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Project Geo

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What's the best mainstream application for storing Geotagged photos? Find out in our article below.
#ProjectGeo   #geotaggedphoto   #Geo   #GIS   #mobilephotography   #Geospatial   #GISData  
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Project Geo

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USGS has a new way of displaying geospatial datafeeds of their hydrography dataset. #GIS #Data #Datafeed #USGS #Hydrography
 
New Hydro Tools: The USGS has released a web-based geospatial services known as the Hydrography Event Management (HEM) Tools that allow users to create, edit, and display geospatial markers, called Events, that are referenced to the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). Events can be customized by the user to represent nearly any water-related feature. Some examples of Events include streamgages, scenic or impaired stretches of river, fish passage barriers, toxic spills, or put-ins/take-outs for boats. For this initial release, users can customize their own HEM Web edit tool using a sample application and the required web services. http://bit.ly/R7RvCB

‪#‎hydrography‬ ‪#‎water‬ ‪#‎USGS‬ ‪#‎NHD‬ ‪#‎streams‬ ‪#‎streamgages
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Justin Holman brings up some excellent points using the science of Geography, or in this case the commons sense, as he makes his case against economist Thomas Sowell relating to the real-estate market of the Palo Alto area.
#realestate   #Economy   #SanFrancisco   #PaloAlto   #Geography   #GIS   #Geo   #Geospatial   #Maps  
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Heatmap displaying popularity of a music genre relative to geography.
#Music   #HeatMap   #Maps   #GIS   #Geo   #Geospatial  
 
The Music Genre Heat Map

Movoto has created an interactive map that visualizes the popularity of different music genres throughout the USA. Pick a genre of music and you can view a heat map showing you where it is most popular.
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An interesting correlation between metal and jazz :-)
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GIS on Mobile can mean many different things. Here is a brief opinion piece exploring a few Geo applications on Android. Let us know what you think with your comments below. #GIS   #Geospatial   #Geo   #Android  
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BackCountry Navigator has a free trial version that lasts 21 days I think, so I'd recommend giving that a tumble and see if it works well for you before shelling out 10 clams for the full app. 
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Be sure to check out our review of #GEOINT2013 *. Also tell us what you thought about this years symposium in the comments. #GIS   #Geospatial   #Geo   #geointsymposium   #USGIF  
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Have them in circles
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Project Geo

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A summary of Earthquake activity this year...
 
Todos los sismos que se registraron desde el 1 de enero hasta el 30 de abril de 2014!
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Geospatial Data Sources - Foundation of Awareness
We've come out with a similar list before but we decided to update and go deeper into what Geospatial Data Sources are available to give you a good start. Perhaps we should call this a Geospatial Data Starters Kit?
#Geospatial   #GIS   #Geo   #Maps   #DataSources   #Data  
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Well....I guess it could be worse. Overall the Stereotype map is just amusing.
We asked people in BuzzFeed's U.K. office to tell us what stereotypes they had of every state in the U.S.A. Here are their responses. We're so terribly sorry, America.
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Amazing that Street View is now at the point where it has recorded enough data that a user can take a peak from past to present for a particular spot. Check it out...
#Streetview   #googlestreetview   #Maps   #Geo   #Geospatial   #GIS  
 
Time Travel with Street View

Over the next few days  Google Maps is rolling out a new feature which will allow you to travel back in time with Street View and view historical Street View imagery that Google has since updated.
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Fascinating map visualizing counties where alcohol is still illegal to sell in the United States 80 years after prohibition. To clarify in some counties cities within can still be considered "wet" with the ability to purchase alcohol but outside city limits those citizens must venture either to a different county or into the city to get their booz.
 
This map surprised me: 81 years after prohibition was repealed, sale of alcohol is still illegal in many US counties. In fact, it's illegal in nearly half of Mississippi. There is also appears to be a close correlation between counties that are "dry" and those which have the "least expensive housing wage" according to the 2010 Census. 

The red counties are where the ban is county-wide, the yellow counties are where some restrictions may apply.
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Fascinating to learn there's a stretch of water touching both the Gulf of Mexico and Pacific across the American continent.
 
The river connecting two oceans: A creek in Wyoming splits in two, one side flowing to the Atlantic and one side to the Pacific. You can't pass the blue line without crossing water.

From Wikipedia:
Parting of the Waters is an unusual hydrologic site at Two Ocean Pass on the Continental Divide, within the Teton Wilderness Area of Wyoming's Bridger-Teton National Forest. Two Ocean Pass separates the headwaters of Pacific Creek, which flows Westerly to the Pacific Ocean, and Atlantic Creek, which flows Easterly to the Atlantic Ocean. At Parting of the Waters, exactly on the Continental Divide at 44°02.576′N 110°10.497′WCoordinates: 44°02.576′N 110°10.497′W, North Two Ocean Creek flows down from its drainage on the side of Two Ocean Plateau and divides its waters more-or-less equally between its two distributaries, Pacific Creek and Atlantic Creek. From this split, Two Ocean Creek waters flow either 3,488 miles (5,613 km) to the Atlantic Ocean via Atlantic Creek and the Yellowstone, Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, or 1,353 miles (2,177 km) to the Pacific Ocean via Pacific Creek and the Snake and Columbia Rivers. At Parting of the Waters, water actually covers the Continental Divide such that a fish could safely swim from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean drainages. In fact, it is thought that this was the pass that provided the immigration route for Cutthroat Trout to migrate from the Snake River (Pacific) to Yellowstone River (Atlantic) drainages.
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"The world just got a whole lot smaller"
Introduction
We are ramping up for #GEOINT2013! Brace Yourselves GEOINT posts are coming!

Project Geo is a web series dedicated to increasing awareness of Geospatial Technology, industry best practices, and GIS resources. The cast consists of Adam Simmons and Mason Rothman.

We also air special episodes covering unique topics and interviews. Last year we covered GEOINT 2012. Here are a few notable people we have interviewed:
  • Keith Masback - USGIF President
  • Dr Shay Har-Noy - Tomnod CEO
  • Paul Van Dinther - A-Tour
Others we have had on the show include:
  • Mickey Mellen - Google Earth Blog
  • Bert De Bruijn - WikiWar
  • Wes Herche - Geospatial Enthusiast
  • Josh Williams - geteach.com
We love having guests on the show to elaborate on specific areas of the Geospatial Industry. If you consider yourself a Geospatial expert, hobbyist, or someone who is involved with maps, geography, cartography, or anything related to GIS we welcome your participation and input. Send us a message on Google+ if you want to be apart of our next episode.