structure and standards. Founder of Intentional Design, Fellow of the Society for Technical Communication, accredited Cognitive Edge practitioner.  Co-producer of Content Strategy Workshops. Co-author of Content Strategy: Connecting the dots between business, brand, and benefits. Co-editor of The Language of Content Strategy.

Bragging rights
Work on increasingly complex content and digital strategy projects for Fortune 500 and FTSE 250 companies and on government projects.
Work
Occupation
Develop content strategies, UX, CM consulting
Employment
  • Intentional Design Inc.
    Develop content strategies, UX, CM consulting, 2002 - present
  • City of Vancouver
    Senior Content Strategist, 2011 - 2012
  • Intel, Trillium, LSS BC, Philips Electronics
    2000 - 2002
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
London, UK
Previously
Oakham, UK - Vancouver, BC - Montreal, QC
The upstairs of the shop is full of gowns of every size, shape, and colour. I am hard to fit (short and on the round side) so thought I would have to dig through tons of gowns, but the staff were able to point me in the direction of one right away that fit beautifully. I came back with my accessories, and they were helpful in telling me what worked and what didn't with the gown. There are full-length mirrors and stools to stand on, so the gowns will drape nicely, and the staff are knowledgeable and friendly. I'd go there again, for sure.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
This is a chain of stores with beautiful things. And it's within a couple of hours of the Canadian border. In the stores, they accept Canadian credit cards. But online? I tried to place an order of almost $500, and after spending 1.5 hours picking out stuff, couldn't use their online checkout. (I have a US address to ship the order to.) What kind of store does such a myopic thing? Soured me on the entire experience.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
2 reviews
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